Profile

Faculty

Heather Frasch

Assistant Professor

Email

Biography

HEATHER FRASCH is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic concert music, performer/composer (flute, laptop/electronics & sonic objects), and creator of interactive sound installations and digital instruments. Through the creation of complex timbres, the usage of unstable notation systems, and electronics her work explores notions of fragility and stillness within an intermedia sonic arts practice. Influenced by the dis-embodiment of acousmatic music practices, she investigates the re-embodiment of sound and the intimacy between humans and their technological objects.

She co-runs mumei publishing which publishes online journals and monographs that concern text-sound perceptions. She is co-director of vibrant matter, a curatorial team who organize events that investigate the blurred boundaries between text/object and sound.   

She holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley and further degrees from IRCAM, CNR de Lyon, and Temple University. Frasch was composer-in-residence at the IEM (Institüt für Musik und Akustik) in Graz, Austria (2015) and at the Villa Ruffieux, in Sierre, Switzerland (2017). Other honors include: artist residency at the EMS in Stockholm (2014),  the George Ladd Prix de Paris in Composition (2008), International Sergei Slonimsky Composition Competition Prize (2012), and the Nicol DeLorernzo Prize in Composition (2010 and 2008). Her work has been performed at Moscow Autumn Festival, San Francisco Tape Festival, NYCEMF, Mixtur Festival, hcmf//, Akademie Schloss Solitude; and by the Ensemble SurPlus, sfSound, Vertixe Sonora, Adapter Ensemble, BCMP, among others. 

website: www.heatherfrasch.net


Michele Zaccagnini

Assistant Professor

Email

Biography

Michele Zaccagnini composes music for acoustic, electroacoustic and audio—visual media. His acoustic music has been performed in the US by ensembles such as the International Contemporary Ensemble of New York, Lydian String Quartet, White Rabbit, and in Europe  by the Dèdalo Ensemble and L’Arsenale. His current work is concerned with multi—media composition and music perception. His research on  has been presented at University of Plymouth within the First International Workshop of Brain Computer Music Interface, at the Ircam Forum Conference in Sao Paulo, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at Michigan Technological University within the 29th International Conference on Auditory Display. His scholarly work focuses on algorithmic composition and has been published by Perspective of New Music and by Ircam.

His teachers include Martin Boykan, Yu-Hui Chang, Frank Corcoran and Eric Chasalow.  

Website
 
current e:mail:

Kevin Davis

Instructor of Music

Old Cabell 215
Email
Kevin's Website

Biography

Kevin Davis is an improviser, composer, and cellist. Originally from Appalachian Tennessee, he has at various times been been based out of Memphis, Chicago, New York, and Istanbul. He has performed, improvised, and composed in a wide variety of situations, presenting work at in North America, Europe, and the Middle East, most recently at venues such as the Stone (NYC), Roulette (NYC), the Phillips Collection, Recess (NYC), Constellation (Chicago) and conferences such as TENOR (Cambridge, UK), SEAMUS (Society for Electro-Acoustic Music), and festivals such as New York Electronic Art Festival and the EcoSono Festival (AK), and others. His compositions have been performed by the Hezarfin Ensemble, Dither, Ekmeles, Never Enough Hope, Chicago Sound Map, and others. Collaborative projects include work with improvisers Dave Rempis, Woody Sullender, Mike Pride, and Jim Baker, with the groups Locksmith Isidore, the İstanbul-based Islak Köpek and Hoca Nasreddin, the Virginia/Chicago-based Restroy, the EcoSono ensemble and more. In addition to co-directing the MIAM Improvisation Ensemble and assistant directing the University of Virginia New Music Ensemble, Davis has played in the new music group Null Set and the University of Virginia Baroque Orchestra. Recordings of his music are available on Clean Feed, Contraphonic, Allos Documents, Creative Sources, Evil Rabbit, Re:construKt, Voice of Shade, and Parma Recordings.

Davis has degrees in music composition from the University of Memphis (BMus), the Centre for Advanced Musical Study (MIAM) in Istanbul (MA), and University of Virginia (MA, PhD). His doctoral dissertation concerns experimental forms of instrumentality and their effect on the shifting meaning of music composition. His current musical work reflects this research through works that embrace the mistranslation of formal structures—like poems, texts, or paintings—through the inexact media of movement, notation, and instrument. He is currently an Instructor at the University of Virginia, teaching courses in composition, music theory, and music technology.


Sandra Bain Cushman

Lecturer, Alexander Technique

Email

Biography

Sandra Bain Cushman’s passion for unlocking creative potential began with her theater studies at Cornell University in 1977. A certified teacher of the Alexander Technique since 1990, she has taught renowned musicians, writers, theater groups, medical professionals, and business leaders how to gain greater poise, balance, and freedom in their work and in their lives.

Sandra is the founder of Orchestral Maneuvers. OM offers creative strategies to groups and individuals, musicians and non-musicians alike.

Sandra worked with Robert Fripps Guitar Craft &Guitar Circles of North America, South America and Europe, from 1988-1990 and from 2000 until their completion in March of 2017.

In July of 2010 Sandra graduated from Jessica Wolf’s Art of Breathing training and holds a certificate in teaching breathing coordination. In October of 2011 she published Mind Body 40 Days, an AT-based support guide for those beginning mind-body practices.

Sandra lives on a mountainside in Virginia with poet and professor, Stephen Cushman. She has two grown sons, both of whom live in the West.


Leah Reid

Assistant Professor of Composition

Wilson 103

297-6985
Email
Leah Reid's Website

Biography

Leah Reid is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music. Her primary research interests involve the perception, modeling, and compositional applications of timbre. In her works, timbre acts as a catalyst for exploring new soundscapes, time, space, perception, and color.

In recent reviews, Reid’s works have been described as “immersive,” “haunting,” and “shimmering.” She has won numerous awards, including the International Alliance for Women in Music's Pauline Oliveros Prize for her piece Pressure and the Film Score Award for her piece Ring, Resonate, Resound in Frame Dance Productions’ Music Composition Competition. Her works are frequently performed throughout Europe and North America, with notable premieres by Accordant Commons, the Jack Quartet, McGill’s Contemporary Music Ensemble, Sound Gear, Talea, and Yarn/Wire. Her compositions have been presented at festivals, conferences, and in major venues throughout the world, including BEAST FEaST (England), EviMus (Germany), Forgotten Spaces: EuroMicrofest (Germany), the International Computer Music Conference (USA), IRCAM’s ManiFeste (France), the San Francisco Tape Music Festival (USA), the Sound and Music Computing Conference (Germany), the Tilde New Music Festival (Australia), and the Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (Canada) among many others. Samples of her music are available through Ablaze Records.   

Reid received her D.M.A. and M.A. in music composition from Stanford University and her B.Mus from McGill University. Reid’s principal teachers include Mark Applebaum, Jonathan Berger, Brian Ferneyhough, and Sean Ferguson. She has taught at Stanford University (Stanford, CA), University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA), and at Cogswell Polytechnical College (San Jose, CA). Reid is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Virginia, where she teaches courses in music composition and technology.


The SoundCloud content at https://soundcloud.com/leahreidmusic/ring-resonate-resound is not available, or it is set to private.

Benjamin Rous

Associate Professor of Music (Conducting) and Music Director of the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia

Office Hours: M/W, 1pm-2pm
Email

Biography

Admired for his dynamism on the podium, Benjamin Rous was named Music Director of the Charlottesville Symphony in the fall of 2017, and simultaneously joined the UVA music faculty. In 2018 he concluded an eight-year tenure as Resident Conductor of the Virginia Symphony Orchestra, where he conducted a broad range of Classics, Pops, and ballet performances, and created the new multimedia VSO@Roper series. Notable guest appearances include debuts with the National Symphony, the Buffalo Philharmonic, the Long Beach Symphony, and the Charleston Symphony. In the summers he serves as faculty conductor of Greenwood Music Camp in the Berkshires in western Massachusetts.

An accomplished instrumentalist, Rous has concertized extensively on violin, viola, and keyboard instruments. He has served as guest principal 2nd violin with Mahler Chamber Orchestra, with whom he performed under the batons of Claudio Abbado and Daniel Harding, including European tours and a teaching residency with El Sistema students in Caracas. He was a regular member of the Boston-area Arcturus Chamber Ensemble for a decade, and has led the Virginia Symphony Orchestra from the harpsichord in baroque repertoire.

Benjamin Rous studied music at Harvard with an emphasis on composition, graduating with highest honors. His works have been performed by diverse ensembles including the Virginia Symphony Orchestra, the Roanoke Symphony Orchestra, the Greenwood Orchestra, and the Fromm Players.


Kelly Peral

Lecturer, Oboe

Email

Biography

Kelly Peterson Peral is University of Virginia’s Lecturer in Oboe and Principal Oboe with the Charlottesville Symphony. Peral’s performance background includes extensive engagements with New York’s Metropolitan Opera, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, New York City Ballet, New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, numerous Broadway shows, Palm Beach Opera, Palm Beach Chamber Music Festival, The Florida Orchestra, New World Symphony, and Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, among others. Most recently she has enjoyed engagements with Roanoke Symphony, Richmond Symphony, Williamsburg Symphony, and Norfolk’s Virginia Symphony.

An enthusiastic educator, Ms. Peral has served on the faculties of The Juilliard School Pre-College Division, Miami’s New World School of the Arts and Florida International University, as well as the Cleveland Music School Settlement. She had the honor of teaching at the 2016 John Mack Oboe Camp in Little Switzerland, NC, a tremendous opportunity to continue sharing John Mack’s legacy with more than fifty oboists from throughout the United States and Canada. 

Having grown up in Central Virginia, Ms. Peral is grateful for her early musical training in Charlottesville with Yvaine Duisit (piano) and David Goza (oboe). Her first orchestral experience was as a member of the Charlottesville Youth Orchestra YOCVA. Ms. Peral finished high school at Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan, after which she made her solo debut at the John F. Kennedy Center Concert Hall as a 1987 NFAA Presidential Scholar in the Arts. Ms. Peral holds degrees in music performance from The Juilliard School (MM) and the Cleveland Institute of Music (BM). Her major teachers include Elaine Douvas, John Mack, and Daniel Stolper.

Ms. Peral currently lives in Orange, her hometown, with her daughter Sydney. She also enjoys gardening, exploring local farms, tap dancing, great books, and her entertaining cat and chickens. She is proud to see her parents still performing with the Orange Community Band which they helped establish in 1978.


A.D. Carson

Assistant Professor of Hip Hop and the Global South

Wilson 121
Office Hours: T/Th 8A - 9A (Wilson 121); Rap lab open hours: T/Th 11A - 1P (NCH 398)
Email

Biography

A.D. Carson is a performance artist and educator from Decatur, Illinois. He received his Ph.D. in Rhetorics, Communication, and Information Design at Clemson University doing work that focuses on race, literature, history, and rhetorical performances. A 2016 recipient of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Award for Excellence in Service at Clemson, Carson worked with students, staff, faculty, and community members to raise awareness of historic, entrenched racism at the university through his See the Stripes campaign, which takes its name from his 2014 poem. His dissertation, “Owning My Masters: The Rhetorics of Rhymes & Revolutions, is a digital archive that features a 34 track rap album and was recognized by the Graduate Student Government as the 2017 Outstanding Dissertation. 

