2013-2014 Courses

Fall 2013

Undergraduate Courses 

MUSI 1040 Exploring the Orchestra

Kate Tamarkin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 16316

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Gretchen Michelson): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 16317

Section 102 (Gretchen Michelson): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 16318

Section 103 (Gretchen Michelson): F / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 16319

An introduction to the tradition and repertory of the symphony orchestra. Topics include the development and instrumental makeup of the modern symphony orchestra, forms and genres, and the role of the conductor.

MUSI 1070 Global Music

Nomita Dave
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:20 pm/ OCH 113
Class Number: 20573

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Steven Lewis): M / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 20574

Section 102 (Steven Lewis): M / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 20575

Section 103 (Steven Lewis): M / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 20576

This introductory course examines the encounters of people and music as they travel in multiple directions and pathways across the globe. We will consider examples such as the global consumption of Korean and Japanese pop songs; musical exchanges and influences back-and-forth between West Africa and the United States; and new forms of Islamic music across the Muslim world. We will also consider issues of globalization, migration, technological change and celebrity, as they relate to music and musicians. No prior musical experience is necessary.

MUSI 1310 Basic Musical Skills

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Kristina Warren): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11179

Lecture / Section 2 (Stephanie Gunst): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11180

Lecture / Section 3 (Matt Jones): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11181

Study of the rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music. Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of music required.

 

MUSI 1993 Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 2080 American Music

Joel Rubin
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-2:50 pm / Maury 104
Class Number: 15336

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Jarek Ervin): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 113 
Class Number:15337

Section 102 (Jarek Ervin): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number:15338

Section 103 (Jarek Ervin): F / 2:00-2:50 am / OCH 113 
Class Number:15339

American Music (“Roots Music of Multicultural America”) looks at American traditional and popular musics from a cross-cultural and multi-ethnic perspective. We will examine the traditions most often called “roots music,” including African-American blues and southern old-time string band music, which influenced the development of rock and roll and country and western. Broadening out from there, we will also study a wide range of other ethnic musical traditions, from Native American pow wows and Cajun to salsa, klezmer and Balkan-Gypsy-punk, which have influenced popular music-making of the past twenty-five years. Along the way we will treat a complex and shifting web of associated ideas, such as authenticity, heritage, nationalism, and multiculturalism, and the musical or music-marketing categories of folk, traditional, roots, world music, and indie rock. We will ask how “roots” traditions have fed into definitions of “American-ness” over the years, and whether recent trends represent signs of America’s transforming itself into a post-ethnic, post-racial society. This course is designed for non-music majors. There are no prerequisites, and musical literacy is not assumed.

MUSI 2110 Music in Everyday Life

Michelle Kisliuk
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19645

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Courtney Kleftis): W / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 19901

Section 102 (Courtney Kleftis): W / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 19902

Section 103 (Courtney Kleftis): W / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 19903

What is the soundscape of our quotidian (everyday) experience? How does it condition our consciousness, and what implicit cultural messages circulate within our ever-changing daily soundtracks? This course focuses our attention not on music highlighted in performance, but on that which we usually take for granted. A close look at how music works in our everyday lives can offer a new awareness of our ongoing experience, open us to choices we never thought we had, and get us wondering about the depths of aesthetic experience.

MUSI 2302 Keyboard Skills (Beginning)

2.0 credits, instructor permission

Lecture / Section 1 (John Mayhood): TR / 11:00-12:15 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 11183

Lecture / Section 2 (John Mayhood): TR / 12:30-1:45 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 15977

Introductory keyboard skills; includes sight-reading, improvisation, and accompaniment at the keyboard in a variety of styles. No previous knowledge of music required. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors.

MUSI 2308 Vocal Skills

Pam Beasley
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 4:00-4:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 20775

An introductory course to basic vocal technique; discussion to include those elements essential for healthy singing in a variety of styles. Will involve group and solo singing to apply these elements. No previous voice training or musical background required.

MUSI 2340 Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1: MW / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 12097

Lecture / Section 2: MW / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 14573

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns. This course will follow my book "Learn To Groove" and can include music students, non music students and is open to students of all skill levels. The course requires that students have or purchase a hand drum of their own. Congas, bongos, djembes, doumbeks or any other hand drums are appropriate.

MUSI 2350 Technosonics: Digital Music and Sound Art Composition

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 12:00-12:50 / Maury Hall 209
Class Number: 15677

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Jon Bellona): M / 9:00-9:50 am / Wilson 306 
Class Number: 15678

Section 102 (Jon Bellona): M / 10:00-10:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 15679

Section 103 (Jon Bellona): M / 11:00-11:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 15680

Section 104 (Paul Turowski): R / 9:00-9:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 15681

Section 105 (Paul Turowski): R / 10:00-10:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 15682

Section 106 (Erik DeLuca): W / 11:00-11:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 15683

Section 107 (Amy Coddington): T / 10:00-10:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 15684

Section 108 (Amy Coddington): T / 9:00-9:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 15685

Section 109 (Paul Turowski): W / 2:00-2:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 15686

Section 110 (Erik DeLuca): W / 10:00-10:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 16332

Section 111 (Erik DeLuca): M / 2:00-2:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 16333

Section 112 (Amy Coddington): M / 3:00-3:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 16334

This class (www.technosonics.net) explores the history, theory and practice of digital music and sound art. Students learn tools and techniques of music technology that inform many genres and traditions. In addition to historical and theoretical concerns, students will experiment with digital tools for musical creation.

MUSI 2370 Making Rock

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-4:20 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 20784

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Chris Peck): W / 9:00-9:50 / WIL 306
Class Number: 20785

Section 102 (Chris Peck):  W / 12:00-12:50 / WIL 306
Class Number: 20786

Section 103 (Chris Peck):  W / 1:00-1:50 / WIL 306
Class Number: 20787

An introduction to rock from the 1950's to the present, comprising musical, cultural and technological histories and compositional projects, informed by the points of view and poetic processes of their makers. The course is organized around musical and poetic foundations such as the backbeat, affect, control vs. abandon, distortion, production, the solo, and lyric innovation. Creative assignments involve producing musical expressions of rock.

MUSI 2600 Jazz Improvisation

John D'earth
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 14261

MUSI 2993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 3030 Studies in Nineteenth-Century Music

TBA
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:45 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 16336

This course examines the history of 19th-century vocal and instrumental music. Looking closely at a range of musical works and writing about music, it addresses topics such as gender and domesticity, virtuosity and spectacle, nationalism and revolutionary politics, Romantic interiority, modernity and the urban, and monumentality.

