2014-2015 Courses

Fall 2014

MUSI 1040 Exploring the Orchestra

Kate Tamarkin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 15617

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Tracey Stewart): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15618

Section 102 (Tracey Stewart): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15619

Section 103 (Tracey Stewart): F / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15620

An introduction to the tradition and repertory of the symphony orchestra. Topics include the development and instrumental makeup of the modern symphony orchestra, forms and genres, and the role of the conductor.

MUSI 1310 Basic Musical Skills

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Jeff Decker): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 107

Class Number: 11114

Lecture / Section 2 (Jarek Ervin): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 107

Class Number: 11115

Lecture / Section 3 (Craig Comen): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107

Class Number: 11116

Study of the rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music.  Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of music required.

MUSI 1993 Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 2070 Popular Music

Karl Miller
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-11:50 am / Maury 104
Class Number: 19607

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Amy Coddington): W / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 19608

Section 102 (Amy Coddington): W / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 19609

Section 103 (Amy Coddington): W / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 19610

 

MUSI 2302 Keyboard Skills (Beginning)

2.0 credits, instructor permission

Lecture / Section 1 (John Mayhood): TR / 11:00 am - 12:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11118

Lecture / Section 2 (John Mayhood): TR / 12:30-1:45 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 15445

Introductory keyboard skills; includes sight-reading, improvisation, and accompaniment at the keyboard in a variety of styles. No previous knowledge of music required. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors.

MUSI 2308 Voice Skills

Pam Beasley
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 4:00-4:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 16662

An introductory course to basic vocal technique; discussion to include those elements essential for healthy singing in a variety of styles. Will involve group and solo singing to apply these elements. No previous voice training or musical background required.

MUSI 2340 Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1: MW / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 11943

Lecture / Section 2: MW / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 14218

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns. This course will follow my book "Learn To Groove" and can include music students, non music students and is open to students of all skill levels. The course requires that students have or purchase a hand drum of their own. Congas, bongos, djembes, doumbeks or any other hand drums are appropriate.

MUSI 2350 Technosonics: Digital Music and Sound Art Composition

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 12:00-12:50 / Maury Hall 209
Class Number: 15190

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Victor Szabo): T / 2:00-2:50 pm / CAB 268
Class Number: 15191

Section 102 (Victor Szabo): T / 3:00-3:50 pm / CAB 268
Class Number: 15192

Section 103 (Rachel Trapp): M / 11:00-11:50 am / CAB 268
Class Number: 15193

Section 104 (Victor Szabo): T / 4:00-4:50 pm / CAB 268
Class Number: 15194

Section 105 (Rachel Trapp): T / 11:00-11:50 am / CAB 268
Class Number: 15195

Section 106 (Rachel Trapp): T / 12:30-1:20 pm / CAB 268
Class Number: 15196

Section 107 (Max Tfirn): R / 2:00-2:50 pm / CAB 268
Class Number: 15197

Section 108 (Max Tfirn): R / 3:00-3:50 pm / CAB 268
Class Number: 15198

Section 109 (Eli Stine): W / 11:00-11:50 am / CAB 268
Class Number: 15199

Section 110 (Max Tfirn): R / 4:00-4:50 pm / CAB 268
Class Number: 15621

Section 111 (Eli Stine): R / 11:00-11:50 am / CAB 268
Class Number: 15622

Section 112 (Eli Stine): R / 12:30-1:20 pm / CAB 268
Class Number: 15623

This class (www.technosonics.net) explores the history, theory and practice of digital music and sound art. Students learn tools and techniques of music technology that inform many genres and traditions. In addition to historical and theoretical concerns, students will experiment with digital tools for musical creation.

MUSI 2370 Making Rock

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-4:20 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19970

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Ryan Maguire): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 19971

Section 102 (Ryan Maguire): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 19972

Section 103 (Ryan Maguire): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 19973

An introduction to rock from the 1950's to the present, comprising musical, cultural and technological histories and compositional projects, informed by the points of view and poetic processes of their makers. The course is organized around musical and poetic foundations such as the backbeat, affect, control vs. abandon, distortion, production, the solo, and lyric innovation. Creative assignments involve producing musical expressions of rock.

MUSI 2600 Jazz Improvisation

John D'earth
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 13955

The Jazz Improvisation Workshop explores the basic techniques and procedures for improvising in jazz and other musical contexts. No previous jazz or improvising experience is required but students must demonstrate a degree of fluency on their main instrument, an ability to read music and some familiarity with the basics of music theory. An individual interview/audition with the instructor is required before registering for this class.

