2011-2012 Courses

Fall 2011

Undergraduate Academic Courses

MUSI 1010: Introduction to Music

Bonnie Gordon
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-11:50 am / Wilson Hall 301
Class Number: 20214

Discussion Sections:

Section 103 (Victor Szabo): F / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 20217

Section 104 (Victor Szabo): F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 20218

Section 106 (Victor Szabo): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 20220

Surveys the musical literatures that make up the common listening experience of contemporary Americans, emphasizing such “classical” repertories as symphony, opera, “early music”, “new music,” blues, and jazz. Teaches effective ways of listening to and thinking critically about each repertoire. Considers how musical choices reflect or create cultural identities, including attitudes toward gender, ethnicity, social relationships, and ideas of the sacred.

MUSI 1310: Basic Musical Skills

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Courtney Kleftis): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11286

Lecture / Section 2 (Aurie Hsu): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11287

Lecture / Section 3 (Matt Jones): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11288

Study of the rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music. Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of music required.

 

MUSI 1993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 2080: American Music

Jason Kirby
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 16807

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Michael Bishop): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH 113 
Class Number: 16808

Section 102 (Michael Bishop): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 16809

Section 103 (Michael Bishop): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 113 
Class Number: 16810

This course examines the rich cultural heritage of "roots" genres such as blues, country, gospel, bluegrass and folk in American musical life. We'll take an historical approach to the subject, one which identifies the term "roots" as a late-20th-century invention used by journalists and fans to help explain the rise of more recent, related genres like rock and hip-hop. The course will examine the relationship of "roots" music to modern identity politics--particularly representations of African-Americans, working-class white Southerners, and rural Americans more broadly. We will track these representations in 20th century film, popular journalism, and musical performance itself. This is a lecture survey course, with weekly discussion sections.

MUSI 2110: Music in Everyday Life

Michelle Kisliuk
3.0 credits
Lecture: T / 2:00-4:00 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11290

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Erik DeLuca): W / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11291

Section 102 (Erik DeLuca): W / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008 
Class Number: 11292

Section 103 (Erik DeLuca): W / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008 
Class Number: 11293

What is the soundscape of our quotidian (everyday) experience? How does it condition our consciousness, and what implicit cultural messages circulate within our ever-changing daily soundtracks? This course focuses our attention not on music highlighted in performance, but on that which we usually take for granted. A close look at how music works in our everyday lives can offer a new awareness of our ongoing experience, open us to choices we never thought we had, and get us wondering about the depths of aesthetic experience.

MUSI 2302: Keyboard Skills (Beginning)

Kevin Davis
2.0 credits, instructor permission
Lecture: TR / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 11294

Introductory keyboard skills; includes sight-reading, improvisation, and accompaniment at the keyboard in a variety of styles. No previous knowledge of music required. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors.

MUSI 2340: Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1: MW / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 12532

Lecture / Section 2: MW / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 15951

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns. This course will follow my book "Learn To Groove" and can include music students, non music students and is open to students of all skill levels. The course requires that students have or purchase a hand drum of their own. Congas, bongos, djembes, doumbeks or any other hand drums are appropriate.

MUSI 2350: Technosonics: Digital Music and Sound Art Composition

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 12:00-12:50 / Wilson 301

Class Number: 20221

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Jean Maroun): M / 9:00-9:50 am / Wilson 306 
Class Number: 20222

Section 102 (Jean Maroun): M / 10:00-10:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 20223

Section 103 (Jean Maroun): M / 11:00-11:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 20224

Section 104 (Chris Peck): R / 1:00-1:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 20225

Section 105 (Sarah O'Halloran): T / 10:00-10:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 20226

Section 106 (Chris Peck): M / 1:00-1:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 20227

Section 107 (Chris Peck): R / 10:00-10:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 20228

Section 108 (Sarah O'Halloran): M / 2:00-2:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 20229

Section 109 (Sarah O'Halloran): T / 2:00-2:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 20230

This class (www.technosonics.net) explores the history, theory and practice of digital music and sound art. Students learn tools and techniques of music technology that inform many genres and traditions. In addition to historical and theoretical concerns, students will experiment with digital tools for musical creation.

MUSI 2600: Jazz Improvisation

John D'earth
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 15305

MUSI 2993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 3020: Studies in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Music

Richard Will
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00 am-12:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 20231

Music, Performance, and Identity in 18th-Century Europe and North America. We will study works by J.S. Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Rameau, and others, with an emphasis on how their music helped to define individual identities and social communities during a period of far-reaching political change. Our listening will cover opera, religious music, song, and all forms of instrumental music. We will discuss 18th-century and modern views on music, and compare modern and historical performance practices. This course satisfies the Second Writing Requirement.

MUSI 3050: Music and Discourse Since 1900

Scott DeVeaux
3.0 credits
Lecture: MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 11296

Studies the range of music that has flourished in the twentieth century, including modernist and post-modern art music, popular music, and world music, through historical, critical, and ethnographic approaches.

MUSI 3120: Jazz Studies

Scott DeVeaux
3.0 credits
Lecture: MWF / 1:00-1:50 pm, OCH S008 
Class Number: 20232

MUSI 3310: Theory I

Stephanie Doktor, Peter D'Elia and Jeff Decker
3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1: Stephanie Doktor / MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11297

Lecture / Section 2: Peter D'Elia / MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11298

Lecture / Section 3: Jeff Decker / MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11299

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significant compositions by period composers. (Y)

MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336: Musicianship I, II and III

1.0 credit

All students must take a placement exam for entrance into the Musicianship courses. This placement exam will be held on Wednesday Aug. 24th from 12:00 to 12:50 in OCH 107. There are no exemptions from this exam, please email Adam Carter, createEmail('acc8v'); with any questions.

These lab courses give practical experience with many aspects of musical perception, performance, and creation. These will include sight-reading and sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and harmony; aural identification of intervals, chords, and rhythmic patterns; and exercises in musical memory and improvisation. Students entering the sequence take a test to determine the appropriate level of their first course. At the end of each course, students take a placement test to determine whether they may enter a higher level course. Courses may be repeated for credit, but each course may be counted toward the major only once. MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336 are co-requisites for MUSI 3310, 3320, and 4331. This means that students pre-registering in the latter courses must also pre-register in MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336 unless they have already taken the highest level course and have been passed out of further co-requisite requirements. Students interested in taking Musicianship but not Theory are encouraged to register for MUSI 3332, 3334, or 3336 as space permits. Such students may not pre-register. They should plan to register by adding in Fall after taking a placement exam.

MUSI 3332: Musicianship I

Lecture / Section 1: (Adam Carter) M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Liza Sapir) F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11301

Lecture / Section 2: (Adam Carter) M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Liza Sapir) W / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11300

MUSI 3334: Musicianship II

Lecture / Section 1: (Adam Carter) W / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Steven Kemper) F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11303

Lecture / Section 2: (Adam Carter) W / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Steven Kemper) M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11302

MUSI 3336: Musicianship III

Lecture / Section 1: (Adam Carter) F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Amy Coddington) M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11304

Lecture / Section 2: (Adam Carter) F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Amy Coddington) W / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11305

MUSI 3380: Introduction to Post-Tonal Composition

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 16811

This course is an introduction to post-tonal compositional techniques in Western concert music of the 20th and 21st centuries. The course will survey a multiplicity of innovative approaches to harmony, rhythm, timbre, texture, and compositional form. Topics will include atonal, serial, chance, experimental, spectral, electronic, minimal, and improvised music. Coursework will focus on instrumental composition and creative assignments, as well as analytic listening and writing assignments.

Proficiency on an instrument or voice is highly recommended but not required.