MUSI 3050 Music and Discourse Since 1900

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 2 (Scott DeVeaux): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 16338

Studies the range of music that has flourished in the twentieth century, including modernist and post-modern art music, popular music, and world music, through historical, critical, and ethnographic approaches.

MUSI 3070 Intro to Musical Ethnography

Nomita Dave
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00 am -12:15 pm, OCH B012
Class Number: 16337

This course explores ways of examining and representing music and sound as a fundamentally social practice. Such an approach looks beyond the notes to study music as part of human social life and experience. Readings and listenings will focus on a number of genres and traditions from throughout the world, including singers in Nepali nightclubs, dance bands from Central Africa, Islamic pop songs, Moroccan trance, and country music from Texas. We will consider in depth the theories and methods involved in conducting research and writing about music as a social phenomenon, considering the roles and perspectives of musicians, listeners, markets and the media. We will also examine the role of the researcher, considering the ethical issues involved in representing music and culture from elsewhere.Students will have the opportunity to apply the methods we discuss in class in short assignments involving music-making in and around Charlottesville.

MUSI 3310 Theory I

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Kevin Davis): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11186

Lecture / Section 2 (Craig Comen): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11187

Lecture / Section 3 (TBA): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11188

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significant compositions by period composers. (Y)

MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336 Musicianship I, II and III

2.0 credit

These lab courses give practical experience with many aspects of musical perception, performance, and creation. These will include sight-reading and sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and harmony; aural identification of intervals, chords, and rhythmic patterns; and exercises in musical memory and improvisation. Students entering the sequence take a test to determine the appropriate level of their first course. At the end of each course, students take a placement test to determine whether they may enter a higher level course. Courses may be repeated for credit, but each course may be counted toward the major only once.

Students should sign-up in the lobby of Old Cabell Hall for an individual placement assessment that will last 5 minutes. These 5 minute time slots will be on Wedensday, August 28th from 12-2pm.

MUSI 3332 Musicianship I

Lecture / Section 1 (Adam Carter): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11190

Lecture / Section 2 (Kyle Chattleton): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11189

MUSI 3334 Musicianship II

Lecture (Jean Maroun): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11192

MUSI 3336 Musicianship III

Lecture (Peter D'Elia): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 11193

MUSI 3370 Songwriting

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 16339

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Ryan Maguire): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 16902

Section 102 (Ryan Maguire): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 16903

Section 103 (Ryan Maguire): F / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 16904

The goal of this course is to delve into songwriting; to develop your aural, analytic and creative abilities and to join them together in understanding and composing songs. You will learn about rhythm, melodic design, harmonic progression, lyrics and song forms. You will also work on eartraining, so that concepts you learn will be sonically meaningful. We will consider examples from a broad musical spectrum: blues, folk, tin pan alley, musicals, R & B, rock & roll, hip hop. We will also discuss the issues that songwriters encounter. You will have the opportunity to suggest songs for study, and some assignments will be done in groups. In these situations, we will organize groups that have complementary abilities for in-class performances. The Lab is a required part of the class, and you must sign up for a lab section. During the lab you will go over concepts we are covering in class, as well as work on additional eartraining, analysis and creative projects.

Prerequisites: MUSI 3310

Instructor Permission Required

MUSI 3390 Introduction to Music and Computers

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11195

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Max Tfirn): F / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 11197

Section 102 (Max Tfirn): F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 11196

Section 103 (Max Tfirn): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 11198

Introduction to Music and Computers in an upper-level introductory course in music technology. Students gain theoretical, historical and practical knowledge of electronic and computer music. An emphasis is placed on creative hands-on experience composing computer music.

Theoretical and practical topics include acoustics, recording, editing and mixing, MIDI, sound synthesis, and audio DSP. Programs used will include Audacity, Spear, SoundHack, Pro Tools, Logic, and MaxMSP. Note that you MUST register for the Lab (0 credits) as well as the course.

3390 fulfills the composition requirement of the Music Major. This is a composition class and most assignments are creative in nature.

MUSI 3559 Musicianship for Performers

Kate Tamarkin
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 20594
Prerequisite: Musicianship 3332 and Theory I

This course is designed to help performers apply musicianship skills to actual performance. Students are expected to play their instruments and/or sing regularly in class. Emphasis will be placed on developing musical “memory”, improving sight reading skills, recognizing and improvising to basic chord progressions, learning basic transpositions, and developing basic conducting skills. In addition, there will be an exploration of the process of developing an interpretation of a given piece. Students should be comfortable performing in class, both alone and in small groups.

MUSI 3993 Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 4331 Theory III

TBA
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 9:30-10:45 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11200

Studies in 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century techniques and styles through analysis and composition. Prerequisite: MUSI 3320 or instructor permission; Corequisite: MUSI 3332, 3334, or 3336, except for students who have already passed the exit test for MUSI 3336.

MUSI 4512 Studies in Jazz Literature

Scott DeVeaux
3.0 credits
Lecture: MWF / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19647

 

MUSI 4519 Critical Studies of Music
Topic: Thomas Jefferson and Black Noise

Bonnie Gordon
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00 am-12:15 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15687

Thomas Jefferson famously wrote that music is “the favorite passion of my soul.” He avidly collected music of the European tradition. But he mentioned Black sounds only twice in all of his writings and remained largely deaf to the music of the enslaved. This seminar uses music and sound as a Jeffersonian paradox; a man who championed liberty but denied African-Americans those rights by relegating them to the status of non human. The course uses primary and secondary sources to explore the written musical traditions of the European elite and the equally present oral traditions of the enslaved African-Americans. Theoretical readings will draw on critical race theory, feminist theory, and cultural studies approaches to music making. Because the primary sources are virtually unexplored, students will have the opportunity to do innovative and original sources. They will work on a variety of projects including soundscapes, performances, and a final paper. The seminar also considers the contemporary resonances of the Jefferson paradox through a service-learning segment in which students will engage with the Charlottesville community through performance, volunteer work, or public history. Individual projects will be crafted in part based on students’ prior musical knowledge and may include service.

MUSI 4582 Composition

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 21636

The focus of this course is on choral composition, with a combination of composition, analysis and performance. We will cover orchestrational elements such as vocal range, tessitura and both traditional and extended techniques and notations. You will have the opportunity to suggest pieces for study in addition to the wide range of repertoire already chosen for the class. We will begin with short compositional exercises, involving both improvisational and notated approaches, to be performed by the class. Over the course of the semester you will compose several more extended compositions (3-5 minute range). While this is not a conducting class per se, you will also have the opportunity to lead other members of the class in performing your pieces. And, we will collaborate where feasible with Professor Slon’s Choral Conducting class.