MUSI 2700 Music and Politics

Nomi Dave
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:20 / Maury 104
Class Number: 21161

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Lydia Warren): W / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 21162

Section 102 (Lydia Warren): W / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 21163

Section 103 (Lydia Warren): W / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 21164

Why do elections need election songs, militaries need marches, and activists need anthems? In this introductory course, we will explore the relationship of music and politics, from state-sponsored propaganda to explicit critique. Our aim is to understand the various ways in which music can be political, and politics can be shaped by music. We will consider examples from the US and around the world, including protest songs to and from South Africa, the marketing of Korean girl bands, and musical exchanges between West Africa and the United States. We will also discuss a number of key musical concepts across the course of the semester. No prior musical experience is necessary.

MUSI 2993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 3040 Studies in Twentieth-Century Music

Joel Rubin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19611

MUSI 3050 Music and Discourse Since 1900

Fred Maus
3.0 credits
Lecture: MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 15626

Studies the range of music that has flourished in the twentieth century, including modernist and post-modern art music, popular music, and world music, through historical, critical, and ethnographic approaches.

MUSI 3070 Introduction to Musical Ethnography

Nomita Dave
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00 am -12:15 pm, OCH B012
Class Number: 15625

This course explores ways of examining and representing music and sound as a fundamentally social practice. Such an approach looks beyond the notes to study music as part of human social life and experience. Readings and listenings will focus on a number of genres and traditions from throughout the world, including singers in Nepali nightclubs, dance bands from Central Africa, Islamic pop songs, Moroccan trance, and country music from Texas. We will consider in depth the theories and methods involved in conducting research and writing about music as a social phenomenon, considering the roles and perspectives of musicians, listeners, markets and the media. We will also examine the role of the researcher, considering the ethical issues involved in representing music and culture from elsewhere.Students will have the opportunity to apply the methods we discuss in class in short assignments involving music-making in and around Charlottesville.

MUSI 3310 Theory I

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Steven Lewis): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11120

Lecture / Section 2 (Stephanie Gunst): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11121

Lecture / Section 3 (Scott DeVeaux): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11122

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significant compositions by period composers. (Y)

MUSI 3332 and 3334 Musicianship I and II

2.0 credit

These lab courses give practical experience with many aspects of musical perception, performance, and creation. These will include sight-reading and sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and harmony; aural identification of intervals, chords, and rhythmic patterns; and exercises in musical memory and improvisation. Students entering the sequence take a test to determine the appropriate level of their first course. At the end of each course, students take a placement test to determine whether they may enter a higher level course. Courses may be repeated for credit, but each course may be counted toward the major only once.

MUSI 3332 Musicianship I

Lecture / Section 1 (Adam Carter): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11124

Lecture / Section 2 (Aldona Dye): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / S008
Class Number: 11123

Lecture / Section 3 (Justin Mueller): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19613

MUSI 3334 Musicianship II

Lecture (Kyle Chattleton): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11125

MUSI 3370 Songwriting

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 15627

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Jon Bellona): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 15910

Section 102 (Jon Bellona): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 15911

Section 103 (Jon Bellona): F / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 15912

The goal of this course is to delve into songwriting; to develop your aural, analytic and creative abilities and to join them together in understanding and composing songs. You will learn about rhythm, melodic design, harmonic progression, lyrics and song forms. You will also work on eartraining, so that concepts you learn will be sonically meaningful. We will consider examples from a broad musical spectrum: blues, folk, tin pan alley, musicals, R & B, rock & roll, hip hop. We will also discuss the issues that songwriters encounter. You will have the opportunity to suggest songs for study, and some assignments will be done in groups. In these situations, we will organize groups that have complementary abilities for in-class performances. The Lab is a required part of the class, and you must sign up for a lab section. During the lab you will go over concepts we are covering in class, as well as work on additional eartraining, analysis and creative projects.

Prerequisites: MUSI 3310

Instructor Permission Required

MUSI 3390 Introduction to Music and Computers

Erik Deluca
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11127

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Kristina Warren): F / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 11129

Section 102 (Kristina Warren): F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 11128

Section 103 (Kristina Warren): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 11130

Introduction to Music and Computers in an upper-level introductory course in music technology. Students gain theoretical, historical and practical knowledge of electronic and computer music. An emphasis is placed on creative hands-on experience composing computer music.