Prerequisites: MUSI 3310 or Instructor Permission

MUSI 3390: Introduction to Music and Computers

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00 am - 12:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11306

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Braxton Sherouse): T / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 11308

Section 102 (Braxton Sherouse): F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 11307

Section 103 (Braxton Sherouse): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 11309

Introduction to Music and Computers in an upper-level introductory course in music technology. Students gain theoretical, historical and practical knowledge of electronic and computer music. An emphasis is placed on creative hands-on experience composing computer music.

Theoretical and practical topics include acoustics, recording, editing and mixing, MIDI, sound synthesis, and audio DSP. Programs used will include Audacity, Spear, SoundHack, Pro Tools, Logic, and MaxMSP. Note that you MUST register for the Lab (0 credits) as well as the course.

3390 fulfills the composition requirement of the Music Major. This is a composition class and most assignments are creative in nature.

MUSI 3993: Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 4331: Theory III

Michael Puri
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 9:30-10:45 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11311

Studies in 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century techniques and styles through analysis and composition. Prerequisite: MUSI 3320 or instructor permission; Corequisite: MUSI 3332, 3334, or 3336, except for students who have already passed the exit test for MUSI 3336.

MUSI 4509: Cultural & Historical Studies
Topic: Roots Music of Multicultural America

Joel Rubin
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12053

“Roots Music of Multicultural America” looks at American traditional and popular musics from a cross-cultural and multi-ethnic perspective. We will examine the traditions most often called “roots music,” including African-American blues and southern old-time string band music, which influenced the development of rock and roll and country and western. We will also study a wide range of other ethnic musical traditions, from Native American pow wows and Cajun to salsa, klezmer and Balkan-Gypsy-punk, which have influenced popular music-making of the past twenty-five years. Along the way we will treat a complex and shifting web of associated ideas, such as authenticity, heritage, nationalism, and multiculturalism, and the musical or music-marketing categories of folk, roots, indie rock, neo-cabaret, and world music. We will ask how “roots” traditions have fed into definitions of “American-ness” over the years, and whether recent trends represent signs of America’s transforming itself into a post-ethnic, post-racial society. This course is designed for music majors, but others may apply with instructor permission. It fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

MUSI 4510: Cultural & Historical Studies
Topic: Music and Christianity

Maria Guarino
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:45 / OCH 107
Class Number: 20692

This course examines the intersections of music and Christianity in different times and places, from the Middle Ages to today, and from the United States to Europe, Latin America, and Africa. We will look at the role of music in Christian worship and communities, and the views on music held by church authorities, worshipers, and musicians. Focusing on musical performance and style, and on issues of faith and belief, ethics and morality, we will study traditions such as Western choral music, South African men's a capella choirs, African American Gospel song, modern Catholic liturgical music, Caribbean Pentacostalism, Lenten festivals in Latin America, and more. Final research projects will allow students to explore related topics of their choice. This course is designed for music majors, but others may apply for instructor permission. Satisfies the Second Writing Requirement.

MUSI 4519: Critical Studies of Music
Topic: Song and Beyond: Text and Music from Madrigals to Hip Hop

Vilde Aaslid
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00pm-3:15 pm / OCH 113 
Class Number: 20233

This course will study examples of texted music from a broad range of periods and genres, including madrigals, Bach's cantatas, German Lieder, the Gershwins, and hip hop among others. We will guide our study of the examples by asking questions about the text/music relationships: How are the words and music relating to each other and how do the roles of the composer and poet/lyricist shape this relationship? What are the social and aesthetic forces involved in forming the nature of the interaction between music and word? How have critics and historians understood the dynamics between music and word, composer and poet? And how does all of this influence our current performance and reception of these works?

MUSI 4543: Sound Studio: Producer as Composer

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: R / 5:00-7:30 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 12234

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Paul Turowski): T / 4:40-5:30 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 12235

Section 102 (Paul Turowski): T / 5:40-6:30 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 15300

This seminar examines the increasingly creative role of production in recorded music over the last 50 years. Materials, topics and themes include: (1) survey and analysis of key recordings; (2) theoretical and practical understanding of technologies used in recording and production; (3) developments in music production (such as the naturalization of 'illusion') in the context of broader technological and cultural developments; and (4) creative studio projects.

Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.

MUSI 4750: Choral Conducting I

Michael Slon
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107 
Class Number: 20234

Studies in the basic technique and art of conducting, with weekly experience conducting repertoire with a small choral ensemble. Prerequisite: basic ear training, sight-reading. Previous experience in a choral or instrumental ensemble is preferred. Interested students should consult with the instructor before registering. Instructor permission is required.

MUSI 4993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

 

Graduate Courses

MUSI 7511: Introduction to Music Research

Bonnie Gordon
3.0 credits
Lecture: R / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008 
Class Number: 12237

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

MUSI 7519: Current Studies in Research and Criticism: Analysis and Interpretation of Popular Music

Fred Maus
3.0 credits
Lecture: M / 4:30-7:00 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15314

The course deals mostly with Anglo-American popular music since World War 2. It teaches skills in analysis of pitch structure, form, and rhythm in popular music, as well as relations between music and lyrics, and addresses interpretive issues of semiotics and social/political meaning. Intended for PhD students in Music and others who want professional training in this area.

MUSI 7532: Musical Analysis: Music and Culture in Third-Republic France

Michael Puri
3.0 credits
Lecture: T / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 20235

This course surveys the music and culture of Third Republic France, which stretched from the Franco-Prussian War to World War II. We will pay particular attention to the life and work of Debussy, Satie, and Ravel, not only because of the sheer quality and historical influence of their music, but also because of its deep entanglement with the important trends of this period: Wagnerism, exoticism, symbolism, decadence, medievalism, neoclassicism, the "guerre des chapelles" between rival musical factions, and jazz, among many others. Primarily intended for PhD students. The abilities to read French and decipher musical scores will be useful, but are not required.

MUSI 7350: Interactive Media

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: M / 3:00-5:30 pm / OCH B011 
Class Number: TBA

 

MUSI 7543: Sound Studio: Producer as Composer

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: R / 5:00-7:30 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 12238

This seminar examines the increasingly creative role of production in recorded music over the last 50 years. Materials, topics and themes include: (1) survey and analysis of key recordings; (2) theoretical and practical understanding of technologies used in recording and production; (3) developments in music production (such as the naturalization of 'illusion') in the context of broader technological and cultural developments; and (4) creative studio projects.

Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.

MUSI 7547: Materials of Contemporary Music

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits
Lecture: W / 3:30-5:45 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: TBA

This iteration of MUSI 7547 focuses on the string quartet: its cultural history, analysis and composition, and their mediation by contemporary musical and social practice. Examples will be drawn from the full range of the literature, and we will consider the field of options for us as contemporary composers in preparing to create new string quartets. Assignments will include analytical and compositional work as well as the in-depth study of string techniques.

MUSI 8810: Advanced Composition

3.0 credits

MUSI 8910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by first-year graduate students.

MUSI 8960: Thesis

3.0 credits

MUSI 8993: Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits

Independent study dealing with a specific topic. Requirements will place primary emphasis on independent research.

MUSI 8998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

MUSI 9010: Directed Readings

3.0 credits

 

MUSI 9910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by second year graduate students.

MUSI 9930: Independent Research

3.0 credits

Research carried out by graduate student in consultation with an instructor.

MUSI 9998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

Preliminary research directed towards a dissertation in consultation with an instructor.

MUSI 9999: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.

Music Ensembles and Performance Instruction

For information on auditions, please visit ourauditions website.