MUSI 4750 Choral Conducting I

Michael Slon
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19648

Studies in the basic technique and art of conducting, with weekly experience conducting repertoire with a small choral ensemble. Prerequisite: basic musicianship skills. Previous experience in a choral or instrumental ensemble is preferred, but not required. Interested students should consult with the instructor before registering. Instructor permission is required.

MUSI 4993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

Graduate Courses

MUSI 7511 Introduction to Research in Music

Richard Will
3.0 credits 
Lecture: T / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 11906

 

MUSI 7519 Current Studies in Rearch and Criticism

Topic: TBA
Bonnie Gordon
3.0 credits 
Lecture: R / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19649

 

MUSI 7524 Field Research and Ethnography of Performance

Michelle Kisliuk
3.0 credits 
Lecture: W / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19650

Writing ethnography is writing life. A redoubled attention to field experience is reshaping the nature of ethnographic inquiry, arising in particular ways within performance studies and ethnomusicology. This course serves as a graduate level introduction to field research and to ethnographic writing, via ethnomusicology and performance studies/theory. Working with and critiquing ideas such as those presented by Stoller, Clifford, Kirshenblatt-Gimblett and Schechner, we will spend the semester exploring epistemological, ethical, and aesthetic issues as they relate to field research, pushing the envelope of “creative non-fiction” in the ethnographic realm, including the idea of addressing ethnography within live performance itself. As a group we will discuss several recent ethnographic texts. By the end of the semester, students will have prepared their own preliminary ethnographies based in local field sites, and will share their research in class, either in conference- presentation style and/or as experimental performance.

MUSI 7540 Computer Sound Generation and Spatial Processing

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 5:00-6:15 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 19668

 

MUSI 7581 Composition

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19652

The focus of this course is on choral composition, with a combination of composition, analysis and performance. We will cover orchestrational elements such as vocal range, tessitura and both traditional and extended techniques and notations. You will have the opportunity to suggest pieces for study in addition to the wide range of repertoire already chosen for the class. We will begin with short compositional exercises, involving both improvisational and notated approaches, to be performed by the class. Over the course of the semester you will compose several more extended compositions (3-5 minute range). While this is not a conducting class per se, you will also have the opportunity to lead other members of the class in performing your pieces. And, we will collaborate where feasible with Professor Slon’s Choral Conducting class.

In addition to the materials covered in MUSI4581, you will be expected to study additional pieces from the contemporary repertoire. We will discuss their implications for your own compositions.

MUSI 8810: Advanced Composition

3.0 credits

MUSI 8910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits
Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by first-year graduate students.

MUSI 8960: Thesis

3.0 credits

MUSI 8993: Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits
Independent study dealing with a specific topic. Requirements will place primary emphasis on independent research.

MUSI 8998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

MUSI 9010: Directed Readings

3.0 credits

MUSI 9910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits
Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by second year graduate students.

MUSI 9930: Independent Research

3.0 credits
Research carried out by graduate student in consultation with an instructor.

MUSI 9998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits
Preliminary research directed towards a dissertation in consultation with an instructor.

MUSI 9999: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.

Ensembles

MUBD 2610, 2620, 2630 and 2640: Marching Band I-IV

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: TRF 6:00-8:20 pm

The Cavalier Marching Band is open to all students at the University of Virginia by audition. The band is comprised of members from nearly every major at UVA. A normal practice schedule is twice a week, with additional Friday practices on home game weeks. Attendance is mandatory at our band camp in August. There are no fees to be in the Cavalier marching Band. IF you are interested please contact the band office at 434.982.5347 or email William Pease.

MUEN 3690 and 4690 African Music and Dance Ensemble

(registration number depends on student seniority in the ensemble)

Michelle Kisliuk
2.0 credits
Lecture: T / 5:00-6:30 pm / OCH 107

MUEN 3690
Class Number:
 16661

MUEN 4690
Class Number:
 16662

The African Music and Dance Ensemble is a practical, hands-on course focusing on several music/dance forms from Western and Central Africa with performances during and at the end of the semester. Though no previous experience with music or dance is required, we will give special attention to developing tight ensemble dynamics, aural musicianship, and a polymetric sensibility. Concentration, practice, and faithful attendance are required of each class member, the goal being to develop an ongoing U.Va. African Music and Dance Ensemble.

MUEN 3600: Jazz Ensemble

John D'earth
2.0 credits
Lecture: MR / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11099

Led by internationally recognized jazz trumpeter/composer John D'earth, the Jazz Ensemble is a full-sized jazz big band, whose focus includes “head arrangements” group improvisation, world music and original compositions from within the band, along with music ranging from swing to bop to fusion. You'll gain valuable experience in ensemble playing and in the art of solo improvisation, and may take private instruction in jazz improvisation, perform in small combos and participate in jazz workshops held by such major figures as Michael Brecker, John Abercrombi, Dave Leibman, Bob Moses, Clark Terry, and Joe Henderson.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3610: Orchestra

Kate Tamarkin, Conductor
2.0 credits

Strings

Lecture / Section 100: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11100

Sectionals: M / 5:30-7:00 pm

Section 101: Pete Spaar (Double Bass) / OCH B012
Class Number: 11102

Section 102: Adam Carter (Cello) / OCH S004
Class Number: 11103

Section 103: Ayn Balija (Viola) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11104

Section 104: Daniel Sender (Violin) / OCH 107
Class Number: 11105

Section 105: David Sariti (Violin) / OCH B018
Class Number: 11106

Brass / Woodwinds / Percussion

Lecture / Section 200: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11101

Sectionals: W / 5:15-6:15 pm

Section 201: TBA (Horn) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11110

Section 202: Rob Patterson (Clarinet) / TBA 
Class Number: 11108

Section 203: Aaron Hill (Oboe) / TBA
Class Number: 11111

Section 204: Elizabeth Roberts (Bassoon) / OCH Studio B
Class Number: 11107

Section 205: Kelly Sulick (Flute) / OCH B019
Class Number: 11109

Section 206: Matt Ernst (Trumpet) / 107
Class Number: 11114

Section 207: Nathan Dishman (Trombone) / B012 
Class Number: 11113

Section 208: I-Jen Fang (Percussion) / B018
Class Number: 11112

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3620: Wind Ensemble

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: M / 6:45-9:00 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building / Room 200
Class Number: 11799

The Wind Ensemble is a 45-member ensemble that features the most outstanding brass, woodwind, and percussion players at the University. The focus of this ensemble is to explore new literature as well as perform the masterworks of the wind band era. The wind ensemble also works with outstanding guest performers and conductors. This group is predominately made up of non-music majors who enjoy the genre of the wind band. Open to all University of Virginia students, auditions are held prior to the start of each semester. For more information on the Wind Ensemble, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/ensembles/windensemble/.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 1: Chamber Music Ensemble

Daniel Sender
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11117

MUEN 3630, Section 2: Double Reed Ensemble

Aaron Hill
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11116

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 3: Flute Ensemble

Kelly Sulick
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11115

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 4: Woodwind Ensemble

Elizabeth Roberts
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11118

Explore, rehearse and perform woodwind chamber music, including both standard and more obscure works. Focus on developing chamber music playing skills, learning the tendencies of the woodwind instruments, developing musicianship, and enjoying making and sharing music! Instructor permission and audition required.