Theoretical and practical topics include acoustics, recording, editing and mixing, MIDI, sound synthesis, and audio DSP. Programs used will include Audacity, Spear, SoundHack, Pro Tools, Logic, and MaxMSP. Note that you MUST register for the Lab (0 credits) as well as the course.

3390 fulfills the composition requirement of the Music Major. This is a composition class and most assignments are creative in nature.

MUSI 3993 Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 4331 Theory III

Michael Puri
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 9:30-10:45 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11132

Studies in 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century techniques and styles through analysis and composition. Prerequisite: MUSI 3320 or instructor permission.

MUSI 4509 Cultural and Historical Studies of Music
Topic: Music and Consciousness

Fred Maus
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 19614

Explorations of musical experience, drawing on resources including pragmatist aesthetics, meditation, music therapy, object relations theory, and the experimental music tradition of composers such as John Cage and Pauline Oliveros. Class meetings will include experiential learning as well as discussion of readings and topics.

MUSI 4519 Critical Studies of Music
Topic: Music, Gender, Sound, Body

Bonnie Gordon
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 15200

Can you hear gender?  How does sound influence cultural understandings of Gender? What happens when boys' voices change?  Why do so many operas end with women singing themselves to death?  Why could nuns sing in the seventeenth century while women could not participate in public performances? This interdisciplinary seminar explores these issues and more.   Through readings, class presentations, discussions, blog posts, and analytical papers, you will develop your own understanding of key methodologies and terms used by music scholars and critics, gender theorists, and activists. You will apply what you have learned to musical traditions and soundscapes that particularly interest you. Class discussions will push all of us to challenge our assumptions about music, sound, gender, sex, and sexuality.

MUSI 4533 Advanced Musicianship

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19619

 

MUSI 4535 Interactive Media (MICE)

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 5:00-6:15 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 19979

 

Spring 2015

Undergraduate Courses

MUSI 1010 Introduction to Music

Liza Flood
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-11:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 15109

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Kristina Warren): F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15110

Section 102 (Kristina Warren): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15111

Section 103 (Kristina Warren): F / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15112

Surveys the musical literatures that make up the common listening experience of contemporary Americans, emphasizing such “classical” repertories as symphony, opera, “early music”, “new music,” blues, and jazz. Teaches effective ways of listening to and thinking critically about each repertoire. Considers how musical choices reflect or create cultural identities, including attitudes toward gender, ethnicity, social relationships, and ideas of the sacred.

MUSI 1310 Basic Musical Skills

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Jeff Decker): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11392

Lecture / Section 2 (Jarek Ervin): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11393

Lecture / Section 3 (Craig Comen): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11391

Study of the rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music.  Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of music required.

MUSI 1993 Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 2070 Popular Music

Karl Hagstrom Miller
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 12:00-12:50 pm / TBA
Class Number: 15856

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Steven Lewis): W / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15857

Section 102 (Steven Lewis): W / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15858

Section 103 (Steven Lewis): W / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15859

Section 104 (Lydia Warren): T / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15860

Section 105 (Lydia Warren): T / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15861

Section 106 (Lydia Warren): T / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15862

Section 107 (Nick Rubin): M / 9:00-9:50 am / Clark G054
Class Number: 21039

Section 108 (Nick Rubin): M / 10:00-10:50 am / Clark G054
Class Number: 21041

Section 109 (Nick Rubin): M / 11:00-11:50 am / Clark G054
Class Number: 21042

Section 110 (Stephanie Gunst): R / 9:30-10:45 am / OCH B012
Class Number: TBA

Section 111 (Stephanie Gunst): R / 12:30-1:45 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: TBA

Section 112 (Stephanie Gunst): R / 2:00-3:15 am / OCH B012
Class Number: TBA

 

MUSI 2120 History of Jazz Music

Scott DeVeaux
4.0 credits

Lecture: TR / 11:00 am - 12:15 pm / Maury 209
Class Number: 11394

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Kyle Chattleton): M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 11395

Section 102 (Kyle Chattleton): M / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 11396

Section 103 (Kyle Chattleton): M / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH S008 
Class Number: 11397

Section 104 (Tracey Stewart): T / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11398

Section 105 (Tracey Stewart): T / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11399

Section 106 (Tracey Stewart): W / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 11400

Section 107 (Justin Mueller): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11401

Section 108 (Justin Mueller): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11402

Section 109 (Justin Mueller): F / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11403

Section 110 (Aldona Dye): M / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 14282

Section 111 (Aldona Dye): M / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 14283

Section 112 (Aldona Dye): M / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 14284

Survey of jazz music from before 1900 through the stylistic changes and trends of the twentieth century; important instrumental performers, composers, arrangers, and vocalists.