MUBD 2610, 2620, 2630, and 2640: Marching Band I-IV

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: TRF 6:00-8:20 pm, TBA

MUBD 2610
Class Number: 11196

MUBD 2620
Class Number: 11197

MUBD 2630 
Class Number: 11198

MUBD 2640
Class Number: 11199

The Cavalier Marching Band is open to all students at the University of Virginia by audition. The band is comprised of members from nearly every major at UVA. A normal practice schedule is twice a week, with additional Friday practices on home game weeks. Attendance is mandatory at our band camp in August. There are no fees to be in the Cavalier marching Band. IF you are interested please contact the band office at 434.982.5347 or email William PeasecreateEmail('pease');.

MUEN 2690, 3690 and 4690: African Music and Dance Ensemble

(registration number depends on student seniority in the ensemble)

Michelle Kisliuk
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 5:15-7:15 pm / OCH 107

MUEN 2690
Class Number: 16051

MUEN 3690
Class Number: 11234

MUEN 4690
Class Number: 16052

The African Music and Dance Ensemble is a practical, hands-on course focusing on several music/dance forms from Western and Central Africa with performances during and at the end of the semester. Though no previous experience with music or dance is required, we will give special attention to developing tight ensemble dynamics, aural musicianship, and a polymetric sensibility. Concentration, practice, and faithful attendance are required of each class member, the goal being to develop an ongoing U.Va. African Music and Dance Ensemble.

MUEN 3600: Jazz Ensemble

John D'earth
2.0 credits
Lecture: MR / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11200

Led by internationally recognized jazz trumpeter/composer John D'earth, the Jazz Ensemble is a full-sized jazz big band, whose focus includes “head arrangements” group improvisation, world music and original compositions from within the band, along with music ranging from swing to bop to fusion. You'll gain valuable experience in ensemble playing and in the art of solo improvisation, and may take private instruction in jazz improvisation, perform in small combos and participate in jazz workshops held by such major figures as Michael Brecker, John Abercrombi, Dave Leibman, Bob Moses, Clark Terry, and Joe Henderson.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3610: Orchestra

Stephen Czarkowski, Interim Conductor
2.0 credits

Strings

Lecture / Section 100: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11201

Sectionals: M / 5:30-7:00 pm

Section 101: Pete Spaar (Double Bass) / OCH B012
Class Number: 11203

Section 102: Adam Carter (Cello) / OCH S004
Class Number: 11204

Section 103: Ayn Balija (Viola) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11205

Section 104: Daniel Sender (Violin) / OCH 107
Class Number: 11206

Section 105: David Sariti (Violin) / OCH B018
Class Number: 11207

 

Brass / Woodwinds / Percussion

Lecture / Section 200: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11202

Sectionals: W / 5:15-6:15 pm

Section 201: Susan Fritts (Horn) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11211

Section 202: Rob Patterson (Clarinet) / TBA 
Class Number: 11209

Section 203: Aaron Hill (Oboe) / TBA
Class Number: 11212

Section 204: Elizabeth Roberts (Bassoon) / OCH B020
Class Number: 11208

Section 205: Kelly Sulick (Flute) / OCH B019
Class Number: 11210

Section 206: Paul Neebe (Trumpet) / 107
Class Number: 11215

Section 207: Nathan Dishman (Trombone) / B012 
Class Number: 11214

Section 208: I-Jen Fang (Percussion) / B018
Class Number: 11213

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3620: Wind Ensemble

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: M / 6:45-9:00 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building / Room 200
Class Number: 12046

The Wind Ensemble is a 45-member ensemble that features the most outstanding brass, woodwind, and percussion players at the University. The focus of this ensemble is to explore new literature as well as perform the masterworks of the wind band era. The wind ensemble also works with outstanding guest performers and conductors. This group is predominately made up of non-music majors who enjoy the genre of the wind band. Open to all University of Virginia students, auditions are held prior to the start of each semester. For more information on the Wind Ensemble, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/ensembles/windensemble/.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 1: Clarinet Ensemble

Rob Patterson
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA 
Class Number: 11218

MUEN 3630, Section 2: Double Reed Ensemble

Aaron Hill
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 5:15-6:45 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11217

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 3: Flute Ensemble

Kelly Sulick
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11216

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 4: Woodwind Ensemble

Elizabeth Roberts
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11219

Explore, rehearse and perform woodwind chamber music, including both standard and more obscure works. Focus on developing chamber music playing skills, learning the tendencies of the woodwind instruments, developing musicianship, and enjoying making and sharing music! Instructor permission and audition required.

MUEN 3630, Section 5: Brass Quintet

Paul Neebe
1.0 credit
Lecture: W / 3:30-4:30 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11221

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630: Jazz Chamber Ensemble

1.0 credit

Lecture / Section 7: Pete Spaar / R / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11225

Lecture / Section 12: Pete Spaar / F / 12:30-2:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11226

Lecture / Section 21: Mike Rosensky / T / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 12533

Lecture / Section 22: Jeff Decker / F / 2:30-3:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 12534

MUEN 3630, Section 8: Horn Ensemble

Susan Fritts
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 2:00-3:30 pm / OCH B012 
Class Number: 11220

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 9: Klezmer Ensemble

Joel Rubin
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH 113 
Class Number: 11223

Klezmer, originally the ritual and celebratory music of the Yiddish-speaking Jews of Eastern Europe, was brought to North America by immigrants around the turn of the last century. Since the 1970s, a dynamic revival of this tradition has been taking place in America and beyond. Klezmer’s recent popularity has brought it far from its roots in medieval minstrelsy and Jewish ritual and into the sphere of mainstream culture. The traditional klezmer style presents the experienced instrumentalist with a range of technical challenges with its characteristic note bends, rubati, Baroque-style embellishments and other micro-improvisational techniques, opening up a world of expressive possibilities not available to them from either classical music or jazz. This music was passed on orally from generation to generation, and many of the ornaments which are so integral to the klezmer sound can only be approximated by Western staff notation – not to mention the patterns of improvised variation which are the cornerstone of the style. There will therefore be an emphasis on learning by ear as much as possible, but we will be using music in the form of lead sheets and other written instructional materials to supplement sound examples.

The class focuses on the study and performance of various traditions, including the klezmer traditions of New York between the two world wars, 19th century Eastern Europe, as well as original contemporary compositions. Emphasis will be on learning by ear, improvisation within a modal context, and learning to develop a cohesive ensemble sound. Concentration, practice, and good attendance are required of each ensemble member. Our planned outside guest artist for Fall 2011 is pioneering performer-arranger Frank London (Klezmatics, Klezmer Brass All-Stars, Hasidic New Wave, etc.). TBC.

Admission is by audition during first class period of semester or prior to that, by appointment with the instructor.

MUEN 3630, Section 10: Percussion Chamber Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 9:30-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 11224

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Re-established in spring 2005 by I-Jen Fang, principal timpanist and percussionist with CUSO, the Percussion Ensemble is a chamber group that performs literature ranging from classical transcriptions to contemporary music. The ensemble draws upon a large family of pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments, and the number of players and amount of equipment varies greatly from piece to piece. Music reading skills and basic percussion technique on all percussion instruments is required. Previous percussion ensemble experience is highly recommended. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

MUEN 3630, Section 15: Trombone Ensemble

Nathan Dishman
1.0 credit
Lecture: F / 4:00-5:30 pm / OCH B012 
Class Number: 11222

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition. Contact Nathan Dishman ( createEmail('nathandishman', 'yahoo.com');) to schedule an audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 16: Chamber Music Ensemble

Daniel Sender
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11227

MUEN 3630, Section 17: Chamber Music Ensemble

Ayn Balija
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11228

MUEN 3630, Section 18: Palladian Chamber Orchestra

David Sariti
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: R / 5:00-6:30 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11229

MUEN 3630, Section 20: Chamber Music Ensemble

Adam Carter
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11230

MUEN 3630, Section 23: Chamber Music Ensemble

Mimi Tung
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 13144

MUEN 3650: University Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11232

The University Singers is the University's premier SATB ensemble, performing a cappella and accompanied choral literature ranging from chant to the works of contemporary composers. Past repertoire has included Bach's Mass in B minor, Orff's Carmina Burana, the Duruflé Requiem, and Bernstein's Chichester Psalms, as well as shorter a cappella works. Recent trips have taken the group to Atlanta, Charlotte,Chicago, Cincinnati, New Orleans,New York City, Philadelphia, and the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., as well as the campuses of other American universities for collaborative concerts. The group has also been heard on European tours in England, Italy, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland. Recent highlights have included performances with the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia, a concert and workshop with Bobby McFerrin, and a concert tour of the Southeastern U.S.