Carson is an award-winning artist with essays, music, and poetry published at a variety of diverse venues such as The GuardianQuiddity International Literary Journal and Public-Radio Program, and Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory, among others. His essay “Trimalchio from Chicago: Flashing Lights and the Great Kanye in West Egg” appears in The Cultural Impact of Kanye West (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), and “Oedipus—Not So Complex: A Blueprint for Literary Education” is in Jay-Z: Essays on Hip Hop’s Philosopher King (McFarland & Co., 2011). Carson has written a novel, COLD, which hybridizes poetry, rap lyrics, and prose, and The City: [un]poems, thoughts, rhymes & miscellany, a collection of poems, short stories, and essays. 

Carson is currently assistant professor in Hip-Hop and the Global South at the University of Virginia.

Follow A.D. Carson on Twitter/IG @aydeethegreat.


Brenda Patterson

Instructor, Voice

Email

Biography

Mezzo-soprano Brenda Patterson has been at the forefront of contemporary vocal music for over 15 years, recognized as much for her artistic bravery as for the beauty and warmth of her voice. A graduate of The Juilliard School (where she was the Winner of the Taranow Prize in Voice) and Barnard College, Brenda was at the Hamburg State Opera before continuing to La Scala in Milan and the Metropolitan Opera, where she was on the roster for seven seasons, and at Opera Colorado, Glimmerglass Opera, Lyric Opera of Kansas City, and Florida Grand Opera, among many others. Brenda has premiered over 30 vocal works, is an official vocal consultant to the composers-in-residence at Opera Philadelphia. She is also a co-founder and the Director of Music of Victory Hall Opera in Charlottesville, VA.


Richard Will

Richard Will

Associate Professor (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Randall 122

434-297-7649
Email
Richard Will's Website

Biography

Richard Will holds appointments in the Department of Music and the Department of Drama. He received his bachelor’s degree from U.C. Santa Cruz and his doctorate from Cornell. He began teaching at UVa in 2001, following several years at the University of Washington. His courses focus on opera, 18th-century music, and bluegrass performance. He is currently Chair of the Drama Department (2018-21) and was previously Chair of the Music Department (2010-15).

Will’s research focuses on opera, classical music, and folk music of America and Europe. He is completing a new book, Don Giovanni Live: Performance, Media, Myth. Previous publications include The Characteristic Symphony in the Age of Haydn and Beethoven (Cambridge University Press, 2002); Engaging Haydn: Culture, Context, and Criticism (co-editor; Cambridge University Press, 2012); and numerous essays on opera, orchestral music, religious music, and folk music.

A bluegrass fiddler and singer, Will performs frequently and hosts a regular jam session for members of the university and Charlottesville communities.


Mimi Tung

Mimi Tung

Instructor, Piano

Email

Biography

Pianist Mimi Tung graduated from The Julliard School of Music and has studied with world-renowned pianists Edward Steuermann, Aube Tzerko and Leon Fleischer. She has performed as a soloist with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, the Hong Kong Philharmonic, the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, the Boston Pops Orchestra, and the Charlottesville Symphony under Walter Susskind, Arthur Fiedler, and Leon Kirchner, among others. She has appeared on television and been heard on radio stations in major cities including WQRX New York, KQED Televison San Francisco, Radio Hong Kong, KNME Television Albuquerque, KHFM Albuquerque, KFUO St. Louis and in Charlottesville. Beside the University of Virginia, Mimi has also taught at the Cleveland Institute of Music, the St. Louis Music Conservatory, and the University of California. In February 2010, Mimi Tung performed the Chopin Piano Concerto No. 2 with the Charlottesville Symphony conducted by Kate Tamarkin.

From a review of a Washington Post on Mimi Tung's performance in Washington DC:".....Striking the perfect balance between clarity and rhapsody, Tung swaggered through the imperial flourishes of the first movement, and infused the finale with a strong spirit of dance. This is a pianist who knows how to attack and release Beethoven's phrases, how to let them accrue weight, how to point their rhythms in a way that carries the listener forward....."


Butch Taylor

Butch Taylor

Instructor, Jazz Piano

Email

Biography

A Virginia native, Butch Taylor is best known for his work as a guest keyboardist/vocalist with Dave Matthews Band from 1997 to 2008, performing both on tour and studio albums. In the late 1980’s, he performed with the jazz-fusion group “SECRETS” as well as with Miles Davis, Ramsey Lewis, Michael Brecker, Stanley Jordan, Yellowjackets, Bill Bruford, and Wayne Shorter. Throughout his career, he has been active and successful as a freelance performer, arranger, composer, vocalist, conductor, and producer. He received bachelor and master degrees in music from James Madison University and later served on their faculty. Butch Taylor is the pianist / keyboardist for the Free Bridge Quintet, the facutly jazz quintet at the Universtity of Virginia.  He also serves as a professor of jazz piano at UVA.  Butch Taylor is currently the Chief Engineer/Producer/Composer at Ravensworth Studios in Scottsville, VA.


Kelly Sulick

Lecturer, Flute

Email
Kelly Sulick's Website

Biography

Kelly Sulick currently teaches at the University of Virginia and serves as Principal Flute in the Charlottesville Symphony. Prior to her appointment, she served as Principal Flute with the Evansville Philharmonic Orchestra and as Consortium Instructor of Flute at the University of Evansville for three years. She earned her Master of Music degree in Flute Performance from the University of Southern California; prior to her graduate studies, she earned a Bachelor of Music degree in Flute Performance and a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan, where she graduated with highest honors and was named a James B. Angell Scholar for her academic achievements. 

An active orchestral musician, Ms. Sulick has performed with the Richmond Symphony Orchestra, the Ash Lawn Opera Orchestra, the Owensboro Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra Kentucky, and the Livingston (MI) Symphony. She completed three seasons as principal flute with the Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra in Los Angeles, California. Hailed as “flawless” by the Evansville Courier Press for a concerto performance with the Evansville Philharmonic Orchestra, Sulick has also appeared as a concerto soloist with ensembles throughout the country, including the Southern Illinois Music Festival Orchestra, the Charlottesville Symphony, and most recently the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra and alongside Sir James Galway at the Kennedy Center. Equally at home on the concert and popular stages, Ms. Sulick has performed and recorded with several rock bands, including The New Fidelity, a Mod-Power Pop outfit from southern California; Superdot, a world music group based in Detroit; Homesick Elephant, a folk duo from Los Angeles; and Michigan singer-songwriter Timothy Monger. 

A champion of new music, she has commissioned and recorded dozens of works for solo flute and flute with electronics, and has premiered several additional works for solo flute and chamber ensemble. She has performed at the SEAMUS National Conference, the Atlas INTERSECTIONS festival, the TomTom Founders Festival, the Technosonics Festival, and the Minimalist Jukebox series, a music festival curated by John Adams. She has worked with such notable composers as Leslie Bassett, William Bolcom, Matthew Burtner, Evan Chambers, Michael Daugherty, Karel Husa, Daniel Kessner, Lowell Liebermann, Judith Shatin, and Frank Ticheli, among others.

An avid chamber musician, she is the co-founder of .thrum, a new music collective, and is a member of the EcoSono Ensemble, an eco-acoustic cohort that explores connections between music, technology, and environmental activism. She also performs regularly as a member of the Albemarle Ensemble, the University of Virginia faculty woodwind quintet, and serves as Director of the University of Virginia Chamber Music Series.

Ms. Sulick maintains a national profile as a performer and educator, having performed and presented at six National Flute Association Conventions, the International Double Reed Society Conference, the Richmond Flute Fest, and at multiple Mid-Atlantic Flute Conventions. She has given masterclasses throughout the country; most recent engagements include the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Penn State University Flute Day, Virginia Tech, Western Kentucky University, CalArts, and San Diego State University. She served as Guest Artist for the 2012 Hampton Roads Flute Faire. Active within the flute community, she currently serves as Vice President of the Flute Society of Washington and as Chair of the Flute Club Committee of the National Flute Association, and was the Volunteer Coordinator for the 2015 National Flute Association Convention in Washington, D.C. She also founded the University of Virginia Flute Forum,  a free annual flute festival featuring guest artists, masterclasses, and recitals accessible to all members of the community.

Ms. Sulick won second place in the 2010 National Flute Association's Young Artist Competition, and was awarded the prize for the best performance of Kristin P. Kuster's "Perpetual Afternoon." She can be heard on several compact discs, including William Bolcom's “Songs of Innocence and of Experience” under Leonard Slatkin, a Naxos release that received four Grammy awards including Best Classical Album. 

Her principal teachers include Marina Piccinini, Amy Porter, and Jim Walker.


Peter Spaar

Peter Spaar

Lecturer, Double Bass

Email

Biography

Master of Music from University of North Texas, Bachelor of Music from James Madison University. His former teachers include Sam Cross, Ed Rainbow, Tom Lederer and Mark Bernat. Mr. Spaar currently holds the Robert and Ruth Cross Principal Bass Chair in the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia. He is the founder and bassist of the Free Bridge Quintet, U.Va.'s jazz quintet-in-residence. He is also a member of the Richmond Symphony Orchestra. In addition to his teaching duties, Mr. Spaar maintains a very active freelance career as both a jazz and classical bassist.


Michael Slon

Michael Slon

Associate Professor, Director of Choral Music

Old Cabell B013
Office Hours: Monday/Wednesday, 1-2pm (& by appointment)

434-924-6504
Email

Biography

Active as a conductor of choral, orchestral, and operatic repertoire, Michael Slon is Director of Choral Music and Associate Professor at the University of Virginia, where he conducts the University Singers, UVA Chamber Singers and also guest conducts the Charlottesville Symphony. His ensembles have recently sung for composer Philip Glass, and the creators of Les Misérables – Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schönberg – during their UVA residencies, and taken a two-week European concert tour. Since 2011, he has also served as Music Director of the Oratorio Society of Virginia. In that time, he has created a series of new artistic partnerships with the chorus, including an acclaimed 2014 semi-staged production of Bernstein’s Candide with Ash Lawn (now Charlottesville) Opera, a 2015 collaboration with the Charlottesville Ballet on Honegger’s King David, performances with regional orchestras and youth choruses, and a Community Sing-In to benefit local charities. Repertoire with the choruses has also included Mendelssohn’s Elijah, Handel’s Messiah, Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, Verdi’s Requiem and La Traviata, Stravinsky’s Symphony of Psalms, Bernstein’s Chichester Psalms, Bach’s St. John Passion and Mass in B minor, Britten’s Ceremony of Carols, and a range of shorter a cappella and accompanied works.

After substituting on one hour’s notice for a performance of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 1, Slon served in the 2005-2006 season as Interim Director of the Charlottesville Symphony, leading performances of Bartok’s Concerto for Orchestra, Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2, Mahler’s Symphony No. 4, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7, and Copland’s Appalachian Spring.  In 2005, he also created the University Singers-Symphony Family Holiday Concerts, now a beloved Charlottesville tradition. His opera and musical theatre engagements have included a production of Stephen Paulus’s The Three Hermits with Buffalo’s Opera Sacra, regional premieres of Sondheim’s Sunday in the Park with George and Guettel’s The Light in the Piazza with the Heritage Theatre Festival, South Pacific and The Magic Flute with Ash Lawn Opera, and Into the Woods and Bernstein’s Mass at Indiana University. He is also active as a guest conductor for honors choirs and orchestras, and as a musician deeply committed to the education of young musicians, was recognized in 2006-2007 as a member of UVA's Mead Honored Faculty, recognizing outstanding faculty mentors.  