MUSI 2302 Keyboard Skills (Beginning)

2.0 credits, instructor permission

Lecture / Section 1 (Gretchen Carlson): TR / 11:00 am - 12:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12225

Lecture / Section 2 (Gretchen Carlson): TR / 12:30-1:45 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 14726

Introductory keyboard skills; includes sight-reading, improvisation, and accompaniment at the keyboard in a variety of styles. No previous knowledge of music required. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors.

MUSI 2304 Keyboard Skills (Intermediate)

John Mayhood
2.0 credits, instructor permission

Lecture: TR / 9:30-10:45 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 12226

Intermediate keyboard skills for students with some previous musical experience. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors. Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUSI 2306: Fretboard Harmony

Mike Rosensky
2.0 credits, Instructor Permission
Lecture: MWF / 1:00-1:50 / OCH B012
Class Number: 12227

The level of this course will vary, anywhere from beginning to advanced, each semester depending on the guitar experience of students who enroll. Students should contact Mike Rosensky (mlr5q@virginia.edu) during pre-registration letting him know of their interest in the course and of their intent to show up for the first class of the semester when the level and the make-up of the class will be ultimately determined.

In Fretboard Harmony a theory-based approach will be taken to understanding how musical materials (scales, arpeggios, chord voicings) "fit" on the guitar. The majority of class meeting time is spent with guitars in hand "drilling" new material. Practice methods will be explored, with an emphasis on learning how to practice effectively and efficiently.

MUSI 2340 Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits

LectureMW / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 14285

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns. This course will follow my book "Learn To Groove" and can include music students, non music students and is open to students of all skill levels. The course requires that students have or purchase a hand drum of their own. Congas, bongos, djembes, doumbeks or any other hand drums are appropriate.

MUSI 2342 Learn to Groove Intermediate

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits

LectureMW / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 19689

 

MUSI 2600 Jazz Improvisation

John D'earth
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 13149

The Jazz Improvisation Workshop explores the basic techniques and procedures for improvising in jazz and other musical contexts. No previous jazz or improvising experience is required but students must demonstrate a degree of fluency on their main instrument, an ability to read music and some familiarity with the basics of music theory. An individual interview/audition with the instructor is required before registering for this class.

MUSI 2993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 3010 Early Modern Music (1500-1700)

Bonnie Gordon
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00am - 12:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19706

 

MUSI 3050 Music and Discourse Since 1900

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Karl Hagstrom Miller): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11404

Lecture / Section 2 (Fred Maus): MWF / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 15864

Studies the range of music that has flourished in the twentieth century, including modernist and post-modern art music, popular music, and world music, through historical, critical, and ethnographic approaches.

MUSI 3090 Performance in Africa

Michelle Kisliuk
4.0 credits
Seminar: T / 3:30-5:10 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 14728

Lab Section:

Section 101 (Michelle Kisliuk): TR / 5:30-7:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 14925

MUSI 3310 Theory I

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Michael Puri): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 15116

Lecture / Section 2 (Jon Bellona): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 19708

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significant compositions by period composers. (Y)

MUSI 3320 Theory II

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Amy Coddington): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11406

Lecture / Section 2 (Fred Maus): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 11405

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significan compositions by period composers.

MUSI 3332 and 3334 Musicianship I and II

2.0 credit

These lab courses give practical experience with many aspects of musical perception, performance, and creation. These will include sight-reading and sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and harmony; aural identification of intervals, chords, and rhythmic patterns; and exercises in musical memory and improvisation. Students entering the sequence take a test to determine the appropriate level of their first course. At the end of each course, students take a placement test to determine whether they may enter a higher level course. Courses may be repeated for credit, but each course may be counted toward the major only once.