Students in the University Singers come from all six of UVA's undergraduate schools, including Arts and Sciences, Education, and Engineering, as well as several of the University's graduate and professional schools. Together, they enjoy an esprit de corps that arises from the pursuit of musical excellence and the camaraderie the singers develop offstage.

All singers at the University - undergraduates, graduate students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to audition. University Singers is offered for two hours academic credit. Michael Slon, who has conducted choruses at the Oberlin Conservatory and Indiana University School of Music, is the conductor. For more information on the University Singers, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/usingers/. Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3651: Chamber Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: F / 1:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11231

Chamber Singers is a select ensemble drawn from the University Singers. The ensemble meets once a week and focuses on music for chamber choir ranging from the Renaissance to contemporary pieces. Recent performances have included the Monteverdi Mass for 4 voices (1651), Britten'sHymn to St. Cecilia, and Bach'sCantata 150, as well as contemporary works by Meredith Monk and Eric Whitacre, and arrangements of classic jazz standards by Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, and the King's Singers. Interested singers will be considered for the chamber ensemble as part of their University Singers audition. For more information, please visit our webpage atwww.virginia.edu/music/chambersingers

Restricted to: Instructor permission

MUEN 3670: Early Music Ensemble: Baroque Orchestra

David Sariti
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 7:30-9:00 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12239

The Baroque Orchestra, directed by David Sariti, offers students the rare opportunity to perform music of the 17th and 18th centuries on the instruments for which it was written, at low pitch. Students use period instruments from the University's extensive collection, receiving personal instruction on the special techniques necessary, and must be accomplished on their modern counterparts.

MUEN 3680: New Music Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 3:45-5:15 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11233

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Performance of vocal and instrumental music of the twentieth century.

A one-credit course at the University of Virginia, the New Music Ensemble explores and performs exciting music of our time. The ensemble consists of dedicated instrumentalists, singers and UVa performance faculty. We perform a wide variety of contemporary music suitable to our instrumentation, including new works created by UVa composers.

The New Music Ensemble seeks dedicated instrumentalists and singers to explore and perform a wide variety of contemporary music. To audition, come to the first class with your instrument. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

Open to UVA students, community musicians and advanced high school students.

 

Private Performance Instruction

For more information on registration procedures, please visit the lessons website.

Lesson Levels

There are three levels of private performance instruction.

200-level

For students playing at a beginner to intermediate level or with limited time to practice. One hour or one-half hour lessons, CR/NC (pass-fail), ½ or 1 credit. No jury, but optional performance opportunities will be available. Individual instructors may, as they wish, set definite performance requirements for their students. A limited number of scholarships may be possible, as funding permits, but normally students at this level should expect to pay for their lessons.

300-level

Advanced performance, for students working at the level of a music major, though not necessarily majoring in music. Prerequisite: at least one semester of 200-level study and a successful audition. Normally auditions take place during fall or spring juries; if this is not possible, students audition at the beginning of the semester. One hour lessons, graded, 2 credits. Students at this level should make a time-commitment to practicing appropriate for major-level study. We suggest a norm of at least 6 hours/week, though individual performance instructors may set a different (lower or higher) expectation of practice time as appropriate. Students play a jury at the end of the semester. Students at this level are often on scholarship, but scholarship support is always contingent on availability of funds.

400-level

Honors performance, to be taken for two semesters, by fourth year students preparing a senior recital or, in cases of unusual ability, by students preparing a full recital to be given before their fourth year. Prerequisite: 300-level study, successful written application in the semester before enrolling, and a successful audition (to be included in juries) at the end of the semester before applying. One hour lessons, graded, 2 credits. Jury at the end of the first semester, recital near the end of the second semester. Normally on scholarship, but scholarship support is always contingent on availability of funds.

Offerings

Lessons are offered in the following areas (See the Course Catalog for complete listings):

* Voice
* Piano, Organ, and Harpsichord
* Violin, Viola, Cello, Doublebass
* Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, English Horn, Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Bassoon, Contra-Bassoon
* Trombone, Trumpet, Tuba, French Horn, Saxophone, Jazz Improv
* Percussion, Jazz Drumming, Tabla, Afro-Cuban percussion
* Guitar, Chapman Stick, Banjo, Harp, Mandolin
* Supervised Performance (For students involved in types of solo or ensemble performance not offered through the department.)

 

Spring 2012

Undergraduate Academic Courses

MUSI 1040: Exploring the Orchestra

Kate Tamarkin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00am-11:50pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19909

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Eric DeLuca): F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19910

Section 102 (Eric DeLuca): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19911

Section 103 (Eric DeLuca): F / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH S008 
Class Number: 19912

MUSI 1310: Basic Musical Skills

Sara O'Halloran / Courtney Kleftis / Jeff Decker 
3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Sara O'Halloran): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11325

Lecture / Section 2 (Courtney Kleftis): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11326

Lecture / Section 3 (Jeff Decker): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107 
Class Number: 11324

Not open to students already qualified to elect MUSI 3310 or 3320. Study of the rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music.

MUSI 1620: History of the Wind Band

William Pease 
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-11:50 am / Hunter Smith Band Building 
Class Number: 15800

MUSI 2080: American Music: History of Rock

Michael Bishop
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 12595

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Stephanie Doktor): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 12596

Section 102 (Stephanie Doktor): R / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113 
Class Number: 12597

Section 103 (Stephanie Doktor): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12598

 

MUSI 2120: History of Jazz Music

Scott DeVeaux 
4.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-12:15 pm / Wilson 402
Class Number: 11327

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Matt Jones): W / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11328

Section 102 (Jason Kirby): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11329

Section 103 (Jason Kirby): F / 11:00-11:50 pm / OCH S008 
Class Number: 11330

Section 104 (Matt Jones): W / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11331

Section 105 (Matt Jones): W / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11332

Section 106 (Maria Guarino): T / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11333

Section 107 (Maria Guarino): T / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH 113 
Class Number: 11334

Section 108 (Jason Kirby): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 11335

Section 109 (Maria Guarino): R / 9:30-10:20 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11336

Section 110 (Jean Maroun): F / 11:00-11:50 am /
OCH 113 
Class Number: 15813

Section 111 (Jean Maroun): F / 9:00-9:50 am /
OCH 113
Class Number: 15814

Section 112 (Jean Maroun): F / 10:00-10:50 am /
OCH 113
Class Number: 15815

Survey of jazz music from before 1900 through the stylistic changes and trends of the twentieth century; important instrumental performers, composers, arrangers, and vocalists.

MUSI 2302: Keyboard Skills (Beginning)

Kevin Davis
2.0 credits, Instructor Permission

Lecture / Section 1: MW / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 12591

Lecture / Section 2: MW / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 19914

Introductory keyboard skills; includes sight-reading, improvisation, and accompaniment at the keyboard in a variety of styles. No previous knowledge of music required. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors.