MUEN 3630, Section 5: Brass Quintet

Matt Ernst
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11120

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630: Jazz Chamber Ensemble

1.0 credit

Lecture / Section 7: Pete Spaar / R / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11124

Lecture / Section 12: Pete Spaar / F / 12:30-2:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11125

Lecture / Section 21: Mike Rosensky / T / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 12098

Lecture / Section 22: Jeff Decker / F / 2:00-3:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 12099

MUEN 3630, Section 8: Horn Ensemble

TBA
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11119

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 9: Klezmer Ensemble

Joel Rubin
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH 113 
Class Number: 11122

Klezmer, originally the ritual and celebratory music of the Yiddish-speaking Jews of Eastern Europe, was brought to North America by immigrants around the turn of the last century. Since the 1970s, a dynamic revival of this tradition has been taking place in America and beyond. Klezmer’s recent popularity has brought it far from its roots in medieval minstrelsy and Jewish ritual and into the sphere of mainstream culture. The traditional klezmer style presents the experienced instrumentalist with a range of technical challenges with its characteristic note bends, rubati, Baroque-style embellishments and other micro-improvisational techniques, opening up a world of expressive possibilities not available to them from either classical music or jazz. This music was passed on orally from generation to generation, and many of the ornaments which are so integral to the klezmer sound can only be approximated by Western staff notation – not to mention the patterns of improvised variation which are the cornerstone of the style. There will therefore be an emphasis on learning by ear as much as possible, but we will be using music in the form of lead sheets and other written instructional materials to supplement sound examples.

The class focuses on the study and performance of various traditions, including the klezmer traditions of New York between the two world wars, 19th century Eastern Europe, as well as original contemporary compositions. Emphasis will be on learning by ear, improvisation within a modal context, and learning to develop a cohesive ensemble sound. Concentration, practice, and good attendance are required of each ensemble member.

Admission is by audition during first class period of semester or prior to that, by appointment with the instructor.

MUEN 3630, Section 10: Percussion Chamber Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 9:30-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 11123

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Re-established in spring 2005 by I-Jen Fang, principal timpanist and percussionist with CUSO, the Percussion Ensemble is a chamber group that performs literature ranging from classical transcriptions to contemporary music. The ensemble draws upon a large family of pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments, and the number of players and amount of equipment varies greatly from piece to piece. Music reading skills and basic percussion technique on all percussion instruments is required. Previous percussion ensemble experience is highly recommended. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

MUEN 3630, Section 15: Trombone Ensemble

Nathan Dishman
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11121

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition. Contact Nathan Dishman to schedule an audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 16: Clarinet Ensemble

Rob Paterson
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11126

MUEN 3630, Section 17: Chamber Music Ensemble

Ayn Balija
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11127

MUEN 3630, Section 18: Chamber Music Ensemble

David Sariti
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: R / 5:00-6:30 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11128

MUEN 3630, Section 20: Chamber Music Ensemble

Adam Carter
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11129

MUEN 3630, Section 23: Chamber Music Ensemble

Mimi Tung
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 12636

MUEN 3630, Section 24: Blue Grass

Richard Will
1.0 credit, Instructor permission
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 20647

MUEN 3650: University Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11131

The University Singers is the University's premier SATB ensemble, performing a cappella and accompanied choral literature ranging from chant to the works of contemporary composers. Past repertoire has included Bach's Mass in B minor, Orff's Carmina Burana, the Duruflé Requiem, and Bernstein's Chichester Psalms, as well as shorter a cappella works. Recent trips have taken the group to Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Cincinnati, New Orleans, New York City, Philadelphia, and the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., as well as the campuses of other American universities for collaborative concerts. The group has also been heard on European tours in England, Italy, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland. Recent highlights have included performances with the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia, a concert and workshop with Bobby McFerrin, and a concert tour of the Southeastern U.S.

Students in the University Singers come from all six of UVA's undergraduate schools, including Arts and Sciences, Education, and Engineering, as well as several of the University's graduate and professional schools. Together, they enjoy an esprit de corps that arises from the pursuit of musical excellence and the camaraderie the singers develop offstage.

All singers at the University - undergraduates, graduate students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to audition. University Singers is offered for two hours academic credit. Michael Slon, who has conducted choruses at the Oberlin Conservatory and Indiana University School of Music, is the conductor. For more information on the University Singers, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/usingers/

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3651: Chamber Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: F / 1:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11130

Chamber Singers is a select ensemble drawn from the University Singers. The ensemble meets once a week and focuses on music for chamber choir ranging from the Renaissance to contemporary pieces. Recent performances have included the Monteverdi Mass for 4 voices (1651), Britten'sHymn to St. Cecilia, and Bach's Cantata 150, as well as contemporary works by Meredith Monk and Eric Whitacre, and arrangements of classic jazz standards by Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, and the King's Singers. Interested singers will be considered for the chamber ensemble as part of their University Singers audition. For more information, please visit our webpage.

Restricted to: Instructor permission

MUEN 3670: Early Music Ensemble: Baroque Orchestra

David Sariti
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 7:30-9:00 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11907

The Baroque Orchestra, directed by David Sariti, offers students the rare opportunity to perform music of the 17th and 18th centuries on the instruments for which it was written, at low pitch. Students use period instruments from the University's extensive collection, receiving personal instruction on the special techniques necessary, and must be accomplished on their modern counterparts.

MUEN 3680: New Music Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 3:45-5:15 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11132

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Performance of vocal and instrumental music of the twentieth century.

A one-credit course at the University of Virginia, the New Music Ensemble explores and performs exciting music of our time. The ensemble consists of dedicated instrumentalists, singers and UVa performance faculty. We perform a wide variety of contemporary music suitable to our instrumentation, including new works created by UVa composers.