MUSI 3332 Musicianship I

Lecture (Adam Carter): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11407

MUSI 3334 Musicianship II

Lecture (Ryan Maguire): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11408

MUSI 3380 Introduction to Composition

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits

Lecture: MW / 1:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19720

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Rachel Trapp): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 19724

Section 102 (Rachel Trapp): R / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 19726

Section 103 (Rachel Trapp): R / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH S008 
Class Number: 19730

 

Prerequisite: Instructor Permission

MUSI 3400 EcoAcoustics

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 15328

 

MUSI 3993 Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 4507 Composers
Topic: Debussy and Ravel

Michael Puri
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19734

This course surveys the music and culture of Third Republic France (1870-1940). We will pay particular attention to the life and work of Debussy and Ravel, not only because of the sheer quality and historical influence of their music, but also because of its deep entanglement with the important trends of this period: Wagnerism, exoticism, symbolism, decadence, neoclassicism, the "guerre des chapelles" between rival musical factions, and jazz, among others.

Prerequisite: MUSI 3320 (Theory 2) or instructor permission.

MUSI 4520 Critical Studies in Music
Topic: Opera on Stage

Richard Will
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 15866

What happens to operas when they go on stage?  How do singers, conductors, designers and directors create their interpretations?  How do performances treat the history of the opera, or its story?  How do they relate to our contemporary world?  We will study several operas in depth, including works by Monteverdi, Handel, Mozart, Offenbach, Wagner, Verdi, Mascagni, and Bartok.  We will look at their performance history over the last several decades and visit Met HD and other performances of the present.  Students will also have an opportunity to explore their own interpretations.

MUSI 4526 Topics in Ethnomusicology
Topic: Global DJ Culture

Noel Lobley, noel.lobley@prm.ox.ac.uk
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 9:30-10:45 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 15117

Global DJ culture today connects, remixes and circulates a dizzying diversity of musical styles, histories and sounds. In this course we will explore the social, historical and artistic role of the modern DJ through a wide range of cross-cultural case studies. Considering the creative compositions of multiple turntablists within the wider contexts of hip hop, dub and electronic sampling and remix culture, we will explore vibrant new music forms generated by DJ art including dubstep, Chicago footwork and Shangaan Electro. Through multiple musical examples we will analyse the artistic, ethical and social significance at play when DJs sample, quote, and feedback across musical cultures.

MUSI 4540 Computer Sound Generation

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 19736

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Eli Stine): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 19778

Section 102 (Eli Stine): R / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 19779

Section 103 (Eli Stine): R / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH B011 
Class Number: 19780

MUSI 4540 is focused on composition using digital means, and on understanding their perceptual and technical underpinnings. We will create music using digital synthesis and sound processing with programs using both GUI’s and command-line programming. You will also learn about multichannel audio and spatialization as well as signification. The goal is to develop both your understanding of compositional design, through exploration of music using these technologies, and to enhance your ability to realize your compositional goals. There is a weekly lab required for this course and you will need to register for this as well.

Prerequisite: Instructor Permission

MUSI 4545 Computer Applications in Music

Luke Dahl
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 19782

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Max Tfirn): T / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 19783

Section 102 (Max Tfirn): T / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 19784

Section 103 (Max Tfirn): T / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH B011 
Class Number: 19785

This course focuses on understanding and implementing audio effects and using them for musical projects. We will cover the signal processing involved in audio effects such as delay, reverb, chorus, flanger, distortion and compression, and we will implement these effects as Audio Unit plugins by programming in C/C++. We will emphasize the musical application of our designs, and as a final project students will have the opportunity to create a unique new effect that addresses their own musical goals. Previous programming experience is helpful but not required, as we will cover the necessary fundamentals. For questions contact the professor at lukedahl@ccrma.stanford.edu.

MUSI 4559 Choral Arranging

Michael Slon
3.0 credits
Lecture: MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 20546

Choral Arranging 4559 will explore the art of writing for chorus and small vocal ensemble, and will aim at developing practical skills in creating and transcribing arrangements. Students will study a variety of examples from the choral literature, and the class will serve as workshop chorus, such that student arrangements can be performed and studied in the classroom setting.