Prior to UVA, he served as visiting conducting faculty at the Oberlin Conservatory, and as assistant conductor of the Cornell University choruses and Cincinnati’s May Festival Chorus, where he prepared and co-prepared choruses for concerts with the Cleveland Orchestra and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. His ensembles have worked with artists including Moses Hogan, Bobby McFerrin, Meredith Monk, Peter Phillips, and Franz Welser-Möst, and taken on commissioning projects with composers including Stephen Paulus, Forrest Pierce, Eric Whitacre, and Judith Shatin. Also a pianist, composer/arranger, and writer, Dr. Slon holds degrees from the Indiana University School of Music and Cornell University, where he was named a member of Phi Beta Kappa. His first book, Songs from the Hill, has been cited in a variety of other publications, and his work on Leonard Bernstein recently received the national Julius Herford Prize from the American Choral Directors Association (ACDA). As a composer, he recently had work presented by the Vocalis Chamber Choir in concert at NYC’s Merkin Hall, and will have work performed at the 2018 ACDA Eastern Convention.


Judith Shatin

Judith Shatin

Professor Emeritus -William R. Kenan Jr. Professor (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Email
Judith Shatin's Website

Biography

Judith Shatin is a composer, sound artist and community arts partner, whose music, called ‘something magical’ by Fanfare, draws on expanded instrumental palettes and a cornucopia of the sounding world, from machines in a coal mine, to the calls of animals, the shuttle of a wooden loom, a lawnmower racing up the Lawn. Timbral exploration, cross-boundary acoustic and digital media, and dynamic narrative design are fundamental to her music. A Clay Fellow of the Humanities (2015), Shatin was educated at Douglass College (AB, Phi Beta Kappa), The Juilliard School (MM) and Princeton University (MFA, PhD). She is William R. Kenan Jr. Professor at UVA, where she founded Virginia Center for Computer Music, and has received the Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award from the University’s Z Society.

Her courses range from Songwriting and Computer Music to seminars on topics such as Parsing the Electroacoustic. Her music has been commissioned by organizations including the Barlow Endowment and Fromm Foundation, Carnegie Hall, the Library of Congress, Ensemble Berlin PianoPercussion, Kronos Quartet, the National Symphony and many others. She has received four NEA Composer Fellowships as well as grants from the American Music Center, Lila Acheson Wallace-Readers Digest Arts Partners Program, Meet the Composer; and the Virginia Commission for the Arts. Twice a fellow at the Rockefeller Center in Bellagio, she has also held residencies at Brahmshaus, La Cité des Arts, MacDowell, Mishkan Omanim, Yaddo and the Virginia Center for Creative Arts. Festivals where her music has been featured include Aspen, BAM Next Wave, Havanah in Springtime, West Cork, and many others. Also in demand as a master teacher, Shatin has served as senior composer at the Wellesley Composers Conference, Master Artist at the Atlantic Center for the Arts, featured composer at the Chamber Music Conference of the East, and senior faculty at California Summer Music. Her film collaboration Rotunda, with Robert Arnold, is based on visual and sonic recordings made over the course of an entire year. An excerpt may be viewed here.

 

 

 


Daniel Sender

Daniel Sender

Associate Professor

Email

Biography

Daniel Sender enjoys a diverse musical career and has appeared in concerts throughout the United States, Canada, Europe and China.  A frequent guest soloist and principal artist with chamber and symphony orchestras throughout the region, Dr. Sender currently serves as concertmaster of the Charlottesville Symphony, Charlottesville Opera and the Virginia Consort.

Dr. Sender was a Fulbright Scholar in Budapest and attended the Franz Liszt Academy of Music as a student of Vilmos Szabadi.  He was formerly the first violinist of the Adelphi String Quartet, which held a fellowship residency at the University of Maryland, and was for four years the violinist of the Annapolis Chamber Players.  Dr. Sender has recorded for Centaur, Sono Luminus, Bifrost and other independent labels.

As a chamber musician, Dr. Sender has had the pleasure of performing with members of the Audubon Quartet, Axelrod and Left Bank quartets and spent two years working intensively under the mentorship of the Guarneri Quartet. Chamber concerts have taken him to venues around the world including the Kennedy Center, Hungarian Embassy, Bartók Hall of the Erdödy Palace (Budapest), Smithsonian Museum of American History, Universität der Kunste (Berlin) and the Museum of Fine Arts (Montreal).

A native of Philadelphia, Dr. Sender attended Ithaca College, the University of Maryland, the Liszt Academy (Budapest) and the Institute for European Studies (Vienna).  His primary teachers include Vilmos Szabadi, Arnold Steinhardt, David Salness, René Staar, and Gerald Fischbach. He is on the performance faculty of the University of Virginia’s McIntire Department of Music and also holds a faculty position at Interlochen’s Adult Chamber Music Camp.

 


David Sariti

David Sariti

Associate Professor

Email

Biography

Violinist David Sariti enjoys a multifaceted career, with performance and research interests that span four centuries.  Known for bringing fresh interpretive insight to works both familiar and unfamiliar, he has recently appeared as recitalist at universities across the country, as soloist with orchestra, and in diverse chamber collaborations.  A recent all-Mendelssohn piano trio program was hailed as “Chamber music at a high professional level, reflecting credit on the schools that choose to have their students taught by musicians who not only have academic credentials but are also first-class performing artists.” (Classical Voice of North Carolina).  An ardent proponent of new music, he has performed works by composers throughout the Southeast including UVA Professor Emeritus Judith Shatin.

Equally at home with earlier repertoires on the Baroque violin, Sariti has appeared with many notable chamber ensembles and orchestras, including the Washington Bach Consort, The Vivaldi Project, and others.  He is a member of “Mr. Jefferson’s Musicians”, which was founded along with members of the Baltimore Consort to perform music from the collection of Thomas Jefferson in a scholarly and musically engaging way.  The group was recently featured on the Gotham Early Music series in New York.  He has given numerous solo presentations on Jefferson’s music, and is featured on the CD “Music from the Jefferson Collection”.  An improviser of music both old and new, he also plays jazz with Greg Howard, John D’earth, and others.

Faculty at UVa since 2005, he is Director of the period-instrument Baroque Orchestra, performs in the Rivanna Quartet, and is Principal Violin II of the Charlottesville Symphony, having previously performed in over a dozen professional symphonies. His studio teaching emphasizes the development of a relaxed, efficient technique and comprehensive musicianship skills that enable students to make informed interpretive choices.  In 2016-17 he was chosen as part of the first cohort of College of Arts and Sciences Arts Fellows.  He has also taught violin and music history at the Hartt School, University of Hartford, and recently completed a term as Performance Chair of the College Music Society Mid-Atlantic Chapter.  His articles on topics ranging from performance practice to string pedagogy have been featured in Early Music America, American String Teacher, and American Music Teacher. He holds degrees from the Hartt School, the University of Akron, and Ithaca College; studies were with Pamela Gearhart, Katie Lansdale, Pamela Frank and members of the Cleveland and Miami quartets and the Meadowmount Trio.

 


Joel Rubin

Joel Rubin

Associate Professor, Director of Music Performance

Old Cabell 207
Office Hours: Tuesday, 12:30-1:30pm (& by appointment)

434-924-6499
Email
Joel Rubin's Website

Biography

Joel Rubin is Associate Professor of Music in the Performance Program at the University of Virginia. He attended the California Institute of the Arts and received a BFA in clarinet performance from the State University of New York at Purchase (1978). His principal teachers were Richard Stoltzman and Kalmen Opperman. Rubin holds a Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from City University of London (2001).

Rubin is an internationally acclaimed performer of Jewish instrumental klezmer music and hasidic music. In addition to performances with traditional musicians such as the Epstein Brothers (USA) and Moshe Berlin (Israel), he has been the founder and clarinetist of some of the most internationally respected klezmer ensembles, including the Joel Rubin Jewish Music Ensemble and Brave Old World. Rubin also performs with the R2G Klezmer Trio, and collaborates regularly with renowned artists such as the trio Veretski Pass, composer and jazz pianist Uri Caine, and accordionist and pianist Alan Bern. His seventh solo album, "Azoy Tsu Tsveyt" with Caine, was chosen by exclaim. ca as one of 10 favorites in the category Improv & Avant-Garde for 2011, and “Midnight Prayer” was named one of the best recordings of 2007 by the Jewish Week. His newest recording, “Poyln: A Gilgul (Poland: A Metamorphosis, Golden Horn, 2015),” a collaboration with the Berkeley-based trio Veretski Pass, received a 5-star review from the influential world music magazine, Songlines. His music can be heard in several films, including the French Feature film, "L'armée du crime" (The Army of Crime, 2009) and the award-winning documentary portrait "A Tickle in the Heart" (Germany/Switz./USA 1996), which is based on his research and screenplay.

Rubin has concertized throughout Europe, North America and Asia. As a clinician, he has taught together with Kalmen Opperman and Richard Stoltzman at the Clarinet Summit (2004) and held master classes and workshops at the University of Oregon, the New England Conservatory of Music, Indiana University, Yale University, Syracuse University, for the Israeli and Berlin Ministries of Education, as well as at Yiddish Summer Weimar, KlezKanada, KlezKamp (New York), KlezFest London (SOAS, University of London), and the International Master Classes at the World Klezmer Center in Safed, Israel, among others.

Rubin wrote the first full-length doctoral thesis on Jewish instrumental klezmer music, combining extensive ethnographic work among the oldest surviving generation of American klezmer musicians with historical and analytical methods to examine the cultural and musical milieu of Eastern European Jewish immigrant wedding instrumentalists in New York in the early 20th century. His most current research is on Yiddish music in contemporary Germany. Further research interests include: music and trauma; music and professionalism; music and diaspora; music and identity; music and religion; folk music revivals; musical hybridity; hasidic music; American Jewish popular music; Jewish musical traditions of the Middle East and beyond; and art and urban popular traditions of the Balkans, Turkey and the Middle East. Rubin is co-author of the books "Klezmer-Musik" (Bärenreiter/dtv, 1999) and "Jüdische Musiktraditionen" (Jewish Musical Traditions; Gustav Bosse-Verlag, 2001), the author of "Mazltov! Jewish-American Wedding Music for Clarinet" (Schott Musik International, 1998), and the co-curator of the Jewish Music Series of CDs for Schott's Wergo as well of as the Trikont Klezmer Trilogy. He wrote the liner notes to the CD anthology, Chekhov’s Band: Eastern European Klezmer Music from the EMI Archives 1908-1913 (Renair Records, 2015), which was a finalist in the Association for Recorded Sound Collections’ Awards for Excellence in Historical Recorded Sound Research in 2015. Rubin’s article, “‘With an open mind and with respect’: Klezmer as a Site of the Jewish Fringe in Germany in the Early 21st Century” appeared in the collection, Dislocated Memories: Jews, Music, and Postwar German Culture (Oxford University Press, 2014), which received the Ruth A. Solie Award from the American Musicological Society in 2015. Other recent articles and chapters appeared in Ethnomusicology ForumJüdischer Almanach (Leo Baeck Institute), and and the Cambridge Companion to Jewish Music. He has received grants from the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture, the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research (Vladimir and Pearl Heifetz Memorial Fellowship, Joseph Kremen Memorial Fellowship), Cornell Council for the Arts, and the Pro Musica Viva Foundation. Prior to UVa, he taught at Cornell University, Syracuse University, Ithaca College and Humboldt Universität Berlin.