The New Music Ensemble seeks dedicated instrumentalists and singers to explore and perform a wide variety of contemporary music. To audition, come to the first class with your instrument. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

Open to UVA students, community musicians and advanced high school students.

 

Spring 2014

Undergraduate Courses

MUSI 1010 Introduction to Music

Emily Gale
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-11:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 15771

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Courtney Kleftis): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 15772

Section 102 (Courtney Kleftis): R / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 15773

Section 103 (Courtney Kleftis): R / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 15774

Surveys the musical literatures that make up the common listening experience of contemporary Americans, emphasizing such “classical” repertories as symphony, opera, “early music”, “new music,” blues, and jazz. Teaches effective ways of listening to and thinking critically about each repertoire. Considers how musical choices reflect or create cultural identities, including attitudes toward gender, ethnicity, social relationships, and ideas of the sacred.

MUSI 1310 Basic Musical Skills

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Vic Szabo): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11166

Lecture / Section 2 (Jon Bellona): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11167

Lecture / Section 3 (Jean Maroun): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11165

Study of the rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music.  Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of music required.

MUSI 1620 History of the Wind Band

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: T / 2:00-3:40 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 14526

MUSI 1993 Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 2070 Popular Music

Stephanie Doktor
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:20 pm / Wilson 301
Class Number: 20214

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Kyle Chattleton): W / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 20215

Section 102 (Kyle Chattleton): W / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 20216

Section 103 (Kyle Chattleton): W / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 20217

Section 104 (Jarek Ervin): F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 20218

Section 105 (Jarek Ervin): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 20219

Section 106 (Jarek Ervin): F / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 20220

Why does popular culture get such a bad rap? Why do we praise bands for being “alternative” and “indie” and ridicule them when they go mainstream? Why was Eminem named the “King of Hip-Hop,” Elvis the “King of Rock ‘n’ Roll,” and Paul Whiteman the “King of Jazz”? What is blackface, and why do performers such as Miley Cyrus and Flavor Flav get accused of performing a modern version of minstrelsy? Why do pop stars such as Madonna and Lady Gaga incite incendiary responses from feminists and sexists alike? And why is Darius Rucker the only black country music star?

In this course, you will find answers to these conceptual dilemmas which help listeners intellectually engage with the production and consumption of popular music in the United States. We explore how music is shaped by and shapes American culture. We turn to the music of the billboard charts and the Top 40 to examine how music becomes popular and how its popularity can tell us much about the listening habits of American citizens. Equally important, we study less-popular music on the margins, because it effects and sometimes becomes the music of the center. We consider how race, gender, class, and sexuality are meaningful cultural constructs, communicated in and through musical sound. And we examine how technology and capitalism enabled the development of a modern music industry and also determines how we perceive and interact with sound recordings.

MUSI 2120 History of Jazz Music

Scott DeVeaux
4.0 credits

Lecture: TR / 11:00 am - 12:15 pm / Wilson 402
Class Number: 11168

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Paul Turowski): M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 11169

Section 102 (Paul Turowski): M / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 11170

Section 103 (Paul Turowski): M / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH S008 
Class Number: 11171

Section 104 (Gretchen Michelson): T / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH B012

Class Number: 11172

Section 105 (Gretchen Michelson): T / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH B012

Class Number: 11173

Section 106 (Gretchen Michelson): T / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH B012

Class Number: 11174

Section 107 (Steven Lewis): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11175

Section 108 (Steven Lewis): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11176

Section 109 (Steven Lewis): F / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11177

Section 110 (Amy Coddington): M / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH 107

Class Number: 14528

Section 111 (Amy Coddington): M / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH 107

Class Number: 14529

Section 112 (Amy Coddington): M / 3:00-3:50 pm / OCH 107

Class Number: 14530

Section 113 (Craig Comen): M / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15775

Section 114 (Craig Comen): M / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15776

Section 115 (Craig Comen): M / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15777

Survey of jazz music from before 1900 through the stylistic changes and trends of the twentieth century; important instrumental performers, composers, arrangers, and vocalists.

MUSI 2302 Keyboard Skills (Beginning)

2.0 credits, instructor permission

Lecture / Section 1 (Tracey Stewart): TR / 9:30-10:45 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 12075

Lecture / Section 2 (Tracey Stewart): TR / 11:00-12:15 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 15073

Introductory keyboard skills; includes sight-reading, improvisation, and accompaniment at the keyboard in a variety of styles. No previous knowledge of music required. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors.

MUSI 2302 Keyboard Skills (Beginning)

John Mayhood
2.0 credits, instructor permission

Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:45 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12076

Intermediate keyboard skills for students with some previous musical experience. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors. Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUSI 2306: Fretboard Harmony

Mike Rosensky
2.0 credits, Instructor Permission
Lecture: MWF / 1:00-1:50 / OCH B012
Class Number: 12077

The level of this course will vary, anywhere from beginning to advanced, each semester depending on the guitar experience of students who enroll. Students should contact Mike Rosensky (mlr5q@virginia.edu) during pre-registration letting him know of their interest in the course and of their intent to show up for the first class of the semester when the level and the make-up of the class will be ultimately determined.

In Fretboard Harmony a theory-based approach will be taken to understanding how musical materials (scales, arpeggios, chord voicings) "fit" on the guitar. The majority of class meeting time is spent with guitars in hand "drilling" new material. Practice methods will be explored, with an emphasis on learning how to practice effectively and efficiently.

MUSI 2340 Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1: MW / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 14531

Lecture / Section 2: MW / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 12078

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns. This course will follow my book "Learn To Groove" and can include music students, non music students and is open to students of all skill levels. The course requires that students have or purchase a hand drum of their own. Congas, bongos, djembes, doumbeks or any other hand drums are appropriate.

MUSI 2559 Socioloy of Music

Nicholas Rubin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:45 / CAB 191
Class Number:

Students will consider ways in which individuals and social communities create and engage musical communities. We will analyze musical taste as a point of identification that is neither given nor natural, but contingent and constructed. We will engage foundational critical texts in the sociology of music, and we will examine aspects of continuity and rupture in the current context of digitization and online/mobile social networking. Students need not have specialized skills of musical performance or analysis, though we will develop and utilize a vocabulary for discussing music as sound.

MUSI 2600 Jazz Improvisation

John D'earth
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 13281

The Jazz Improvisation Workshop explores the basic techniques and procedures for improvising in jazz and other musical contexts. No previous jazz or improvising experience is required but students must demonstrate a degree of fluency on their main instrument, an ability to read music and some familiarity with the basics of music theory. An individual interview/audition with the instructor is required before registering for this class.