MUSI 2304: Keyboard Skills (Intermediate)

John Mayhood
2.0 credits, Instructor Permission
Lecture: MW / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12592

Intermediate keyboard skills for students with some previous musical experience. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors. Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUSI 2306: Fretboard Harmony

Mike Rosensky
2.0 credits, Instructor Permission
Lecture: MWF / 1:00-1:50 / OCH B012
Class Number: 12593

The level of this course will vary, anywhere from beginning to advanced, each semester depending on the guitar experience of students who enroll. Students should contact Mike Rosensky (createEmail('mlr5q');) during pre-registration letting him know of their interest in the course and of their intent to show up for the first class of the semester when the level and the make-up of the class will be ultimately determined.

In Fretboard Harmony a theory-based approach will be taken to understanding how musical materials (scales, arpeggios, chord voicings) "fit" on the guitar. The majority of class meeting time is spent with guitars in hand "drilling" new material. Practice methods will be explored, with an emphasis on learning how to practice effectively and efficiently.

MUSI 2340: Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1: MW / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 15819

Lecture / Section 2: MW / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 12594

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns. This course will follow my book "Learn To Groove" and can include music students, non music students and is open to students of all skill levels. The course requires that students have or purchase a hand drum of their own. Congas, bongos, djembes, doumbeks or any other hand drums are appropriate.

MUSI 2600: Jazz Improvisation

John D'earth
3.0 credits 
Lecture: TR / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 14017

The Jazz Improvisation Workshop explores the basic techniques and procedures for improvising in jazz and other musical contexts. No previous jazz or improvising experience is required but students must demonstrate a degree of fluency on their main instrument, an ability to read music and some familiarity with the basics of music theory. An individual interview/audition with the instructor is required before registering for this class.

MUSI 3030: Studies in Nineteenth-Century Music

Michael Puri
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 9:30-10:45 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 19916

A survey of predominantly European music in the nineteenth century. We will cover a breadth of composers (for example, Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, Berlioz, Wagner, and Verdi), genres (solo instrumental, art song, choral, instrumental chamber music, concerto, symphony, opera), nations and regions (France, Germany and Austria, Italy, Russia, England, North America), and topics (salon culture, virtuosity, folk music, exoticism, musical meaning, memorialization, etc.). Ability to read scores is required; Theory 1 strongly recommended as a prerequisite. Fulfills first historical requirement or elective requirement for the music major.

MUSI 3050: Music and Discourse Since 1900

Fred Maus 
3.0 credits
Lecture: MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11337

Studies the range of music that has flourished in the twentieth century, including modernist and post-modern art music, popular music, and world music, through historical, critical, and ethnographic approaches.

Required of all majors; fulfills the "Introductory course" requirement for majors.

Prerequisite: The ability to read music, or any three-credit course in music, or instructor permission.

MUSI 3090: Performance in Africa

Michelle Kisliuk
4.0 credits
Lecturer: TR / 4:00-4:50 pm /OCH 107
Class Number: 19917

This course explores performance in Africa through reading, discussion, audio and video examples, hands-on practice, and – new this semester – teaching and performing with local school children. The course meets together with MUSI 3690 (African Drumming and Dance Ensemble), but is a full academic course. Students in Music 3090 are automatically part of the UVA African Music and Dance Ensemble. Your role in the Ensemble as learner and performer is crucial to your overall work in the course. This semester, the Community Engagement initiative will involve students participating once a week in an after-school club, teaching and mentoring children from two area schools.

We will explore African music/dance styles – focusing on Ewe music from Ghana and Togo and BaAka music from the Central African Republic, but branching to other forms and genres – their sociomusical circumstances and processes, as well as performed resistances and responses to the colonial and post/neo-colonial encounter. In addition, we will address the politics and processes involved in translating performance practices from one cultural context to another. Each students’ personal relationship to the material/experience will be integrated into study. Readings, discussions, and written work will focus heavily on topics and issues related to the main music/dance traditions that we are learning to perform this semester, though we may venture beyond those areas from time to time. The course will explore both "traditional" and "popular" styles, leading us to question those categories.

There is an informal audition for this course. No experience is expected, just come to the first evening class meeting (5:15) ready to sing and dance (in groups).

Co-Prerequisite: MUEN 3690

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

MUSI 3320: Theory II

Peter D'Elia / Victor Szabo
3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1: Peter D'Elia / MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11339

Lecture / Section 2: Victor Szabo / MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11338

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significant compositions by period composers.

Co-requisite: MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336.

MUSI 3332, 3334 and 3336: Musicianship I, II and III

1.0 credit

These lab courses give practical experience with many aspects of
musical perception, performance, and creation. These will include
sight-reading and sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and
harmony; aural identification of intervals, chords, and rhythmic
patterns; and exercises in musical memory and improvisation. Students
entering the sequence take a test to determine the appropriate level of
their first course. At the end of each course, students take a placement
test to determine whether they may enter a higher level course. Courses
may be repeated for credit, but each course may be counted toward the
major only once. MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336 are co-requisites for MUSI
3310, 3320, and 4331. This means that students pre-registering in the
latter courses must also pre-register in MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336
unless they have already taken the highest level course and have been
passed out of further co-requisite requirements. Students interested in
taking Musicianship but not Theory are encouraged to register for MUSI
3332, 3334, or 3336 as space permits. Such students may not
pre-register. They should plan to register by adding in Fall after
taking a placement exam.

MUSI 3332: Musicianship I

Steve Kemper
Lecture: MW / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11340

MUSI 3334: Musicianship II

Amy Coddington
Lecture: WF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11341

MUSI 3336: Musicianship III

Adam Carter
Lecture: M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012 and F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11342

MUSI 3370 Songwriting

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 16091

The goal of this course is to delve into songwriting; to develop aural, analytic and creative abilities and to join them together in understanding and composing songs. Students will learn about rhythm, melodic design, harmonic progression, lyrics and song forms. We will consider examples from a broad musical spectrum: blues, folk, art song, musicals, R & B, rock & roll, hip hop. Students will also perform songs they have composed during the semester.

MUSI 3390: Introduction to Music & Computers

Judith Shatin 
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19919

Lab Sections:

Section 100 (Braxton Sherouse): M / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 21193

Section 101 (Braxton Sherouse): M / 12:00-12:50 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 21194

Section 102 (Braxton Sherouse): W / 10:00-10:50 pm / OCH B011 
Class Number: 21195

MUSI 3390 will introduce you to the dynamic field of computer music, focusing in particular on soundscape composition, involving composition with recordings made in the field,using these to increase our awareness of place and context.Soundscape compositions can develop our awareness of the environment in which the original sounds are situated, as well as stimulate curiosity about the culture(s) or place(s) they reflect. You will also gain theoretical, practical and historical knowledge of electronic and digital music. Topics include acoustics, recording, multitrack audio, digital signal processing (DSP), and MIDI. The readings will cover aspects of the history of electronic and computer music, as well as an introduction to the traditions of soundscape composition. We will also consider issues including sonic appropriation, and elementsof form in digital composition. Listening and analysis assignments will provide a framework forunderstanding a variety of compositional approaches as well, including acousmatic and electroacoustic. Thisknowledge will be brought to bear on the practice of composition, incorporating recordings you will makeas well as process. You will complete weekly assignments, including several smaller composition projects, before turning to a more extended final project. MUSI339 counts for the composition component of the Music Major. Programs to be used include Logic Pro and Sound Hack. We will be working onthe Mac platform, though the concepts you learn will be broadly applicable. Note that you MUST REGISTER for the Lab (0 credits) as well as registering for the course.