 


Mike Rosensky

Michael Rosensky

Instructor, Guitar (Jazz & Classical)

Email

Biography

Studies with Emily Remler. Has taught at Longwood College, the Tandem School, and Piedmont Community College. Extensive freelance experience as a jazz guitarist, including performances with the Mike Rosensky/Jeff Decker Quartet. Has appeared in concert in New York City with the New Music Consort, the Manhattan Chamber Orchestra, and Christopher Lamb, principal percussionist with the New York Philharmonic, along with other chamber and contemporary music performances at Symphony Space, Merkin Concert Hall, Weill Recital Hall, and at the Bowdoin and Brandeis summer music festivals. Co-founder of the New Music Chamber Ensemble, Ekko!


Elizabeth Roberts

Elizabeth Roberts

Lecturer, Bassoon

Email

Biography

Elizabeth Roberts, Principal Bassoon and Director of Youth Education for the Charlottesville Symphony since 2001, joined the faculty at the University of Virginia the same year.  She became a member of the Virginia Symphony Orchestra as their contrabassoonist beginning in the 2017-18 season, and has played Second Bassoon with the Williamsburg Symphony Orchestra since 2015.  Ms. Roberts was the Visiting Assistant Professor of Bassoon at the University of Missouri for the 2013-2014 academic year.  She freelances on bassoon and contrabassoon with the Philadelphia Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra, Richmond Symphony, Washington National Opera, and Baltimore Symphony.  Ms. Roberts joined the faculty of the New England Music Camp during the summer of 2017.  She was a 2008 Virginia Governor’s Award for the Arts nominee, and has given world premiere performances of works by Arthur Weisberg, Bernard Rands, Barbara York, Gary Schocker, and Walter Ross.  Ms. Roberts has performed as a soloist with the Charlottesville Symphony, the Roanoke Symphony, the Harid Conservatory Orchestra and the Waynesboro Orchestra, and was invited to perform as a soloist and chamber musician at the International Double Reed Society conference in 2010 (OK), 2013 (CA), 2014 (NY), and 2017 (WI).
 

Ms. Roberts has taught bassoon, reedmaking, and chamber music in the Charlottesville, VA area since 2001, and has performed and taught at the Wintergreen Performing Arts Festival (VA), Beyond the Notes (UVA), where she served as Artistic Director, Music Mind and Reading (NC), the Cascade Festival of Music (OR) and the Coastal Youth Symphony Camp (GA), where she served as Program Director.  She currently serves as the Music Advisor for Crozet Arts. Ms. Roberts earned a Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education from the University of Illinois, a Professional Studies Diploma and a Bachelor of Music from the Harid Conservatory, and a Master of Music from the University of Southern California, where she was elected to both Pi Kappa Lambda and USC Presidential Fellows, and received the Dean’s Special Commendation.  Her principal teachers were Arthur Weisberg, Stephen Maxym, and Frank Morelli.  She has pursued additional studies on bassoon with Nancy Goeres and on contrabassoon with Lew Lipnick and Holly Blake.

 


Michael Puri

Michael Puri

Associate Professor (Critical & Comparative Studies), Director of Graduate Studies

Randall 124
Office Hours: Thursdays, 2-4pm

434-982-2390
Email
Michael Puri's Website

Biography

A dutiful but unenthusiastic classical pianist in my youth, I suddenly became quite serious about music when I was sixteen and for the rest of high school spent an inordinate amount of time practicing and listening to classical repertoire. My desire to develop this newfound passion alongside my abiding interest in academics launched me on a journey which ultimately included not only a handful of degrees—B.A. in Music and German at Harvard, undergraduate and graduate diplomas in piano performance from the Music Academy in Basel, Switzerland, and an M. Phil. and Ph.D. in Music Theory from Yale—but also work as a programmer and announcer at a radio station (WHRB in Cambridge, MA), and as a volunteer in the community. Immediately after receiving my doctoral degree in 2004 I came to Charlottesville to teach in the McIntire Department of Music at the University of Virginia. I maintain my life as a performer by giving lecture-recitals on grounds; as a member of UVa's Center for German Studies, I have recently discussed and performed Brahms's op. 5 piano sonata, Robert Schumann's Kreisleriana and Nachtstücke, and Liszt's Funérailles.   

Just as I seek to balance musical performance and academics in my personal life, I also seek to balance technical with more humanistic approaches to music in my scholarly work. My equal investment in fields within music academia (music theory and historical musicology, in particular) and beyond it (literary and critical theory) has motivated me to explore the deep cultural implication of music without sacrificing attention to compositional detail. This synthetic method informs each of the eight chapters of my monograph, Ravel the Decadent: Memory, Sublimation, and Desire (Oxford, 2011). By broaching topics such as dandyism, traumatic and redemptive memory, idylls, and bacchanals, it traces the aesthetic origins of the music of Maurice Ravel (1875–1937) to the artistic movement of the French Decadence.

In addition to this book, my effort to wed music analysis to the interpretation of culture has led me to engage with the music and thought of Wagner, Adorno, Jankélévitch, and Gadamer; essays on these and other topics appear in a variety of journals—Journal of the American Musicological Society, Music Analysis, 19th-Century Music, Music Theory Online, and Cambridge Opera Journal, among others—and in several edited collections. (Bibliography and pdfs can be found on my personal webpage.) I am currently writing a second monograph, Sympathetic Resonances, which seeks to challenge the long-standing opposition between German Romanticism and early French Modernism by highlighting moments of sonic, cultural, and historical coincidence between the two.

At the University of Virginia I have taught a variety of courses. At the undergraduate level this has included the entire major-level theory sequence, as well as seminars on nineteenth-century music, program music, French music at the fin de siècle, and Schenkerian analysis. Doctoral seminar topics have included memory studies, Wagner (The Ring, Lohengrin, and Parsifal), the interarts, humor, and the analysis of music-text relations in art song.

For my research I have received financial support from many institutions, including the American Philosophical Society, the Javits Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the Whiting Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), the American Musicological Society, and the Society for Music Theory. For an essay on Ravel's dandyism I received the 2008 Alfred Einstein Award from the American Musicological Society, which recognizes the best article written by an early-career scholar in the previous year. During the 2013–14 academic year I was in residence at the National Humanities Center as its Delta Delta Delta Fellow. I am currently Director of Graduate Studies for my department and Review Editor (2017–19) for the Journal of the American Musicological Society.

 


William Pease

William Pease

Associate Professor, Director of Bands

Hunter Smith Band Building (180 Culbreth Road)

434-982-5347
Email

Biography

William E. Pease is Director of Bands at the University of Virginia. Mr. Pease is the first marching band director of the newly formed Cavalier Marching Band in 2003. Since that time the Cavalier Marching band has grown to 295 members which performs at many athletic and academic events for the University. Mr. Pease has also taken the UVA band on three international trips to Fiji, Australia, Brazil and Costa Rica. Responsibilities include, Director of the Cavalier Marching Band, Wind Ensemble, and Men's Basketball band. Mr. Pease is a former Associate Director of Bands at Western Michigan University, in Kalmazoo, Michigan. Mr. Pease also taught public school in the Va. Beach Public school system for 9 years. During this time his bands performed at state and national music conventions. Mr. Pease was a member of the 1983 World Champion Garfield Cadets Drum and Bugle Corps.

Mr. Pease is a national adjudicator for marching band concert bands and guest conducts yearly in the Southeastern part of the United States.

Mr. Pease is a member of the Music Educators National Conference, the College Band Directors National Association, the ACC Band Directors Association, the Virginia Band and Orchestra Director's association, and an educational endorser for Vic-Firth drum stick company and Sabian cymbals.

 


Chris Owens

Chris Owens

Instructor, Voice

Email
Chris Owens' Website

Biography

Christian Dwight Owens began his professional career as an apprentice with Houston Grand Opera and Santa Fe Opera. After his recent transition from baritone to tenor, career highlights include Radames in Aida with Indianapolis Opera; Radames in Aida and Cavaradossi in Tosca with New York Grand Opera, Malcolm in a concert performance of Macbeth with Collegiate Chorale at Carnegie Hall, and concerts in Hawaii, Virginia, the District of Columbia, and Alabama.

As a baritone, he sang the role of Sharpless in Madama Butterfly (Houston Grand Opera and Washington Opera), Der Heerufer in Lohengrin and Schaunard in La Boheme (Houston Grand Opera), Albert in Werther and The Mogul in the world premiere of Argento's The Dream of Valentino (Washington Opera). Other major roles include Michele in Il Tabarro, Horace Tabor in The Ballad of Baby Doe, Escamillo in Carmen, Top in The Tender Land (Copland), Il Conte di Luna in Il Trovatore, Germont in La Traviata, Figaro in Il Barbiere di Siviglia, Figaro and Il Conte in Le nozze di Figaro, Tonio in I Pagliacci, Alfio in Cavaleria Rusticana, and Bilby in Bilby's Doll (with Carlyle Floyd).

The vast list of artists Mr. Owens has performed opposite includes Cecilia Bartoly, Jose Carreras, Mignon Dunn, Placido Domingo, Richard Paul Fink, Mirella Freni, Eva Marton, and Juan Pons. He has performed roles under the baton of such internationally known conductors as Yves Abel, Placido Domingo, John Demain, Christoph Eschenbach, Heinz Fricke, Christopher Keene, Vincent LaSelva, and Julius Rudel.

Mr. Owens academic credentials include degrees from Samford University (Birmingham), Southern Seminary (Louisville), and post graduate studies at University of Cincinnati's College-Conservatory of Music and University of Houston. His teachers and coaches include Arthur Levy, Andrew White, Randall Richardson, Elena Nikolaidi, Martin Katz, Craig Rutenberg and Thomas Grubb.
Concert highlights include Carmina Burana with The Houston Symphony Chorus in Mexico City and The Alabama Symphony and Ballet, Mozart's Requiem with The Alabama Symphony and The Virginia Consort, a Wagner Gala with The Hawaii Opera Theater, and a concert of Wagner arias and scenes at the German Embassy, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Owens has received generous support from The Corbett Foundation, The Dieterle Foundation, The Sullivan Foundation, The Olga Forrai Foundation, The New York Wagner Society, and The Washington Wagner Society. His website is www.chiatenor.com.