MUSI 4720 Instrumental Conducting II

Kate Tamarkin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 19786

 

MUSI 4993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

 

MUSI 4710 Instrumental Conducting I

Kate Tamarkin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 19623

MUSI 4993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

Graduate Clases

MUSI 7512 Studies in Jazz Literature

Scott DeVeaux
3.0 credits 
Lecture: T / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19791

 

MUSI 7520 Current Studies in Research and Criticism
Topic: Inventing Folk Music--Or Not

Richard Will
3.0 credits 
Lecture: R / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 14731

Name a folk music--"X Music"--and you can probably find a book or a website called "The Invention of X Music." It will present the tradition, not as the spontaneous expression of a place or community, as most people think of folk music, but as the self-conscious creation of someone with a political, social, or aesthetic agenda. This perspective has helped dispel a lot of romanticized notions about music’s relationship to class, race, region, nation, and more. It has also overlooked ways in which communities may embrace folk music as a potent expression of identity, even when they recognize that it is invented. This seminar will consider the scholarship on invention in light of alternatives that are emerging from ethnography, historical studies, and elsewhere. We will look at a broad range of examples, beginning in the 18thcentury and running to the present, and covering Scottish, Irish, German, Anglo-American, and African-American music among others--everything from jigs and reels to blues and bluegrass. Musical experience is not necessary, and students from all humanities disciplines are welcome.

MUSI 7526 Topics in Ethnomusicology
Topic: Global Sound Cultures

Noel Lobley, noel.lobley@prm.ox.ac.uk
3.0 credits 
Lecture: W / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 14732

This course explores diverse accounts of the role of sound and listening in global cultures, focusing on the contemporary and historical production, collection and circulation of sound and sound-producing objects. Sound objects have been amassed for centuries – collected, documented and stored in archives, lofts, memory sticks, phones and clouds – while modern technology now creates exciting new sonic possibilities for the delivery and curation of sound. Phonographers use microphones to capture the rhythms of insects, electronic artist Aphex Twin can conduct an orchestra by remote control, and sound artists use ambisonics to encode sound fields with incredible fidelity. As today the influence of the commercial recording industry is declining, and the age of personal sound production and inter-personal distribution is proliferating many key questions arise: What methods and resources might scholars use to collect, analyse, create and use sound? How might we conceptualise and develop the relationships between sound archives, soundscapes and contemporary communities? What does it mean to listen to and in culture? How do different cultures experience, shape and change the world around them through sound and listening?

MUSI 7540 Computer Sound Generation and Spatial Processing

Luke Dahl, lukedahl@ccrma.stanford.edu
3.0 credits
Lecture: M / 5:00-7:30 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 21050

Intro to Audio DSP for Musicians: This course will cover basic theoretical and practical aspects of processing audio in computers (i.e. audio digital signal processing), including filters and Fourier transforms. The goals are to understand the properties and limitations of digital sound and to become familiar with engineering and mathematical terminology and techniques, so that students are able to more easily understand how common audio processing techniques work, and so that they can understand and implement new techniques described in the technical literature. Programming exercises in Matlab will build practical fluency, and musical applications will be emphasized.

Portions of class content may be based on students' interests.

Previous experience with sound in computers is expected, but previous engineering experience is not required.

MUSI 7547 Materials of Contemporary Music

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 5:00-6:15 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 19792

Ensembles

MUBD 2601Basketball Band

Andrew Koch
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 6:00-8:20 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 13674

 

MUEN 2600 Concert Band

Andrew Koch
2.0 credits
Lecture: W / 6:25-8:245pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 11354

 

MUEN 2690, 3690 and 4690 African Music and Dance Ensemble

Michelle Kisliuk
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 5:30-7:15 pm / OCH 107

(registration number depends on student seniority in the ensemble)

MUEN 2690
Class Number: 15547

MUEN 3690
Class Number: 14784

MUEN 4690
Class Number: 14293

The African Music and Dance Ensemble is a practical, hands-on course focusing on several music/dance forms from Western and Central Africa with performances during and at the end of the semester. Though no previous experience with music or dance is required, we will give special attention to developing tight ensemble dynamics, aural musicianship, and a polymetric sensibility. Concentration, practice, and faithful attendance are required of each class member, the goal being to develop an ongoing U.Va. African Music and Dance Ensemble.