MUSI 2993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 3020 Studies in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Music

Richard Will
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 9:30-10:45 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 20221

 

MUSI 3050 Music and Discourse Since 1900

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Fred Maus): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 11178

Lecture / Section 2 (Peter D'Elia): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 20222

Studies the range of music that has flourished in the twentieth century, including modernist and post-modern art music, popular music, and world music, through historical, critical, and ethnographic approaches.

MUSI 3090 Performance in Africa

Michelle Kisliuk
4.0 credits
Seminar: T / 3:30-5:10 pm, OCH 107
Class Number: 15075

Lab Section:

Section 101 (Michelle Kisliuk): TR / 5:30-7:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 15378

MUSI 3310 Theory I

Daniel Shanahan
3.0 credits
Lecture: MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 15779

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significant compositions by period composers. (Y)

MUSI 3320 Theory II

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Stephanie Gunst): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11180

Lecture / Section 2 (Kevin Davis): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11179

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significan compositions by period composers.

MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336 Musicianship I, II and III

2.0 credit

These lab courses give practical experience with many aspects of musical perception, performance, and creation. These will include sight-reading and sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and harmony; aural identification of intervals, chords, and rhythmic patterns; and exercises in musical memory and improvisation. Students entering the sequence take a test to determine the appropriate level of their first course. At the end of each course, students take a placement test to determine whether they may enter a higher level course. Courses may be repeated for credit, but each course may be counted toward the major only once.

MUSI 3332 Musicianship I

Lecture (Ryan Maguire): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11181

MUSI 3334 Musicianship II

Lecture (Chris Peck): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11182

MUSI 3336 Musicianship III

Lecture (Adam Carter): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11183

 

MUSI 3400 Ecoacoustics

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 16163

 

MUSI 3993 Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 4510 Cultural and Historical Studies of Music
Topic: Music of Multicultural America

Joel Rubin
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 20224

Music of Multicultural America looks at American traditional and popular musics from a cross-cultural and multi-ethnic perspective. We will examine the traditions most often called “roots music,” including African-American blues and southern old-time string band music, which influenced the development of rock and roll and country and western. We will also study a wide range of other ethnic musical traditions, from Native American pow wows and Cajun to salsa, klezmer and Balkan-Gypsy-punk, which have influenced popular music-making of the past twenty-five years. Along the way we will treat a complex and shifting web of associated ideas, such as authenticity, heritage, nationalism, and multiculturalism, and the musical or music-marketing categories of folk, roots, indie rock, neo-cabaret, and world music. We will ask how “roots” traditions have fed into definitions of “American-ness” over the years, and whether recent trends represent signs of America’s transforming itself into a post-ethnic, post-racial society. This course is designed for music majors, but others may apply with instructor permission. It fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

MUSI 4520 Critical Studies of Music
Topic: The Piano Prelude from Chopin to Dubussy

Daniel Shanahan
3.0 credits
Lecture: MWF / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 20225

This course looks at the piano prelude in the late 19th- and early 20th-century from many different angles. We will study the various compositional techniques employed by composers such as Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, and Debussy, and we will use selected sets of preludes as a way of examining aspects of chromaticism, “impressionism”, music-theoretical discourse, and performance practice. This course will explore the repertoire in depth and provide the students with the tools for engaging with music that frequently eludes discussion.

MUSI 4526 Topics in Ethnomusicology
Topic: Music and Pleasure

Nomi Dave
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-12:15 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15780

Why do humans derive so much pleasure from music? What is the role of culture in shaping our responses to music? How do ideas about musical pleasure vary in different geographical and historical contexts? This seminar will explore anthropological and aesthetic approaches to music, pleasure and the emotions. We will look at music from the US and around the world, ranging from Sufi mysticism and Congolese dance music to Pentecostal praise songs, punk solidarity, and Turkish pop. We will consider issues of public vs. private emotions, morality and taboos, religious ecstasy, love and intimacy, and music as pain, as well as insights from music cognition and psychology in understanding how music affects us.

MUSI 4535 Interactive Media (MICE)

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 5:00-6:15 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 15265

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Kristina Warren): T / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 20227

Section 102 (Kristina Warren): T / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 20228

Section 103 (Kristina Warren): T / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH B011 
Class Number: 20229

 

MUSI 4543 Sound Studio

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: W / 3:30-6:00 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 15782

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Max Tfirn): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 16122

Section 102 (Max Tfirn): R / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 16123

Section 103 (Max Tfirn): R / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH B011 
Class Number: 16124

 

MUSI 4559 Instrumentation

Kate Tamarkin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 20223

This course will introduce students to the acoustical instruments commonly used in orchestral and popular compositions and arrangements. Students will learn the ranges, sonic properties, dynamic range, and idiomatic uses of the instruments as represented in masterpieces of the literature. We will also explore extended techniques used in 20th and 21st century music. Students will become familiar with the notation used by each instrument, and will learn to read clefs, transpose parts, and read full orchestral score. The class will include live demonstration of selected instruments. Students will be expected to execute exercises in basic orchestration, and will complete a final project which will consist of orchestrating a short piano work for full orchestra.

MUSI 4760 Choral Conducting II

Michael Slon
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 20226

 

MUSI 4993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

 

Graduate Courses

MUSI 7350 Interactive Media (RATS)

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits 
Lecture: TR / 5:00-6:15 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 20230

 

MUSI 7509 Cultural and Historical Studies of Music
Topics in Music Cognition

Daniel Shanahan
3.0 credits 
Lecture: T / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 20231

This course will examine some of the primary aspects of research in the psychology of music. Specifically, it will focus on the physiological and psychological responses to sound and music, the perceptual organization of melody, rhythm, and tonality, how perceptual and cognitive factors shape the production of music, the formation of musical taste and preference, as well as music and emotion.  Aspects of experimental design will be discussed, as will the role of empirical methods in music research.

MUSI 7520 Current Studies in Research and Criticism
Topic: Writing about Music

Fred Maus
3.0 credits 
Lecture: W / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15079

We'll consider a range of different kinds of musical experience, and different styles and genres of writing about music, academic and non-academic. Students will read texts about music closely, and will write frequently in homework assignments, in-class exercises, and a final project.

MUSI 7526 Topics in Ethnomusicology
Topic: Music and Authoritarianism

Nomi Dave
3.0 credits
Lecture: R / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15080

Music has long been the soundtrack to political control. From military marches to propaganda songs to mass choir performances, music provides a means to structure time and organize bodies, to heighten collective emotions and convey messages. In this seminar, we will examine the interactions between music and authoritarian ideology and rule from the early twentieth century to the present. Why has music so often been mobilized by authoritarian regimes? What are the aesthetic and political processes at work? How do musicians and listeners figure into this process? In answering these questions we will refer to theories of politics, power and emotion to develop a critical understanding of music’s role in promoting, maintaining, contesting and negotiating authoritarian regimes.