 


Stephanie Nakasian

Stephanie Nakasian (aka Patricia O'Brien)

Instructor, Non-Classical Voice

Email
Stephanie Nakasian's Website

Biography

Stephanie Nakasian (BA, MBA, Northwestern Univ.) is recognized by the Biographical Encyclopedia of Jazz as one of the leading jazz singers in the world today with 13 CDs as a leader and numerous radio broadcasts for the internationally syndicated radio show Riverwalk. She was featured on Terry Gross' public radio show "Fresh Air," and was called "the Renaissance woman of jazz" by allaboutjazz.com .  She is the author of the book "It's not on the Page! How to Integrate Jazz and Jazz Rhythm into Choral and Solo Repertoire" which she has presented in workshops at over 20 state and national music education conferences including the MENC, MTNA and IAJE nationals. Her latest book "You already know how to sing:Voice lessons - Life lessons" is used as a text for her private lessons and includes two CDs of useful and fun exercises.   Her jazz style is compared to Ella Fitzgerald, June Christy and Rosemary Clooney and her improvisation workshops are popular with students from elementary school through professional levels and teacher training seminars around the U.S. and in Europe. Her performances as a headliner include the Kennedy Center, Lincoln center, Northsea Jazz Festival, JazzPartyatSea Cruise, NC Jazz Festival...and hundreds of school and club concerts. She was married to and musically partnered with the late jazz piano great Hod O'Brien and they have a daughter who is also a professional jazz singer and recording artist, Veronica Swift -age 23.

Ms. Nakasian's teaching is both technique and coaching oriented for non-classical repertoire students including theater, pop, folk, rock, gospel and jazz. Students learn to use their voices safely and effectively opening up tone and strengthening sound and correcting flaws in pitch and quality while working on repertoire of the student's choosing. A optional recital opportunity is normally offered at the end of the semester.

For more information visit www.stephanienakasian.com.

 


Barbara Moore

Barbara Moore

Instructor, Piano & Organ

Email

Biography

B.A. in Music (piano and organ) from Mary Washington College, M.M. in Performance (organ) from Baylor University, with additional studies at the University of Kansas and the Summer Organ Institute in Zwolle, The Netherlands.  Currently, she teaches piano and organ, serves as organist at University Baptist Church, and performs concerts on organ and as accompanist for soloists and various choral groups, which have included the Oratorio Society, the Virginia Glee Club and the Virginia Consort.  She is active in the Charlottesville Music Teachers Association, the American Guild of Organists and the Wednesday Music Club.


Karl Hagstrom Miller

Karl Hagstrom Miller

Associate Professor (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 205

434-982-2372
Email
John Mayhood

John Mayhood

Instructor, Piano

Email

Biography

Canadian pianist John Mayhood has performed as soloist and chamber musician throughout North America, as well as in Germany and Austria. He has frequently appeared on CBC and SRC radio as well as on various NPR affiliates, and his performances have been televised in both the USA and Canada. In constant demand as a collaborator, John has appeared with musicians from the Montreal and Toronto Symphonies, the New York Philharmonic, and the National Arts Centre Orchestra, among many others. Also a scholar, he has presented on subjects ranging from the philosophy of performance practice to neo-Riemannian theory at, among other places, the University of Chicago and the annual meeting of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Musiktheorie.

John's current projects include recording and producing editions of sonatas by Johann Peter Pixis and preparing a series of concerts to celebrate, in 2013, the 50th anniversary of the death of Paul Hindemith. Upcoming engagements will take him from Montreal to Phoenix in a variety of concerto, solo and chamber music settings, in works ranging from Beethoven's Choral Fantasy to Matthew Burtner's 2010 work for piano and electro-acoustics, "Iceprints".

John earned his Master of Music degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he studied with Ian Hobson. His other major teachers were Caio Pagano and Jean-Paul Sévilla. John has taught piano at the University of Illinois and philosophy at Brown University and the Rhode Island School of Design. He is currently a member of the piano faculty at the University of Virginia.

 


Fred Maus

Fred Maus

Associate Professor (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 202
Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays 12-1

434-924-6497
Email

Biography

Fred Everett Maus teaches music at the University of Virginia. He has written on music and narrative, gender and sexuality in relation to discourse about music, popular music, embodiment, music therapy, and other subjects. He was a founding member of the editorial board of the journal Women and Music and for several years its book review editor; he served as the first Chair of the Queer Resource Group of the Society for Music Theory. Recent essays include "Listening and Possessing" (forthcoming), "Sexuality, Trauma, and Dissociated Expression" (2015), "Berlin Postcards" (2015), "Classical Concert Music and Queer Listening" (2013), and "Narrative and Identity in Three Songs about AIDS" (2013). He is co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Music and Queerness (forthcoming).


Noel Lobley

Assistant Professor (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Wilson 109
Office Hours: Mondays, 2:30pm-4:30pm

434-297-6987
Email

Biography

Noel Lobley is an ethnomusicologist, sound curator and artist who works across the disciplines of music, anthropology sound art and composition to develop a series of experiential sound events and international curatorial residencies. Through extensive fieldwork in sub-Saharan Africa, much of his creative practice takes ethnographic sound and music recordings out of archives for circulation back among communities. He has collaborated with musicians, sound artists, DJs, choreographers and composers in South Africa, the UK and throughout Europe and the US to develop creative and ethical ways for recordings to be experienced in spaces ranging from art galleries, festivals and museums, to schools, rainforests and township street corners.

Noel previously worked as a sound curator at the Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford, lecturing in both music and anthropology, and where he continues to serve as a Research Associate. He also has twenty years experience working as a DJ and in radio and the music industry. Noel has served on the committee of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology, is an appointed member of the Royal Anthropological Institute's ethnomusicology committee, and was awarded the 2015 Curl Lectureship at the Royal Anthropological Institute.

Noel is curating an ongoing series of touring sound installation and remix projects designed to link major ethnographic collections from across sub-Saharan Africa, developing projects with local artists, communities and institutions, in order to implement collaborative and sustainable methods to curate the possible histories and futures of sonic heritage. He is currently working on Curating Sound, a monograph that explores practical contemporary sound curation.


Nathaniel Lee

Nathaniel Lee

Lecturer, Trombone

Email

Biography

Nathaniel Lee is the Lecturer of Trombone at the University of Virginia and serves as Principal Trombone of the Charlottesville & University Symphony Orchestra. 

In addition to his duties at UVa and the Charlottesville Symphony, Nathaniel is a founding member of the American Trombone Quartet. ATQ actively performs and host clinics at universities and conferences across the country. In 2017 ATQ has performed recitals at the Big 12 Conference, TX; Western Carolina University, NC; and at International Trombone Festival in Redlands, CA. Locally Nathaniel continues to maintains an active freelance career having performed with the Richmond Symphony, Staunton Music Festival, Castleton Music Festival, Ash Lawn Opera, Virginia Oratorio Society and the Virginia Sinfonietta.

Before his appointment at the University of Virginia, Nathaniel was pursuing a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Trombone Performance and Brass Pedagogy at the University of Iowa, where he was awarded the 2013 Downbeat Magazine Award for Outstanding Graduate Soloist. During his studies at the New England Conservatory, Nathaniel was selected by Lorin Maazel to perform as trombonist in the Castleton Music Festival. As part of the Castleton Orchestra, Nathaniel performed in the Royal Opera House in Muscat, Oman and in the Virginia and D.C. area.

Nathaniel earned his Master of Music degree in Trombone Performance from New England Conservatory and a Bachelor of Music Performance degree from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Nathaniel Lee is an Edwards artist and performs on Edwards trombones.

www.AmericanTromboneQuartet.com

 


Andrew Koch

Andrew Koch

Assistant Professor

Hunter Smith Band Building (180 Culbreth Road)

434-982-5347
Email

Biography

At the University of Virginia, Drew Koch assists in the administration and rehearsal of the total band program, including the Cavalier Marching Band, Concert Band, Wind Ensemble and Men's and Women's Basketball Bands. Mr. Koch has been at UVA since 2005. A native of Southeastern Michigan, he received the Bachelor of Music degree in Music Education from Western Michigan University, Master of Music Education degree, with a trumpet performance emphasis, from the University of South Carolina; Doctor of Musical Arts in Performance, Literature and Pedagogy from James Madison University.

Mr. Koch was the Director of Bands at Chapin High School in South Carolina from 2001-2004. Under his direction, the Chapin Band earned consistent superior ratings at the SCBDA Concert Festival, regularly placed in the top 5 the State Marching Festival (finishing second in 2004) and was a State Honor Band every year under his direction. In 2005, the Chapin Band marched in the London New Year's Day Parade in England.

Mr. Koch is an active performer, clinician and adjudicator. He is a member of the Music Educators National Conference, the College Band Directors National Association, the ACC Band Directors Association, the National Band Association, and was inducted as an honorary member of Kappa Kappa Psi in 2001 and Tau Beta Sigma in 2009.

 


Michelle Kisliuk

Michelle Kisliuk

Associate Professor (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 201
Office Hours: Wednesday, 1-2pm

434-982-2946
Email
Michelle Kisliuk's Website

Biography

Michelle Kisliuk, Associate Professor, received the doctorate in Performance Studies from New York University in 1991. Integrating theory and practice, she specializes in a performance approach to ethnographic writing and research, and in an ethnographic and critical approach to performing. Since 1986 she has researched the music, dance, daily life, socioesthetics, and cultural politics of forest people (BaAka) in the Central African Republic (http://www.afropop.org/6333/seize-the-dance-the-baaka-of-central-africa/), and has also written about urban music/dance and modernity in Bangui (the capital city). In addition, her work extends to the socioesthetics of jam sessions at bluegrass festivals in the United States. Her published essays have appeared in collections including Shadows in the Field (Oxford University Press), Teaching Performance Studies (University of Southern Illinois Press), Performing Ethnomusicology (University of California Press) and Music and Gender (University of Illinois Press). Her book, Seize the Dance! BaAka Musical Life and the Ethnography of Performance (Oxford University Press) won the ASCAP Deems Taylor Special Recognition Award. She has been a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow and a Laura Boulton Senior Fellow in Ethnomusicology. Her current research/writing project is a collection of theoretical essays and case studies that address the ongoing project of performance ethnography, focusing in particular on her recent research with the House of Israel community in Western Ghana. Along with her academic teaching in Music in Everyday Life and Field Research and Ethnography of Performance, she directs the UVA African Music and Dance Ensemble.