MUEN 3600 Jazz Ensemble

John D'earth
2.0 credits
Lecture: MR / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11355

Led by internationally recognized jazz trumpeter/composer John D'earth, the Jazz Ensemble is a full-sized jazz big band, whose focus includes “head arrangements” group improvisation, world music and original compositions from within the band, along with music ranging from swing to bop to fusion. You'll gain valuable experience in ensemble playing and in the art of solo improvisation, and may take private instruction in jazz improvisation, perform in small combos and participate in jazz workshops held by such major figures as Michael Brecker, John Abercrombi, Dave Leibman, Bob Moses, Clark Terry, and Joe Henderson.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3610: Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia

Kate Tamarkin, Conductor
2.0 credits

Strings

Lecture / Section 100: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11356

Sectionals: M / 5:30-7:00 pm

Section 101: Pete Spaar (Double Bass) / OCH B012
Class Number: 11358

Section 103: Ayn Balija (Viola) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11359

Section 104: Daniel Sender (Violin) / OCH 107
Class Number: 11360

Section 105: David Sariti (Violin) / OCH B018
Class Number: 11361

Section 106: Adam Carter (Cello) / OCH S004
Class Number: 13926

Brass / Woodwinds / Percussion

Lecture / Section 200: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11357

Sectionals: W / 5:15-6:15 pm

Section 201: Elizabeth Roberts (Bassoon) / TBA
Class Number: 11362

Section 202: Rob Patterson (Clarinet) / TBA 
Class Number: 11363

Section 203: Kelly Sulick (Flute) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11364

Section 204: Maria Serkin (Horn) / TBA
Class Number: 11365

Section 205: Aaron Hill (Oboe) / TBA
Class Number: 11366

Section 206: I-Jen Fang (Percussion) / B018
Class Number: 11367

Section 207: Chris Buchanan (Trumpet) / 107
Class Number: 11368

Section 208: Nate Lee (Trombone) / B012 
Class Number: 11369

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3620 Wind Ensemble

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: M / 6:25-8:45 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building / Room 200
Class Number: 12223

The Wind Ensemble is a 45-member ensemble that features the most outstanding brass, woodwind, and percussion players at the University. The focus of this ensemble is to explore new literature as well as perform the masterworks of the wind band era. The wind ensemble also works with outstanding guest performers and conductors. This group is predominately made up of non-music majors who enjoy the genre of the wind band. Open to all University of Virginia students, auditions are held prior to the start of each semester. For more information on the Wind Ensemble, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/ensembles/windensemble/.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 1: Percussion Chamber Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11370

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Re-established in spring 2005 by I-Jen Fang, principal timpanist and percussionist with CUSO, the Percussion Ensemble is a chamber group that performs literature ranging from classical transcriptions to contemporary music. The ensemble draws upon a large family of pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments, and the number of players and amount of equipment varies greatly from piece to piece. Music reading skills and basic percussion technique on all percussion instruments is required. Previous percussion ensemble experience is highly recommended. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

MUEN 3630, Section 2: Woodwind Ensemble

Elizabeth Roberts
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11371

Explore, rehearse and perform woodwind chamber music, including both standard and more obscure works. Focus on developing chamber music playing skills, learning the tendencies of the woodwind instruments, developing musicianship, and enjoying making and sharing music! Instructor permission and audition required.

MUEN 3630, Section 3: Horn Ensemble

Maria Serkin
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11372

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

 

MUEN 3630, Section 5: Flute Ensemble

Kelly Sulick
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11373

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

 

MUEN 3630, Section 6: Double Reed Ensemble

Aaron Hill
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11374

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

 

MUEN 3630, Section 7: Wind Quintet

Rob Patterson
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11375

Instructor permission by audition.

 

MUEN 3630, Section 8: Brass Quintet

Chris Buchanan
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11376

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

 

MUEN 3630: Jazz Dhamber Ensemble

1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition

Lecture / Section 10: Pete Spaar / R / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11377

Lecture / Section 11: Mike Rosensky / T / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11378

Lecture / Section 12: Jeff Decker / F / 2:00-3:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11379

Lecture / Section 22: Pete Spaar / F / 12:30-2:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11380

 

MUEN 3630, Chamber Music Ensemble

1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition

Lecture: / Section 14: Mimi Tung / TBA
Class Number: 11381

Lecture: / Section 15: Daniel Sender / TBA
Class Number: 11382

Lecture: / Section 16: David Sariti / R / 5:00-6:30 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11383

Lecture: / Section 17: Ayn Balija / TBA
Class Number: 11384

Lecture: / Section 18: Adam Carter / TBA
Class Number: 11385

 

MUEN 3630, Section 19: Trombone Ensemble

Nate Lee
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 14294

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition. Contact Nathaniel Lee to schedule an audition.