MUSI 7543 Sound Studio

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: M / 3:30-6:00 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 20232

 

MUSI 7581 Composition

3.0 credits

MUSI 8820: Advanced Composition

3.0 credits

MUSI 8840: Advanced Composition

3.0 credits

MUSI 8910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits
Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by first-year graduate students.

MUSI 8920: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

MUSI 8960: Thesis

3.0 credits

MUSI 8993: Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits
Independent study dealing with a specific topic. Requirements will place primary emphasis on independent research.

MUSI 8998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

MUSI 8999: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

MUSI 9010: Directed Readings

3.0 credits

MUSI 9910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits
Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by second year graduate students.

MUSI 9920: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

MUSI 9940: Independent Research

3.0 credits
Research carried out by graduate student in consultation with an instructor.

MUSI 9998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits
Preliminary research directed towards a dissertation in consultation with an instructor.

MUSI 9999: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.

 

Ensembles

MUBD 2601: Basketball Band

Andrew Koch
1.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 6:00-8:00 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 13836

MUEN 2690, 3690 and 4690: African Music and Dance Ensemble

(registration number depends on student seniority in the ensemble)

Michelle Kisliuk
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 5:30-7:15 pm / OCH 107

MUEN 2690
Class Number:
 16513

MUEN 3690
Class Number:
 15181

MUEN 4690
Class Number:
 14539

The African Music and Dance Ensemble is a practical, hands-on course focusing on several music/dance forms from Western and Central Africa with performances during and at the end of the semester. Though no previous experience with music or dance is required, we will give special attention to developing tight ensemble dynamics, aural musicianship, and a polymetric sensibility. Concentration, practice, and faithful attendance are required of each class member, the goal being to develop an ongoing U.Va. African Music and Dance Ensemble.

MUEN 3600: Jazz Ensemble

John D'earth
2.0 credits
Lecture: MR / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11129

Led by internationally recognized jazz trumpeter/composer John D'earth, the Jazz Ensemble is a full-sized jazz big band, whose focus includes “head arrangements” group improvisation, world music and original compositions from within the band, along with music ranging from swing to bop to fusion. You'll gain valuable experience in ensemble playing and in the art of solo improvisation, and may take private instruction in jazz improvisation, perform in small combos and participate in jazz workshops held by such major figures as Michael Brecker, John Abercrombi, Dave Leibman, Bob Moses, Clark Terry, and Joe Henderson.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3610: Orchestra

Kate Tamarkin, Conductor
2.0 credits

Strings

Lecture / Section 100: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11130

Sectionals: M / 5:30-7:00 pm

Section 101: Pete Spaar (Double Bass) / OCH B012
Class Number: 11132

Section 103: Ayn Balija (Viola) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11133

Section 104: Daniel Sender (Violin) / OCH 107
Class Number: 11134

Section 105: David Sariti (Violin) / OCH B018
Class Number: 11135

Section 106: Adam Carter (Cello) / OCH S004
Class Number: 14112

Brass / Woodwinds / Percussion

Lecture / Section 200: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11131

Sectionals: W / 5:15-6:15 pm

Section 201: Stephanie Corwin (Bassoon) / TBA
Class Number: 11136

Section 202: Rob Patterson (Clarinet) / TBA 
Class Number: 11137

Section 203: Kelly Sulick (Flute) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11138

Section 204: Maria Serkin (Horn) / TBA
Class Number: 11139

Section 205: Aaron Hill (Oboe) / TBA
Class Number: 11140

Section 206: I-Jen Fang (Percussion) / B018
Class Number: 11141

Section 207: Matt Ernst (Trumpet) / 107
Class Number: 11142

Section 208: Nathaniel Lee (Trombone) / B012 
Class Number: 11143

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3620: Wind Ensemble

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: M / 6:25-8:45 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building / Room 200
Class Number: 12072

The Wind Ensemble is a 45-member ensemble that features the most outstanding brass, woodwind, and percussion players at the University. The focus of this ensemble is to explore new literature as well as perform the masterworks of the wind band era. The wind ensemble also works with outstanding guest performers and conductors. This group is predominately made up of non-music majors who enjoy the genre of the wind band. Open to all University of Virginia students, auditions are held prior to the start of each semester. For more information on the Wind Ensemble, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/ensembles/windensemble/.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 1: Percussion Chamber Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11144

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Re-established in spring 2005 by I-Jen Fang, principal timpanist and percussionist with CUSO, the Percussion Ensemble is a chamber group that performs literature ranging from classical transcriptions to contemporary music. The ensemble draws upon a large family of pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments, and the number of players and amount of equipment varies greatly from piece to piece. Music reading skills and basic percussion technique on all percussion instruments is required. Previous percussion ensemble experience is highly recommended. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

MUEN 3630, Section 2: Woodwind Ensemble

Stephanie Corwin
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11145

Explore, rehearse and perform woodwind chamber music, including both standard and more obscure works. Focus on developing chamber music playing skills, learning the tendencies of the woodwind instruments, developing musicianship, and enjoying making and sharing music! Instructor permission and audition required.

MUEN 3630, Section 3: Horn Ensemble

Maria Serkin
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11146

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 5: Flute Ensemble

Kelly Sulick
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11147

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 6: Double Reed Ensemble

Aaron Hill
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11148

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 7: Clarinet Ensemble

Rob Paterson
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11149

MUEN 3630, Section 8: Brass Quintet

Matt Ernst
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11150

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630: Jazz Chamber Ensemble

1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition

Lecture / Section 10: Pete Spaar / R / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11151

Lecture / Section 11: Mike Rosensky / T / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11152

Lecture / Section 12: Jeff Decker / F / 2:00-3:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11153

Lecture / Section 13: Pete Spaar / F / 12:30-2:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11154

MUEN 3630, Chamber Music Ensemble

1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition

Lecture: / Section 14: Mimi Tung / TBA
Class Number: 11155

Lecture: / Section 15: Daniel Sender / TBA
Class Number: 11156

Lecture: / Section 16: David Sariti / R / 5:00-6:30 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11157

Lecture: / Section 17: Ayn Balija / TBA
Class Number: 11158

Lecture: / Section 18: Adam Carter / TBA
Class Number: 11159

MUEN 3630, Section 19: Trombone Ensemble

Nathaniel Lee
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 14540

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition. Contact Nathaniel Lee to schedule an audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 21: Blue Grass