MUSI 3559: EcoAcoustics

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19920

Ecoacoustics explores the intersection between environmentalism and music. In the seminar we examine the acoustic characteristics of our environment, and analyze human-environmental interaction using scientific measurement and observations of the sounding world. We will experiment with specialized audio recording techniques and equipment. We will employ analysis software to explore complex human-nature dialectics, and editing/tracking software to compose our own ecoacoustic compositions. Ecoacoustics as a musical genre engages with environmental energy as composition. Students in this seminar will create their own ecoacoustic sound works as we study seminal works from the musical and artistic fields of acoustic ecology, sonology, soundscape composition, sonification, earthwork art, and deep listening. We will analyze music by composers who responded to natural phenomena, as well as those practicing ecoacoustic composition. This class may meet the composition requirement for the Major.

MUSI 4535:
Interactive Media: Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE)

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 5:00-6:15 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: TBA

Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE) is an advanced seminar in music composition, interactive software programming, and performance. The class explores the theoretical and practical aspects of composing and performing real-time interactive music with computers. In this class we engage with the computer as a musical collaborator. Emphasis is placed on gaining a deeper and more personal understanding of the possibilities of real time music technology. The class creates the Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE), and will perform with and compose for the MICE while gaining skills in human-computer interaction. We will emphasize performance and so instrumental/vocal musicians, even those without significant composition or computer programming experience, are also encouraged to join the class. MUSI 4350 will meet the composition requirement for the Major.

MUSI 4509: Cultural and Historical Studies: Music in Jefferson's America

Bonnie Gordon
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 1100 am-12:15 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19922

It is no secret at the University of Virginia that Thomas Jefferson played the violin well, claimed to practice three hours a day, and owned some very impressive harpsichords. Music was, in his own words, “the favorite passion of my soul.” This interdisciplinary seminar aims to explore new and interdisciplinary directions for the study of music making and soundscapes in 1late 18th and early 19th century America. The seminar takes the materials in UVa’s special collection as a point of departure for an interdisciplinary and collaborative investigation of music in Jefferson’s America. Primary source materials include scrapbooks, sheet music, bound volumes, broadsides, and slave narratives. Secondary source readings will center on issues of music as a historically constructed activity, blackface, theater in the American South. Theoretical readings will draw on critical race theory, feminist theory, and cultural studies approaches to music making. Because the primary sources are virtually unexplored students will have the opportunity to do innovative and original source work and present it publically. Students will write weekly response papers and a term paper based on primary sources. They will also participate in a symposium on Jefferson’s Soundscapes in early April.

MUSI 4510: Cultural and Historical Studies: Analysis & Interpretation of Popular Music

Fred Maus 
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12590

Analysis and Interpretation of Popular Music. This course teaches skills in the musical analysis of popular music. At many points, we will compare analytical tools for popular music and classical music. In conjunction with analysis, we will consider experiential issues of perception, time, and repetition. In addition, we will consider issues of popular music history and diversity.

Specific topics will include song forms in popular music; differences between form in classical and popular music; harmony and melody in pop songs; time and repetition, with specific analysis of funk and techno; expression and meaning. Students in the course should have completed Theory 1.

MUSI 4520: Critical Studies of Music:
Music and War

Scott DeVeaux
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 15821

 

MUSI 4760: Choral Conducting II

Michael Slon
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19923

Continued studies in the art of conducting, with weekly experience conducting a small choral ensemble. Areas of study include further mastery of rehearsal technique, baton/hand technique, elements of expression (including facial expression and gestural variation), left hand facility, and aural awareness – and in conjunction, emphasis on a more advanced understanding of score study and analysis, score reading, and aspects of performance practice related to choral genre and historical context. Instructor permission required. This class satisfies elective and/or performance credits for the music major.

Graduate Courses

MUSI 7502: Studies in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Music: Mozart and Media

Richard Will
3.0 credits
Lecture: R / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008 
Class Number: 19925

 

MUSI 7520: Current Studies in Research and Criticism: Music and Gender

Bonnie Gordon
3.0 credits
Lecture: T / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008 
Class Number: 19926

 

MUSI 7526: Performing Antiquities and Modernities

Michelle Kisliuk 
3.0 credits
Lecture: W / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19927

 

MUSI 7547: Materials of Contemporary Music

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: M / 3:30-6:00 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19928

In this seminar we will examine works of composers and performance artists by parsing their transmissive networks into domains of space, performance technologies, protocols, rituals of pre- and post-performance, apparent sponsorship, &c. We will consider how transmissive networks locate cultural products in social space, and how we might creatively reassemble this situation to our own ends. Readings will be drawn from critical theory, cybernetics, semiotics, media, theory, postmodern theory, sociology of arts and culture, and more. Participants will write a short paper, make in-class presentations, and realize "in public" compositions, installations and performance pieces informed by issues raised in the seminar.

MUSI 7581: Composition

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits
Lecture: W / 3:30-5:45 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 19930

In this seminar we will consider the concept of counterpoint and its evolution and application in Renaissance polyphony, Baroque and Contemporary music. We will examine changing concepts of dissonance and its relation to temporal design, the changes in theoretical presentations, and the continued role of counterpoint in non-tonal frameworks. Coursework will include compositional exercises, analysis, and performance.

MUSI 8820: Advanced Composition

3.0 credits

MUSI 8840: Advanced Computer Music Composition

3.0 credits

MUSI 8910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by first-year graduate students.

MUSI 8920: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by first-year graduate students.

MUSI 8960: Thesis

3.0 credits

MUSI 8993: Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits

MUSI 8998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

MUSI 8999: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

MUSI 9010: Directed Readings

3.0 credits

MUSI 9020: Directed Readings

3.0 credits

MUSI 9910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

MUSI 9920: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

MUSI 9940: Independent Research

3.0 credits

 

MUSI 9998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.

MUSI 9999: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.

 

Music Ensembles and Performance Instruction

For information on auditions, please visit our auditions website.

MUBD 2601: Basketball Band

Bill Pease
1.0 credits
Lecture: TW / 6:00-8:00 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 14651

MUEN 2600: Concert Band

Andrew Koch 
1.0 credits
Lecture: M / 6:00-7:45 pm, Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 11226

MUEN 3690 and 4690: African Music and Dance Ensemble

(registration number depends on student seniority in the ensemble)

Michelle Kisliuk
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 5:00-7:15 pm / OCH 107

MUEN 3690 / Level II
Class Number:
 TBA

MUEN 4690 / Level III
Class Number:
 15838

The African Music and Dance Ensemble is a practical, hands-on course focusing on several music/dance forms from Western and Central Africa with performances during and at the end of the semester. Though no previous experience with music or dance is required, we will give special attention to developing tight ensemble dynamics, aural musicianship, and a polymetric sensibility. Concentration, practice, and faithful attendance are required of each class member, the goal being to develop an ongoing U.Va. African Music and Dance Ensemble.