 

MUEN 3640: Klezmer Ensemble

Joel Rubin
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 16127

Klezmer, originally the ritual and celebratory music of the Yiddish-speaking Jews of Eastern Europe, was brought to North America by immigrants around the turn of the last century. Since the 1970s, a dynamic revival of this tradition has been taking place in America and beyond. Klezmer’s recent popularity has brought it far from its roots in medieval minstrelsy and Jewish ritual and into the sphere of mainstream culture. The traditional klezmer style presents the experienced instrumentalist with a range of technical challenges with its characteristic note bends, rubati, Baroque-style embellishments and other micro-improvisational techniques, opening up a world of expressive possibilities not available to them from either classical music or jazz. This music was passed on orally from generation to generation, and many of the ornaments which are so integral to the klezmer sound can only be approximated by Western staff notation – not to mention the patterns of improvised variation which are the cornerstone of the style. There will therefore be an emphasis on learning by ear as much as possible, but we will be using music in the form of lead sheets and other written instructional materials to supplement sound examples.

The class focuses on the study and performance of various traditions, including the klezmer traditions of New York between the two world wars, 19th century Eastern Europe, as well as original contemporary compositions. Emphasis will be on learning by ear, improvisation within a modal context, and learning to develop a cohesive ensemble sound. Concentration, practice, and good attendance are required of each ensemble member.

Admission is by audition during first class period of semester or prior to that, by appointment with the instructor.

MUEN 3645: Bluegrass Workshop

Richard Will
1.0 credit, Instructor permission
Lecture: T / 7:00-8:00 pm / Eunoia
Class Number: 16277

 

MUEN 3650: University Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11387

The University Singers is the University's premier SATB ensemble, performing a cappella and accompanied choral literature ranging from chant to the works of contemporary composers. Past repertoire has included Bach's Mass in B minor, Orff's Carmina Burana, the Duruflé Requiem, and Bernstein's Chichester Psalms, as well as shorter a cappella works. Recent trips have taken the group to Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Cincinnati, New Orleans, New York City, Philadelphia, and the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., as well as the campuses of other American universities for collaborative concerts. The group has also been heard on European tours in England, Italy, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland. Recent highlights have included performances with the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia, a concert and workshop with Bobby McFerrin, and a concert tour of the Southeastern U.S.

Students in the University Singers come from all six of UVA's undergraduate schools, including Arts and Sciences, Education, and Engineering, as well as several of the University's graduate and professional schools. Together, they enjoy an esprit de corps that arises from the pursuit of musical excellence and the camaraderie the singers develop offstage.

All singers at the University - undergraduates, graduate students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to audition. University Singers is offered for two hours academic credit. Michael Slon, who has conducted choruses at the Oberlin Conservatory and Indiana University School of Music, is the conductor. For more information on the University Singers, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/usingers/

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3651: Chamber Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: F / 1:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11386

Chamber Singers is a select ensemble drawn from the University Singers. The ensemble meets once a week and focuses on music for chamber choir ranging from the Renaissance to contemporary pieces. Recent performances have included the Monteverdi Mass for 4 voices (1651), Britten'sHymn to St. Cecilia, and Bach's Cantata 150, as well as contemporary works by Meredith Monk and Eric Whitacre, and arrangements of classic jazz standards by Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, and the King's Singers. Interested singers will be considered for the chamber ensemble as part of their University Singers audition. For more information, please visit our webpage.

Restricted to: Instructor permission

MUEN 3670: Early Music Ensemble: Baroque Orchestra

David Sariti
2.0 credit
Lecture: R / 7:00-9:00 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12224

The Baroque Orchestra, directed by David Sariti, offers students the rare opportunity to perform music of the 17th and 18th centuries on the instruments for which it was written, at low pitch. Students use period instruments from the University's extensive collection, receiving personal instruction on the special techniques necessary, and must be accomplished on their modern counterparts.

MUEN 3680: New Music Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11388

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Performance of vocal and instrumental music of the twentieth century.

A one-credit course at the University of Virginia, the New Music Ensemble explores and performs exciting music of our time. The ensemble consists of dedicated instrumentalists, singers and UVa performance faculty. We perform a wide variety of contemporary music suitable to our instrumentation, including new works created by UVa composers.

The New Music Ensemble seeks dedicated instrumentalists and singers to explore and perform a wide variety of contemporary music. To audition, come to the first class with your instrument. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

Open to UVA students, community musicians and advanced high school students.

 

 

Address

McIntire Department of Music
112 Old Cabell Hall
P.O. Box 400176 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4176

Email: music@virginia.edu