Richard Will
1.0 credit, Instructor permission
Lecture: T / 7:00-8:00 pm / Eunoia
Class Number: 20233

MUEN 3640: Klezmer Ensemble

Joel Rubin
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH 113 
Class Number: TBA

Klezmer, originally the ritual and celebratory music of the Yiddish-speaking Jews of Eastern Europe, was brought to North America by immigrants around the turn of the last century. Since the 1970s, a dynamic revival of this tradition has been taking place in America and beyond. Klezmer’s recent popularity has brought it far from its roots in medieval minstrelsy and Jewish ritual and into the sphere of mainstream culture. The traditional klezmer style presents the experienced instrumentalist with a range of technical challenges with its characteristic note bends, rubati, Baroque-style embellishments and other micro-improvisational techniques, opening up a world of expressive possibilities not available to them from either classical music or jazz. This music was passed on orally from generation to generation, and many of the ornaments which are so integral to the klezmer sound can only be approximated by Western staff notation – not to mention the patterns of improvised variation which are the cornerstone of the style. There will therefore be an emphasis on learning by ear as much as possible, but we will be using music in the form of lead sheets and other written instructional materials to supplement sound examples.

The class focuses on the study and performance of various traditions, including the klezmer traditions of New York between the two world wars, 19th century Eastern Europe, as well as original contemporary compositions. Emphasis will be on learning by ear, improvisation within a modal context, and learning to develop a cohesive ensemble sound. Concentration, practice, and good attendance are required of each ensemble member.

Admission is by audition during first class period of semester or prior to that, by appointment with the instructor.

MUEN 3650: University Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11161

The University Singers is the University's premier SATB ensemble, performing a cappella and accompanied choral literature ranging from chant to the works of contemporary composers. Past repertoire has included Bach's Mass in B minor, Orff's Carmina Burana, the Duruflé Requiem, and Bernstein's Chichester Psalms, as well as shorter a cappella works. Recent trips have taken the group to Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Cincinnati, New Orleans, New York City, Philadelphia, and the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., as well as the campuses of other American universities for collaborative concerts. The group has also been heard on European tours in England, Italy, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland. Recent highlights have included performances with the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia, a concert and workshop with Bobby McFerrin, and a concert tour of the Southeastern U.S.

Students in the University Singers come from all six of UVA's undergraduate schools, including Arts and Sciences, Education, and Engineering, as well as several of the University's graduate and professional schools. Together, they enjoy an esprit de corps that arises from the pursuit of musical excellence and the camaraderie the singers develop offstage.

All singers at the University - undergraduates, graduate students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to audition. University Singers is offered for two hours academic credit. Michael Slon, who has conducted choruses at the Oberlin Conservatory and Indiana University School of Music, is the conductor. For more information on the University Singers, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/usingers/

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3651: Chamber Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: F / 1:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11160

Chamber Singers is a select ensemble drawn from the University Singers. The ensemble meets once a week and focuses on music for chamber choir ranging from the Renaissance to contemporary pieces. Recent performances have included the Monteverdi Mass for 4 voices (1651), Britten'sHymn to St. Cecilia, and Bach's Cantata 150, as well as contemporary works by Meredith Monk and Eric Whitacre, and arrangements of classic jazz standards by Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, and the King's Singers. Interested singers will be considered for the chamber ensemble as part of their University Singers audition. For more information, please visit our webpage.

Restricted to: Instructor permission

MUEN 3670: Early Music Ensemble: Baroque Orchestra

David Sariti
2.0 credit
Lecture: R / 7:00-9:00 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12073

The Baroque Orchestra, directed by David Sariti, offers students the rare opportunity to perform music of the 17th and 18th centuries on the instruments for which it was written, at low pitch. Students use period instruments from the University's extensive collection, receiving personal instruction on the special techniques necessary, and must be accomplished on their modern counterparts.

MUEN 3680: New Music Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11162

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Performance of vocal and instrumental music of the twentieth century.

A one-credit course at the University of Virginia, the New Music Ensemble explores and performs exciting music of our time. The ensemble consists of dedicated instrumentalists, singers and UVa performance faculty. We perform a wide variety of contemporary music suitable to our instrumentation, including new works created by UVa composers.

The New Music Ensemble seeks dedicated instrumentalists and singers to explore and perform a wide variety of contemporary music. To audition, come to the first class with your instrument. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

Open to UVA students, community musicians and advanced high school students.

 

Summer 2014

Undergraduate Academic Courses

Session I: May 19 - June 14

MUSI 2390/3390: Introduction to Music and Computers

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-3:15 / Gibson 041
Class Number: 10999

Introduction to the use of computers in music composition, with hands-on experience. Appropriate for non-majors.

Session II: June 16 - July 12

MUSI 2110/4519: Music in Everyday Life

Michelle Kisliuk
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 10:30am-12:45pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 12404

Explores the implicit cultural messages which circulate within our ever-changing daily soundtracks. This courses focuses our attention on music that we usually take for granted, getting us thinking about the depths of quotidian aesthetic experience.

MUSI 2120/3120: History of Jazz/Jazz Studies
Topic: Hearing as Jazz Musicians Hear

John D'earth
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-3:15 / OCH 107
Class Number: 12297

Topic: Hearing as Jazz Musicians Hear
An in-depth look at the way jazz musicians listen to music. What do they listen for? How do they use great jazz recordings to grow as musicians and improvising artists? What skills are required to develop timing, phrasing, and musical creativity? The course will examine the recorded work of major jazz artists, explore the “inner hearing” of musicians with participatory exercises in rhythm, melody and movement, and demonstrate the processes by which jazz musicians master theory, musical structure, and their instruments. No previous jazz or musical experience necessary.

Session III: July 14 - August 3

MUSI 1310: Basic Musical Skills

Peter D'Elia
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 10:30-12:45 / OCH 107
Class Number: 12294

Not open to students already qualified to elect MUSI 2302 or 3310. Study of the rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music. Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of music required.

MUSI 2340: Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-2:30 / OCH B018
Class Number: 10996

Study of rhythmic patterns associated with rhythms from West African, the Caribbean, Brazil, and the United States, through theory and performance.

MUSI 2559/4543: Music for Video Games

Paul Turowski
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-3:15 / Gibson 041
MUSI 2559 Class Number: 12549

This course will examine the issues peculiar to music used in the service of primarily visual media. In addition to exploring historical issues, students will learn about the technical and aesthetic challenges of composing for films and video games.

Address

McIntire Department of Music
112 Old Cabell Hall
P.O. Box 400176 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4176

Email: music@virginia.edu