MUEN 3600: Jazz Ensemble

John D'earth
2.0 credits
Lecture: MR / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11227

Led by internationally recognized jazz trumpeter/composer John D'earth, the Jazz Ensemble is a full-sized jazz big band performing the entire range of the jazz tradition (swing, bop, fusion) There is also a focus on “head arrangements,” group improvisation, world music and original compositions from within the band. You'll gain valuable experience in ensemble playing and in the art of solo improvisation. Private instruction in jazz improvisation and the opportunity to perform in small combos are offered in conjunction with this class. The Jazz Ensemble has presented guest artist concerts/residencies with such major figures as Michael Brecker, Joe Henderson, John Abercrombie, David Leibman, Bob Moses, Clark Terry, and Terrence Blanchard, among many others.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3610: Orchestra

Kate Tamarkin, Conductor 
2.0 credits

Strings

Lecture / Section 100: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 13231

Sectionals: M / 5:30-7:00 pm

Section 101: Pete Spaar (Double Bass) / OCH B012
Class Number: 11230

Section 103: Ayn Balija (Viola) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11231

Section 104: Daniel Sender (Violin) / OCH 107
Class Number: 11232

Section 105: David Sariti (Violin) / OCH B018
Class Number:11233

Section 106: Adam Carter (Cello) / OCH S004
Class Number: 15091

Brass / Woodwinds / Percussion

Lecture / Section 200: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11229

Sectionals: W / 5:15-6:15 pm

Section 201: Elizabeth Roberts (Bassoon) / OCH B020
Class Number: 11234

Section 202: Rob Patterson (Clarinet) / TBA 
Class Number: 11235

Section 203: Kelly Sulick (Flute) / TBA
Class Number: 11236

Section 204: Susan Fritts (Horn) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11237

Section 205: Aaron Hill (Oboe) / TBA
Class Number: 11238

Section 206: I-Jen Fang (Percussion) / B018
Class Number: 11239

Section 207: Nathan Dishman (Trombone) / S004
Class Number: 11240

Section 208: Paul Neebe (Trumpet) / OCH 107
Class Number: 11241

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3620: Wind Ensemble

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: M / 8:00-10:00 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 12582

The Wind Ensemble is a 45-member ensemble that features the most outstanding brass, woodwind, and percussion players at the University. The focus of this ensemble is to explore new literature as well as perform the masterworks of the wind band era. The wind ensemble also works with outstanding guest performers and conductors. This group is predominately made up of non-music majors who enjoy the genre of the wind band. Open to all University of Virginia students, auditions are held prior to the start of each semester. For more information on the Wind Ensemble, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/ensembles/windensemble/.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 1: Percussion Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11242

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Re-established in spring 2005 by I-Jen Fang, principal timpanist and percussionist with CUSO, the Percussion Ensemble is a chamber group that performs literature ranging from classical transcriptions to contemporary music. The ensemble draws upon a large family of pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments, and the number of players and amount of equipment varies greatly from piece to piece. Music reading skills and basic percussion technique on all percussion instruments is required. Previous percussion ensemble experience is highly recommended. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

MUEN 3630, Section 2: Woodwind Ensemble

Elizabeth Roberts
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11243

Explore, rehearse and perform woodwind chamber music, including both standard and more obscure works. Focus on developing chamber music playing skills, learning the tendencies of the woodwind instruments, developing musicianship, and enjoying making and sharing music! Instructor permission and audition required.

MUEN 3630, Section 3: Trombone Ensemble

Nathan Dishman
1.0 credit
Lecture: F / 4:00-5:30 / OCH B012
Class Number: 11244

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition. Contact Nathan Dishman (createEmail('nathandishman', 'yahoo.com');) to schedule an audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 5: Flute Ensemble

Kelly Sulick
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11246

MUEN 3630: Section 6: Double Reed Ensemble

Aaron Hill
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11247

MUEN 3630: Section 7: Clarinet Ensemble

Rob Patterson
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11248

MUEN 3630, Section 8: Brass Quintet

Paul Neebe 
1.0 credit
Lecture: W / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11249

MUEN 3630: Jazz Chamber Ensemble

1.0 credit

Lecture / Section 10: Pete Spaar / R / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11250

Lecture / Section 11: Mike Rosensky / T / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11251

Lecture / Section 12: Jeff Decker / F / 2:00-3:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11252

Lecture / Section 13: Peter Spaar / F / 12:30-2:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11253

MUEN 3630, Section 14: Chamber Music Ensemble

Mimi Tung 
1.0 credits, Instructor permission by audition 
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11254

MUEN 3630, Section 15: Chamber Music Ensemble

Daniel Sender
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition 
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11255

 

MUEN 3630, Section 16: Palladian Chamber Orchestra

David Sariti 
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition 
Lecture: R / 5:00-6:30 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11256

 

MUEN 3630, Section 17: Chamber Music Ensemble

Ayn Balija
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition 
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11257

MUEN 3630, Section 18: Chamber Music Ensemble

Adam Carter 
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition 
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11258

MUEN 3630, Section 19: Horn Ensemble

Susan Fritts 
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 15839

MUEN 3650: University Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11260

The University Singers is the University's premier SATB ensemble, performing a cappella and accompanied choral literature ranging from chant to the works of contemporary composers. Past repertoire has included Bernstein's Chichester Psalms, the Brahms Requiem, Handel's Messiah, and Mozart's Mass in C minor, as well as shorter a cappella and accompanied works, including a recent co-commission from Eric Whitacre. Recent trips have taken the group to Atlanta, Charlotte, New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Cincinnati, and the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., as well as the campuses of other American universities for collaborative concerts. The group has also been heard on European tours in England, Italy, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland. Recent highlights have included performances with the Charlottesville & University Symphony Orchestra, a workshop with Bobby McFerrin, performances of the Bach Mass in B minor, and a concert tour of the Midwest.

Students in the University Singers come from all six of UVA's undergraduate schools, including Arts and Sciences, Education, and Engineering, as well as several of the University's graduate and professional schools. Together, they enjoy an esprit de corps that arises from the pursuit of musical excellence and the camaraderie the singers develop offstage.

All singers at the University - undergraduates, graduate students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to audition. University Singers is offered for two hours academic credit. Michael Slon, who has conducted choruses at the Oberlin Conservatory and Indiana University School of Music, is the conductor. For more information on the University Singers, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/usingers/. Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3651: Chamber Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: F / 1:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11259

Chamber Singers is a select ensemble drawn from the University Singers. The ensemble meets once a week and focuses on music for chamber choir ranging from the Renaissance to contemporary pieces. Recent performances have included the Palestrina Missa Brevis, Britten's Hymn to St. Cecilia, and Bach's Cantata 150, as well as contemporary works by Meredith Monk and Eric Whitacre, and arrangements of classic jazz standards by Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, and the King's Singers. Interested singers will be considered for the chamber ensemble as part of their University Singers audition.

Restricted to: Instructor permission

MUEN 3670: Early Music Ensemble: Baroque Orchestra

David Sariti 
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 7:30-9:00 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12583

The Baroque Orchestra, directed by David Sariti, offers students the rare opportunity to perform music of the 17th and 18th centuries on the instruments for which it was written, at low pitch. Students use period instruments from the University's extensive collection, receiving personal instruction on the special techniques necessary, and must be accomplished on their modern counterparts.

MUEN 3680: New Music Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11261

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Performance of vocal and instrumental music of the twentieth century.

A one-credit course at the University of Virginia, the New Music Ensemble explores and performs exciting music of our time. The ensemble consists of dedicated instrumentalists, singers and UVa performance faculty. We perform a wide variety of contemporary music suitable to our instrumentation, including new works created by UVa composers.

The New Music Ensemble seeks dedicated instrumentalists and singers to explore and perform a wide variety of contemporary music. To audition, come to the first class with your instrument. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

Open to UVA students, community musicians and advanced high school students.

Private Performance Instruction

For more information on registration procedures, please visit the lessons website.

Lesson Levels

There are three levels of private performance instruction.

200-level

For students playing at a beginner to intermediate level or with limited time to practice. One hour or one-half hour lessons, CR/NC (pass-fail), ½ or 1 credit. No jury, but optional performance opportunities will be available. Individual instructors may, as they wish, set definite performance requirements for their students. A limited number of scholarships may be possible, as funding permits, but normally students at this level should expect to pay for their lessons.