Robert Jospe

Robert Jospé

Instructor, Percussion

Email
Robert Jospé's Website

Biography

 Born in Manhattan, Robert Jospé was inspired by his Belgian parents love of music and began playing the drums at fourteen. He had his first professional performance in France at the age of sixteen. While attending the Cambridge School of Weston in Weston, Massachusetts, Jospé enrolled in the Berklee College of Music summer session and began formal training on drums. Upon graduating from the Cambridge School, Jospé moved to New York City to attend New York University. Over the next twelve years he became an active player in the New York jazz and rock scene as well as co-leader of the fusion band Cosmology. He studied with Tony Williams and Bob Moses and performed with Michael Brecker, Dave Liebman, John Schofield and John Abercrombie.
    Jospé released his first CD Inner Rhythm and formed his own group Inner Rhythm in 1990. Inner Rhythm has performed in theaters, concert halls, clubs, and at festivals, private functions and community outreach programs from New York to Honolulu. Since 1992 he has received an annual touring grant from the Virginia Commission for the Arts for the band and his educational, interactive, lecture/demonstration The World Beat Workshop. The program, which is presented to thousands of students every year, highlights the history and varied styles of African influenced dance music throughout the Americas. Robert has also received funding from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts for both Inner Rhythm and the World Beat Workshop for statewide concerts and educational programs.
    Jospé joined the University of Virginia’s music department’s faculty in 1989. Jospé teaches jazz drumming and a rhythmic fluency course “Learn to Groove”. He is a member of UVA’s faculty jazz ensemble, The Free Bridge Quintet. With the Free Bridge Quintet, Robert contributed to the online educational component of Jazz by UVA Professor Scott DeVeaux and jazz writer Gary Giddins.
    Random Chance Records released Heart Beat in 2006, Jospé’s fifth CD as leader and the second on the label. Hands On was released in 2004. “Hands On” and “Time to Play” reached number four on Jazz Week, the national radio play chart. “Time to Play” and “Blue Blaze” received four stars in Downbeat Magazine. In 2009 Inner Rhythm released an EP Inner Rhythm Now! Jospé’s own instructional drum set and hand drum book and DVD Learn to Groove was released in 2008 and is now available at www.drumbum.com.
    Throughout his career Jospé has played and recorded with many bands and in many musical styles including Tim Reynolds and TR3, (rock/reggae/fusion), John McCutcheon and SGGL, (folk rock), Robin and Linda Williams, (folk), Ouatro na Bossa and Beleza, (Brazilian), with the John D’earth Quartet, the Jeff Decker Quartet with pianist Hod O’Brien and Royce Campbell (straight ahead jazz) and with Heather Maxwell (soul and Afro-Pop). Along with public concerts Jospé and his band have also played many private events and house concerts including a performance with Tony Bennett in Germany in 2004.
    In 2009 MBSR instructor Maria Kluge in collaboration with Jospé created a pilot program, Rhythm and Resilience, designed to improve the well being of participants through Mindfulness and drumming and began leading classes at the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail. Rhythm and Resilience was offered monthly to the public as a free community program funded by the Kluge Foundation. In Oct. 2009 Jospé completed the Remo Health Rhythms Facilitators Training Workshop in Princeton, NJ. Jospé was awarded the Artist, Educator of the Year, by the Charlottesville Jazz Society in 2012.
    The Robert Jospé Express came together in 2012 when Butch Taylor, former keyboard player with the Dave Matthews band, returned from the West Coast, and they began playing gigs at Fellini’s in Charlottesville. A few months later bassist, Dane Alderson joined the band. In October 2014 a double CD of the band was released, “Classics” with the trio and “Doin’It Up” included guitarist, Brian Mesko. Robert continues to tour and perform throughout the Mid-Atlantic with both The Express and Inner Rhythm. In 2015 the Inner Rhythm Quartet performed at Bridgewater College. The Express Quartet played concerts at the National Sculpture Garden in Washington DC “Jazz In The Garden” series, Harrisonburg Summer Concerts, Jazz in the Park in Staunton, The Salem Jazz Festival, Cape Charles Music Series, and the Artsplosure Festival in Raleigh, North Carolina. 
    In 2016 Robert’s Inner Rhythm Sextet presented “Miles Davis and the Birth of Fusion” at the Forbes Center for the Performing Arts in Harrisonburg, VA. At Longwood University Robert gave a master class and his Inner Rhythm Quartet performed a concert and participated in a panel discussion on “Democracy And Jazz” . His Inner Rhythm Quartet also presented the “History Of Jazz” at Harrisonburg High School. In 2016 Robert’s Express Quartet conducted workshops and concerts at Lynchburg College, Randolph Macon University, Virginia Wesleyan College and the Williamsburg Regional Library. During the 2016-2017 school year Robert presented his World Beat Workshop assembly program on the influence of African rhythms in the Americas in over 30 public schools throughout Virginia.
    In 2017 Robert and his Express Quartet will be performing for the Wintergreen Performing Art Series, the Twin Hickory Library Series in Henrico, the Salem Jazz Festival, Bluemont Concerts in Warrenton, the Cape Charles Summer Music Series, and the Duck, NC Jazz Festival in Oct. All of the Express Quartet, Inner Rhythm, and World Beat Workshop performances (except for the Duck, NC Jazz Fest) have received funding from the Virginia Commission For The Arts. Every year since 1992 Robert has been awarded a Touring Artist grant from the VCA. His World Beat Workshop programs have also received funding from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Roanoke Symphony Orchestra and  Bluemont Concerts. At UVA Robert continues to teach his very popular “Learn To Groove” MUSI 2340 course as well as a full schedule of private drum lessons and performances with the Free Bridge Quintet.
    As a side man Robert performed concerts with Stanley Jordan at NC Sate University in Durham NC and with Hungarian born jazz and classical pianist Daniel Zabor sponsored by the Charlottesville Jazz Society and the Hungarian Embassy. Robert recorded CD’s for folk and Grammy nominated artist John McCutcheon and saxophonist  Bobby Read. Jospé has been featured in the PBS TV Series "Charlottesville Inside Out," Jazz Times MagazineModern Drummer MagazineUVAMagazine.org, and The Savvy Musician.

 


Anastasia Jellison

Instructor, Harp

Email

Biography

Anastasia Jellison holds a Bachelor of Music Degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music, where she studied with Alice Chalifoux, Principal Harp of the Cleveland Orchestra for 47 years. In 1999 she completed her Master of Music Degree in Harp Performance at the Shepherd School of Music, Rice University, under the instruction of Paula Page, Principal Harpist of the Houston Symphony.

Miss Jellison has extensive experience as an orchestral harpist. She has played with the Houston Symphony, the Houston Ballet, the Houston Grand Opera, the Knoxville Symphony, Richmond Symphony, Virginia Symphony, Opera Roanoke, and several other ensembles throughout Texas, Ohio, and Virginia. She has toured Europe with the North Carolina School of the Arts, attended the International Festival-Institute at Round Top in Round Top, TX, and has traveled to Japan with the Pacific Music Festival. She debuted with the Roanoke Symphony for the 50th Anniversary Concert in a performance of the Bartok Concerto for Orchestra. She was named Principal Harp of the RSO in 2005. During her summers, Miss Jellison performs with the Shendandoah Valley Bach Festival and the Wintergreen Summer Music Festival. 

Anastasia currently teaches at the University of Richmond, University of Virginia, and the College of William and Mary. Miss Jellison also instructs a small private studio in Richmond, VA. 

 


Greg Howard

Greg Howard

Instructor, Chapman Stick

Email

Biography

Musician and composer Greg Howard is one of the world's most active Chapman Stick players, having released nine CDs and performing all over North America, Europe and Japan. His music blends a wide variety of influences from Jazz, Latin and Flemenco to Progressive Rock, with heavy doses of free and structured improvisation. He has given over 2000 performances on this unusual instrument since 1985, including Lincoln Center's 2000 Electronic Evolutions concert, the 2003 and 2005 Montreal Jazz Festivals, the 2005 Festival of Stick and Tap Guitar in Allaire, France, and as a guest artist with the U. Va. Jazz Ensemble.

The Chapman Stick is an electric stringed instrument that combines bass, melody and chords all at once. American jazz guitarist Emmett Chapman invented this instrument to embody his unique Free Hands two-handed tapping guitar method, which he discovered in 1969. Howard has taught hundreds of Stick students at seminars, and he has written a comprehensive method book for the instrument ("The Stick Book", published by Stick Enterprises in Los Angeles).

 


Kelly Gross

Instructor, Piano

Email

Biography

Kelly Gross has been a member of the piano faculty at the University of Virginia since 2006. She is a graduate of the Critical and Comparative Studies in Music (UVA) program (M.A.), and is a published scholar in the fields of ethnomusicology and music and film.  Her teachers have included David Griswold (University of Redlands, CA), James Barnes (Hampton University, VA) and Mimi Tung (UVA).  She has been a featured soloist with the Northwest Florida Symphony Orchestra. Her performance interests include cello, chamber music, 20th century repertoire and Ghanaian drumming and dance.  She is a founding member of the University’s Jewish Concert Series.  

Her current research interests include a focus on gender, embodiment and vocality in music.  Her publications include: Michelle Kisliuk and Kelly Gross, "What's the 'It' That We Learn to Perform?: Teaching BaAka Music and Dance," in Performing Ethnomusicology: Teaching and Representation in World Music Ensembles, ed. Ted Solis (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004) and Kelly Gross, "Female Subjectivity, Disability and Musical Authorship in Krzysztof Kieslowski's Blue," in Sounding Off: Theorizing Disability in Music, eds. Neil Lerner and Joseph Straus (New York: Routledge Press, 2006).

She currently enjoys a thriving private studio and serves as an active member of CMTA.

 


Bonnie Gordon

Bonnie Gordon

Associate Professor (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 203

434-924-6495
Email

Biography

Bonnie Gordon's primary research interests center on the experiences of sound in Early Modern music making and the affective potential of the human voice.  She works on curricular and co-curricular civic engagement programs that engage social injustice through the arts.  Dr. Gordon is currently working on two book projects. Voice Machines: The Castrato, The Cat Piano and Other Strange Sounds uses the castrato as a point of departure for asking several questions about the interrelated histories of music, technology, sound, and the limits of the human body. It positions castrati as sonic figures who tell a story about music, sound and technology before electricity. Jefferson’s Ear closely explores the historical record, especially what is and is not in his music collection. The book focuses on sound, music, and race in two locations; Monticello and New Orleans. The silences in the written record resound with the racial fear and exclusion that were as much a part of the American Revolution as inalienable rights, and that musical aesthetics mattered deeply in the emergence of race as a political and social category.Her first book, Monteverdi's Unruly Women (Cambridge University Press, 2004) frames the composer's madrigals and music dramas written between 1600 and 1640 as windows into contemporary notions of sound, body, voice, and sense. She has explored similar issues in articles about contemporary singer-songwriters Kate Bush and Tori Amos. She co-edited an interdisciplinary and cross cultural volume of essays about courtesans entitled The Courtesans Arts, (Oxford University Press, 2006).  She has also published on the Soundscapes of early America. Dr. Gordon is the recipient of two grants from the Folger Shakespeare Library, a dissertation grant from the American Association of University Women, a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at Brandeis University, a Bunting Fellowship at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship. She has also been the Robert Lehman Visiting Professor at Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies. Dr. Gordon also plays rock, jazz, and classical viola and has published in the Washington Post and Slate.

 


 


I-Jen Fang

I-Jen Fang

Associate Professor

Email

Biography

Described as an “intrepid percussionist” by Fanfare Magazine,I-Jen Fang has a career as a solo performer, chamber musician, orchestral player, and teacher.  She joined the faculty of the McIntire Department of Music at the University of Virginia in 2005 and as Principal Timpanist and Percussionist of the Charlottesville Symphony.

As a soloist, I-Jen has performed as a marimba soloist in Taiwan, U.S., Austria, France, Hungary, Romania, and South Africa.  She was also the featured marimba soloist with the Charlottesville Symphony in 2006 and 2010. As a chamber musician, I-Jen has performed or recorded with artists such as Keiko Abe, William Cahn, Christopher Deane, Mark Ford, Heini Kärkkäinen, Mike Mainieri, Jan Müller-Szeraws, Diane Pascal, Carsten Schmidt, Ed Smith, Michael Spiro, NanikWenton, Nyoman Wenton, Attacca Percussion Group, and DaCapo Chamber Players.  She has appeared in Heritage Theater Festival, Staunton Music Festival, University of Virginia Chamber Music Series, Percussive Arts Society International Convention and Regional PAS Day of Percussion.  