300-level

Advanced performance, for students working at the level of a music major, though not necessarily majoring in music. Prerequisite: at least one semester of 200-level study and a successful audition. Normally auditions take place during fall or spring juries; if this is not possible, students audition at the beginning of the semester. One hour lessons, graded, 2 credits. Students at this level should make a time-commitment to practicing appropriate for major-level study. We suggest a norm of at least 6 hours/week, though individual performance instructors may set a different (lower or higher) expectation of practice time as appropriate. Students play a jury at the end of the semester. Students at this level are often on scholarship, but scholarship support is always contingent on availability of funds.

400-level

Honors performance, to be taken for two semesters, by fourth year students preparing a senior recital or, in cases of unusual ability, by students preparing a full recital to be given before their fourth year. Prerequisite: 300-level study, successful written application in the semester before enrolling, and a successful audition (to be included in juries) at the end of the semester before applying. One hour lessons, graded, 2 credits. Jury at the end of the first semester, recital near the end of the second semester. Normally on scholarship, but scholarship support is always contingent on availability of funds.

Offerings

Lessons are offered in the following areas (See the Course Catalog for complete listings):

* Voice
* Piano, Organ, and Harpsichord
* Violin, Viola, Cello, Doublebass
* Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, English Horn, Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Bassoon, Contra-Bassoon
* Trombone, Trumpet, Tuba, French Horn, Saxophone, Jazz Improv
* Percussion, Jazz Drumming, Tabla, Afro-Cuban perucssion
* Guitar, Chapman Stick, Banjo, Harp, Mandolin
* Supervised Performance (For students involved in types of solo or ensemble performance not offered through the department.

 

Summer 2012

Undergraduate Academic Courses

Session I: May 14 - June 7

MUSI 2570 / 3090: Performance in Africa

Michelle Kisliuk
3.0 credits
MTWRF 10:00am-12:45 pm, Hunter Smith Band Building

This course explores performance in Africa through reading, discussion, audio and video examples, and hands-on practice. This is an academic course that integrates reading, writing and discussion with practical study. Practical work as learner and performer is crucial to the overall work in the course (no experience is expected). We will explore African music/dance styles, their sociomusical circumstances and processes, as well as performed resistances and responses to the colonial and post/neo-colonial encounter. In addition, we will address the politics and processes involved in translating performance practices from one cultural context to another. Each students’ personal relationship to the material/experience will be integrated into study.

Readings, discussions, and written work will focus heavily on topics and issues related to the main music/dance traditions that we are learning to perform each day, though we may venture beyond those areas from time to time. The course will explore both "traditional" and "popular" styles, leading us to question those categories. Those enrolled in the 3000 level will have some reading and writing/discussion work beyond those in the 2000 level.

The syllabus will be updated daily as the session evolves, based on student interests and the direction of discussion.

Session II: June 11 - July 5

MUSI 2120 / 3120: History of Jazz Music

John D'earth
3.0 credits
MTWRF 1:00-3:15 pm, Old Cabell B012

An in-depth look at the way jazz musicians listen to music. What do they listen for? How do they use great jazz perfomances to grow as musicians and improvising artists? What skills are required to develop timing, phrasing, and musical creativity? The course will examine the recorded work of major jazz artists, explore the “inner hearing” of musicians with participatory exercises in rhythm, melody and movement, and demonstrate the processes by which jazz musicians master theory, musical structure, and their instruments. No previous jazz experience necessary. Taught by jazz trumpeter and composer John D’earth (Buddy Rich, Lionel Hampton, Bruce Hornsby, Miles Davis/Quincy Jones, The Kronos String Quartet, Dave Matthews; D’earth’s career is documented in Oxford’s Biographical Encyclopedia of Jazz by Leonard Feather and Ira Gitler.)

MUSI 2390 / 3390: Music and Computers

Yuri Spitsyn
3.0 credits
MTWRF 1:00-3:15 pm, Wilson 235

MUSI 2390/3390 will introduce you to the dynamic field of computer music. You will learn about topics including acoustics; digital sound, editing, and processing; recording and multi-track mixing; and MIDI. You will also learn about the historical evolution of electronic and computer music, and will study selected examples of both. We will cover elements of compositional design and hear them applied in a range of styles. You will have ample hands-on experience, and the opportunity to create original music. This course counts for the composition component of the Music Major. Programs to be used include Bias Peak, Frequency, Digital performer and Sound Hack. We will be working on the Mac platform, though the concepts you learn will be broadly applicable.

MUSI 2570 / 4509: Gender, Sexuality and Race in Music Videos

Matthew Jones
3.0 credits
MTWRF 10:00am-12:45 pm, Fayerweather 215

This course introduces students to a variety of analytical methods for the study of music video. Drawing on work in music, feminist, queer, media, and critical race studies, students develop paradigms for understanding and interpreting representations of subjectivity and identity in music videos and music on television more generally. The course is heavily oriented toward discussion of readings and video examples, and students compose an analytical final paper on a topic of their choice. No musical training/music theory knowledge is necessary or required for this course. The 4509 course will count towards the Music Major, and require a slightly longer paper.

Session III: July 9 - August 1

MUSI 1310: Basic Musical Skills

Aurie Hsu
3.0 credits
MTWRF 1:00-3:15 pm, Hunter Smith Band Building

Have you ever wanted to read sheet music, write a melody or rhythm, or compose a basic score for other musicians? What do pop songs, film scores, symphonies, the Beatles, and Mozart all have in common? What is the music around you - on ipods, at concerts, at ballgames - “made of”? The basic concepts of European-American music lie at the center of each of these questions. You use the same basic musical skills whether you’re a beginning songwriter, Pulitzer prize composer, Grammy-nominated artist, or simply have an interest in the building blocks of music.

MUSI 1310 is an introductory course that combines basic music theory with in-class interactive exercises. Written exercises are designed to develop your fluency in music terminology and notation. Topics include pitch, rhythm, intervals, meter, keys, scales, triads, and building and recognizing melodies and harmonic progressions. We will practice basic aural skills connected to these theoretical principles. Listening assignments and analysis will also promote your understanding of how the elements work together in diverse pieces of music.

Student responsibilities include readings, written and listening assignments, in-class discussion and performance (clapping, singing, etc.), quizzes, concert review, exams, and a final composition project.

MUSI 2070 / 4519: Popular Musics

Emily Gale
3.0 credits
MTWRF 10:30-12:45 pm, Gibson 211

People seem to either love or hate popular music; mention Lady Gaga at a party and you’ll get a response! But what is Popular Music and where does it come from?

From its place in the theaters of vaudeville to the stadiums of arena rock, from muzak to the ipod, popular music has pervaded the soundscapes of the long twentieth century. This course surveys forms of Popular Music in North America from minstrelsy in the nineteenth century through to recent tracks by Lady Gaga and R. Kelly. In this class we will listen to popular genres including Blues, Country, Rock’n’Roll, and Hip Hop and consider topics such as love songs and protest music. We will discuss issues that have occupied popular musicians, scholars, and critics including the appropriation of African-American musical styles, the music business and mass culture, the relationship between popular music and identity, and how technology has affected both the production and consumption of music. Through extensive listening assignments, students will become familiar with hit songs and landmark recordings. Students will also be responsible for reading and writing assignments, in-class discussion, exams, and a final paper. For students in 2070, no previous knowledge of music is required.

MUSI 2340: Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
3.0 credits
MTWRF 1:00-2:30 pm, Old Cabell B018

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns. This course will follow my book "Learn To Groove" and can include music students, non music students and is open to students of all skill levels. The course requires that students have or purchase a hand drum of their own. Congas, bongos, djembes, doumbeks or any other hand drums are appropriate.


Address

McIntire Department of Music
112 Old Cabell Hall
P.O. Box 400176 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4176

Email: music@virginia.edu