An advocate of New Music, I-Jen is currently the director of the UVA New Music Ensemble.  The ensemble has recently collaborated with composer/improviser George Lewis, and performed for composers such as Phillip Glass and Christian Wolff.  She has also commissioned and/or premiered works by Matthew Burtner, Ted Coffey, Kevin Davis, Christopher Deane, Erik DeLuca, Aurie Hsu, Sarah O’Halloran, Chris Peck, Judith Shatin, Brian Simalchik, Ed Smith, and D.J. Sparr.  

Born in Taipei, Taiwan, I-Jen began her musical education at age six taking piano. Taking up percussion at the age of nine, she came to the United States at age fifteen to pursue her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Percussion Performance at Carnegie Mellon University.  She received her Master of Music degree from Northwestern University and her Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the University of North Texas where she served as a teaching fellow.

I-Jen is an Innovative Percussion artist.

 


Scott DeVeaux

Scott DeVeaux

Professor (Critical & Comparative Studies),

Old Cabell 208
Office Hours: Mondays, 12:00-1:00pm Wednesdays, 11:00-12:00pm or by appointment

434-924-6500
Email

Biography

His most recent book, Jazz (with critic Gary Giddins; Norton, 2009), published both as a textbook and as a trade book, has been nominated for the 2010 Jazz Journalists Association Jazz Award for Best Book about Jazz.  He has also written The Birth of Bebop: A Social and Musical History (University of California, 1997, Macmillan U.K. 1999), which has won the American Musicological Society’s Kinkeldey Award for best book, The American Book Award, and an ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award; Jazz in America: Who's Listening? (1995), an interpretation of a massive survey by the NEH; and The Music of James Scott (with William H. Kenney, Smithsonian 1992).

Among his articles are “This is What I Do” (in Art From Start to Finish, edited Howard Becker, U Chicago, 2006); “Multiphrenia: A New Approach to Charlie Parker”: Musica Oggi (Milan, 2005-2006); "Struggling with 'Jazz," (Current Musicology, 2001-2002); "'Nice Work if You Can Get It': Thelonious Monk and Popular Song" (Black Music Research Journal 1999, The Thelonious Monk Reader, 2001); "What Did We Do to Be So Black and Blue?"(Musical Quarterly 1996); "Black, Brown and Beige and the Critics" (Black Music Research Journal, 1993); "Constructing the Jazz Tradition," which won the Irving Lowens Award in 1992 (Black American Literature Forum 1991, reprinted in The Jazz Cadence of American Culture, Columbia, 1998); "The Emergence of the Jazz Concert, 1935-1945" (American Music 1989); "Bebop and the Recording Industry" (Journal of the American Musicological Society 1988).

He is Series Editor of the Oxford Readers on American Musicians, and has recently served as a Fulbright Distinguished Chair (Odense University, Denmark 2001-2002).

 


Jeff Decker

Jeff Decker

Instructor, Saxophone (Jazz & Classical)

Old Cabell 215

434-924-6501
Email

Biography

Jeff Decker received his bachelor's degree in Music Education from the University of North Texas; Denton, Texas in 1987. He received a master's degree in United States History from the University of Virginia in 1991; his thesis was a study of race relations in the Jazz Community, 1933-1948. During his undergraduate studies, Mr. Decker was awarded a performance scholarship for classical saxophone from UNT, where he played for the wind ensemble and saxophone quartet. He has performed at UVA with the Charlottesville Symphony. Over the past decade, Mr. Decker has played and recorded with the University's own faculty jazz group, the Free Bridge Quintet, as well as Inner Rhythm, John  D'earth, Blue Indigo, Greg Howard, etc. He has also performed and/or recorded with jazz artists Michael Brecker, Charlie Haden, Pat Metheny, and others.


Nomi Dave

Nomi Dave

Assistant Professor (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Randall 126
Office Hours: Tuesday/Thursday, 1-3pm

434-982-2396
Email

Biography

Nomi Dave is an ethnomusicologist who researches the role of music, politics, emotion and violence in public life. Her work focuses on the Republic of Guinea, with broader interests in francophone West Africa. Her book, The Revolution’s Echoes: Music, Politics, and Pleasure in Guinea (forthcoming 2019, University of Chicago Press), examines the aesthetics and legacies of authoritarianism in Guinea.

Nomi’s current research project explores the role of the voice in response to sexual violence in Guinea. This work examines vocal responses to sexual violence in contexts ranging from music and talk radio to street protests and legal mechanisms. Working in collaboration with local activists, the project aims to highlight the ways in which survivors’ voices are silenced, and to draw attention to new vocal practices by women’s rights advocates in Guinea today.

 Nomi earned her PhD from Oxford University and previously taught at Duke University, in the departments of Music and Cultural Anthropology. Prior to becoming an ethnomusicologist, she worked in the fields of human rights, immigration law and humanitarian relief in West Africa and the U.S.

 


Luke Kahl

Luke Dahl

Assistant Professor (Composition & Computer Technologies) | Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering by courtesy appointment

Wilson 110

434-297-6986
Email

Biography

Luke Dahl is Assistant Professor of Composition and Computer Technologies at University of Virginia where he teaches classes on music technology, audio signal processing, and music interaction design. Luke earned his PhD in Computer-Based Music Theory and Acoustics from the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University, and a bachelor’s in Electrical Engineering at the University of Michigan. His research interests include music-related movement, new interfaces for musical expression, and music signal processing.

At CCRMA Luke was a founding member of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra (Slork) and the Stanford Mobile Phone Orchestra (MoPho). His musical works include SoundBounce for mobile phone orchestra, which was performed at NIME in Sydney, and TweetDreams for audience interaction and live Twitter data, which was premiered at the MiTo Settembre Musica Festival in Milan and has been performed in Oslo, San Francisco, and at TEDx Silicon Valley. He also produces and performs electronic dance music and ambient music.

Before returning to academia Luke worked at the Joint E-mu/Creative Advanced Technology Center where he developed reverb algorithms for the SoundBlasterLive sound card products and co-authored five patents on audio signal processing, and at Apple where he worked on audio for iPod and laptop products.


John D'earth

Lecturer, Director of Jazz Performance

Email
John D'earth's Website

Biography

John D'earth is the Director of Jazz Performance at the University of Virginia  where he teaches improvisation, jazz trumpet, jazz composition, and directs the UVA Jazz Ensemble.

Jazz trumpeter and composer John D'earth was born in Framingham, Massachusetts in 1950. He studied, as a teenager, with saxophonist Boots Mussulli, (Stan Kenton, Charlie Ventura, Teddy Wilson) with John Coffey, (principal trombonist in the Boston Symphony) and arranging with Thad Jones. He attended Harvard University and, later, moved to New York City where he studied with Carmine Caruso, Vince Penzarella and Richie Beirach.

D'earth has performed and recorded internationally and appeared on over one hundred recordings spanning the analog and digital eras on vinyl, CDs, film, and video. Working with Buddy Rich, Lionel Hampton, Gunter Hampel’s Galaxie Dream Band, Miles Davis/Quincy Jones at Montreaux, Tito Puente, Bruce Hornsby, Emily Remler, Bennie Wallace, Eddie Gomez, The George Gruntz Concert Jazz Band, Bob Moses, Pat Metheny, Joe Henderson, Clark Terry, John Scofield and John Abercrombie, among many others, has called upon his ability to feel at home, creatively, in many genres.  

D'earth has recorded as a leader for Vanguard Records, ENJA Records, DoubleTime Jazz and his own Cosmology label.  His recordings reveal an eclectic, searching nature, rooted in the entirety of the jazz and blues tradition and a hard bop trumpet sensibility that owes as much to Louis Armstrong as to Miles Davis.

D’earth is an avid composer and arranger with hundreds of compositions to his credit including full-length works for orchestra and/or other large ensembles.  He has written music for the Kronos String Quartet, the Kandinsky Trio, Bruce Hornsby, the Dave Matthews Band, the San Diego, Atlanta, Richmond and Roanoke Symphony Orchestras, the Charlottesville Chamber Festival, the University of Virginia Jazz Ensemble, the Great American Music Ensemble and the Charlottesville-Albemarle Youth Orchestra.

Relocating from Manhattan to Charlottesville in the mid-eighties, D’earth is a co-founder of the Free Bridge Quintet, was the music director for Cosmology (which became the Thompson D'earth Band) with his wife, vocalist/songwriter Dawn Thompson, leads the Charlottesville Swing Orchestra, the one blood jazz/poetry project, Thursday Night at Miller’s, and his own quartet/quintet.

As an educator D’earth has become interested in early musical development and in playing freely improvised music with young and even brand-new musicians in his “Precognitive Conservatory Orchestra” jam sessions and workshops.  As a jazz musician and composer he is interested in the nexus of composition and improvisation and in working with musicians, from any genre, who are committed to pushing their own boundaries in both of these areas.

John D'earth's career in music is documented in the Biographical Encyclopedia of Jazz, (Oxford Press) by Leonard Feather and Ira Gitler.

 


Ted Coffey

Ted Coffey

Associate Professor (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Old Cabell 204
Office Hours: Wednesday, 11am-1pm

434-924-6496
Email

Biography

Ted Coffey makes acoustic and electronic chamber music, interactive installations, and songs. His work has been presented in concerts and festivals across North America, Europe and Asia, at such venues as Judson Church, The Knitting Factory, Roulette, Symphony Space, and Lincoln Center (NYC), The Lab, New Langton Arts, Zellerbach Hall, and The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (SF), Wolf Trap and The Kennedy Center (DC), the Korean National University of the Arts (Seoul), The Carre Theatre (Amsterdam), and ZKM (Karlsruhe, Germany). His writings on aesthetics and politics in the performing arts have been honored with significant awards from the Josephine De Kármán and Andrew C. Mellon Foundations. Coffey studied composition with Jon Appleton, Christian Wolff, Pauline Oliveros, and Paul Lansky, among others, receiving degrees in music from Dartmouth (AB), Mills College (MFA) and Princeton (MFA, PhD). Recordings of his work are available on the Ellipsis Arts, Everglade, Innova, Audition Records, SEAMUS, crackletimesfavor, and EcoSono labels. Coffey is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia, where he teaches courses in composition, music technologies, music aesthetics, and pop.


Adam Carter

Adam Carter

Associate Professor

Old Cabell 212

434-924-6881
Email

Biography

Cellist Adam Carter maintains an active career as a recitalist, chamber and orchestral musician, and teacher.  Recent engagements include recitals and chamber music performances at UNC-Chapel Hill, Wake Forest University, the University of Virginia, Randolph College, Bridgewater College and Hampden-Sydney College.

Dr. Carter is currently the principal cellist of the Charlottesville Symphony and has performed with the Richmond Symphony, Madison Symphony, Winston-Salem Symphony, Erie Philharmonic and Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra.

A top prizewinner at the 1998 Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition, Dr. Carter continues to enjoy a rich and diverse career playing chamber music.  He currently performs with the Rivanna String Quartet, Artemis Duo and the Virginia Sinfonietta.  A founding member of the Tarab Cello Ensemble, Dr. Carter traveled the country playing new works for cello octet. The ensemble’s accolades include grants from the Howard Hanson Institute for American Music for its accomplishments in the performance and creation of contemporary American music, the Foreman Institute for the Creative and Performing Arts and the Fromm Foundation. The Ensemble has recorded on Bridge Records and Albany Records.

As a teacher, Dr. Carter is on the faculty at the University of Virginia as Lecturer in Cello.  Prior to his appointment at U.Va, he was adjunct professor of cello and bass at Ripon College in Wisconsin.  Dr. Carter grew up in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and attended high school at the North Carolina School of the Arts. He received his Bachelors degree and Masters degree with distinction from the Eastman School of Music, and completed his Doctoral degree at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His principal teachers include Steven Doane, Rosemary Elliot, Robert Marsh and Uri Vardi. 

 


Peter D'Elia

Peter D'Elia

Instructor, Piano

Email

Biography

Peter D’Elia is a graduate of the McIntire Department of Music's Ph.D. program in Critical and Comparative Studies. He is originally from Chatham, Massachusetts and studied music and history at Harvard College. He completed his M.A. in music at Tufts University, where he wrote a thesis on pedagogical influences in the music of Muzio Clementi. An active pianist, Peter also teaches piano at the University of Virginia. In his spare time, Peter enjoys cooking, watching and playing hockey, and cooking while watching hockey.


Pamela Beasley

Instuctor, Voice

Email

Biography

Pamela Blevins Beasley, soprano, has sung many leading and supporting operatic and musical theater roles with Fort Worth Opera, Birmingham Civic Opera, Pensacola Opera, Mobile Opera, Southern Regional Opera, Maxwell Theater Troupe, Southwestern Opera Theater and University of Montevallo Lyric Theater. Highlight roles include: Mimi La Boheme, Zerlina Don Giovanni, Mother Amahl and the Night Visitors,  Marian The Music Man, both Julie and Carrie in performances of Carousel, Yum-Yum The Mikado, Jenny Down in the Valley, and Mary Little Mary Sunshine.   She has appeared as featured soprano soloist at Carnegie Hall and as a recitalist in Rome, Italy.  Her performance experience has also included an active oratorio and sacred concert engagement schedule in Virginia, Alabama, Mississippi, Texas and New York. Oratorio repertoire performed includes: Messiah – Handel; Gloria – Vivaldi and Poulenc; Magnificat – J. S. Bach and Rutter; Requiem – Faure, Rutter and Mozart; Mass in C – Mozart and Beethoven; Missa Brevis – Haydn; Britten’s Festival te Deum, Rejoice in the Lamb and Ceremony of Carols; and Mendelssohn’s Elijah, St. Paul and Hymn of Praise. She has appeared locally with the Virginia Consort, the Oratorio Society, the Charlottesville Symphony, the University of Virginia Chamber Music Series, and with the Crozet Community Orchestra.   She has also been an active recitalist in various venues including the universities where she has taught and locally with the Wednesday Music Club and Charlottesville Music Teachers Association.  

Teaching has been an integral part of Pamela’s musical career.  Her students have been winners at State and Regional National Association of Teachers of Singing events and have competed at the National level NATS auditions. Her students have also included winners at district Metropolitan Opera auditions.  Many have pursued graduate performance degrees at some of the finest music schools in the country and are now performing professionally in the U.S. as well as internationally.  She has served on the faculties James Madison University School of Music; Mary Baldwin University Department of Fine Arts; Liberty University School of Music; University of Mobile School of Music; University of South Alabama Department of Music; and Auburn University at Montgomery Department of Music. She has also served on the faculty of Operafestival di Roma, Rome, Italy. In addition to applied voice, she has taught solo vocal literature, vocal pedagogy, vocal diction, and has directed opera workshops and choral ensembles. Pamela has taught at UVA since 2004 as a member of the Performance Faculty.  She currently serves as the Liaison to the Chair for Voice, teaches private applied voice, the Vocal Skills Class, and co-directs the ensemble, Voice for the Stage.

Professional activities include a long-term membership in the NATS organization, having served as both Governor for the Alabama Chapter and as a Board Member for the Virginia Chapter.  She is also in frequent demand leading Vocal Master Classes and as an adjudicator/clinician for both vocal and choral competitions, workshops and festivals.

Beasley holds degrees from Southwestern Seminary and the University of Montevallo where she was a member of Phi Kappa Phi and Pi Kappa Lambda honorary societies. Additional studies were completed at Boston Conservatory and Shenandoah Conservatory.  She studied voice with Benjamin Middaugh, Lynda Poston-Smith, and appeared in Master Classes with Bruce Lunkley and Helmuth Rilling.  She studied vocal pedagogy with James McKinney, Robert Burton, Jeanette Lovetri and Rebecca Folsom.   She has received numerous awards and was selected for Outstanding Women of America, 1981, and Who’s Who in America, 2007.

 


Ayn Balija

Associate Professor

Email

Biography

Violist Ayn Balija leads a musically rich life performing and teaching throughout the country.

She is currently the Associate Professor of Viola at the University of Virginia, Principal Violist of the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia, and violist of the Rivanna String Quartet. She has also been on faculty at James Madison University and Lorain County Community College. She presents masterclasses throughout the south-central region of the country. During the summer she is on faculty at the Tennessee Governor’s School for the Arts.

As an orchestral musician Ms. Balija has performed in such venues as Heinz Hall and Carnegie Hall with the Pittsburgh Symphony as well as performs with the Richmond Symphony, Williamsburg Symphonia, Charlottesville Opera, Victory Hall Opera, and the Roanoke Symphony. For twelve years she was also a tenured member of ProMusica Chamber Orchestra of Columbus helping to promote new music for chamber orchestra through commissions and recordings of new works under the Summit label. Ms. Balija has performed additional chamber works at Yachats Summer Music Festival (OR), North Carolina Chamber Music Festival (NC), and the Staunton Music Festival (VA).

As a soloist, Ms. Balija has performed recitals in New Zealand, Oregon, North Carolina, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Virginia focusing on promoting the versatility of the viola. She has also been invited to solo with the Tennessee Governor’s School for the Arts Orchestra and the Charlottesville Symphony.

A devoted pedagogue, Ms. Balija strives to promote a diverse learning experience. In 2014, Ms. Balija created Violapalooza, an annual, all-viola day, featuring viola ensembles, workshops, guest viola artists teaching and preforming for the education and enjoyment of violists of all ages.  Guests have included top violists Kim Kashkashian, Roger Tapping, Paul Neubauer, and George Taylor. In addition to maintaining a private studio, she teaches in the Charlottesville City and Albemarle County school districts through the Boyd Tinsley Foundation and the Symphony’s Preludes program coaching and mentoring young musicians.

Ms. Balija has also presented at the American String Teachers Association and been published on the American Viola Society’s Teacher’s Toolbox page. In 2017 she presented a lecture at the 44th International Viola Congress in Wellington, NZ.

Ayn Balija holds a Bachelor of Music from the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, Masters of Music from The Cleveland Institute of Music and Doctorate of Musical Arts from James Madison University. Her principal mentors have been Peter Slowik, Jeffrey Irvine, and Karen Tuttle.

When not performing, Ms. Balija enjoys spending time in nature and baking for all her colleagues in the orchestra.

 


Katy Ambrose

Assistant Professor

Email
Katy Ambrose's Website

Biography

Praised by the Philadelphia Inquirer as a “spectacular” and “graceful” musician, Katy Ambrose has made a name for herself as an educator, chamber and orchestral musician. She joined the faculty of the University of Virginia as Lecturer in Horn and Principal Horn of the Charlottesville Symphony in the Fall of 2015, and also holds the position of Fourth Horn of the Delaware Symphony Orchestra. Previously, Katy was a founding member and horn player in Seraph Brass, Second Horn in the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic, Fourth Horn in the Philly Pops!, Acting Assistant Principal/Utility horn in the Albany Symphony, and Assistant Principal horn in the Lexington Philharmonic (Lexington, KY). She has performed with the Philadelphia Orchestra, Opera Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Ballet, Hawai’i Opera Theater/Hawai’i Symphony Orchestra, Chamber Music Honolulu, Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, Harrisburg Symphony, Vermont Symphony, New Haven Symphony, and regionally with Opera on the James, Ash Lawn Opera, and the Staunton Music Festival. Outside of the classical setting, Katy played in the band for several shows on Adele’s 2016 world tour, Cee Lo Green’s Grammy-winning album, The Lady Killers, and has been heard during the Super Bowl and Monday Night Football as a recording artist for NFL Studios.

Ambrose has previously served on the faculty for the Curtis Institute of Music Young Artists’ Summer Program, Drexel University, Settlement Music School, Interlochen Arts Camp, and taught undergraduate horn students at Yale University. Katy is especially interested in mentoring younger musicians and has taught for and developed programs and curricula for several education programs including the Philadelphia Orchestra School Partnership Program, Delaware Symphony school program and the “El-Sistema” inspired programs Tune-Up, Philly and Play On, Philly!

Katy earned an Artist Diploma from Yale University, her Masters degree from the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan, and is finishing her doctorate at Temple University in 2018. She was the recipient of the prestigious William D. Revelli Award from the University of Michigan School of Music and the Henry and Lucy Moses Fellowship from the Yale School of Music.

More about Katy Ambrose at http://www.katyambrose.com/


Matthew Burtner

Professor (Composition & Computer Technologies), Department Chair

Old Cabell 114B (Chair's Office)
Office Hours: Tuesday 3:30-5pm
Email
Matthew Burtner's Website

Biography

Matthew Burtner is an Alaskan-born composer and sound artist specializing in concert music, environmental sound art and interactive media. His work explores ecology, embodiment, and extended polymetric and noise-based systems. He composes systems of human-computer-environment interaction, finding an aesthetic between human expression and environmental system. Burtner currently splits his time between Alaska and Virginia where he is Professor of Composition and Computer Technologies (CCT) in the Department of Music at the University of Virginia. He is founder of the environmental arts non-profit organization, EcoSono (http://www.ecosono.org).

            First Prize Winner of the Musica Nova International Electroacoustic Music Competition (Czech Republic), an NEA Art Works Grant Winner, an IDEA Award Winner, and a recipient of the Howard Brown Foundation Fellowship, Burtner has also received honors and awards from Bourges (France), Gaudeamus (Netherlands), Darmstadt (Germany) and The Russolo (Italy) international competitions. His music has been performed in major festivals and venues throughout the world, and commissioned by ensembles such as Integrales (Germany), NOISE (USA), Trio Ascolto (Germany), Peak FreQuency (USA), MiN (Norway), Musikene (Spain), Spiza (Greece), CrossSound (Alaska), and others.

            Burtner studied composition, computer music and philosophy at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, Iannis Xenakis’ UPIC Center in Paris, Tulane University in New Orleans and St. Johns College in Santa Fe. He received a Doctorate of Musical Arts from Stanford University where he worked closely with Jonathan Harvey, Max Mathews and Brian Ferneyhough. He has also conducted major professional residencies at UWM's Center for 21st Century Studies (USA), Banff Centre for the Arts (Canada), Pompeu Fabra Universidad (Spain), Musikene (Spain), Cite des Arts (France), IRCAM/Centre Pompidou (France), and The University of Missouri Kansas City (USA).

            Among published recordings for Summit (US), DACO (Germany), The WIRE (UK), MIT Press (US), Innova (US), ICMA (US), Centaur (US), EcoSono (US) and Euridice (Norway), Burtner has released six solo albums including the recently published “Auksalaq” (EcoSono), “That which is bodiless is reflected in bodies” (Centaur), and “NOISE plays BURTNER” (Innova). Jean Ferraca of Public Radio’s “Here on Earth’ says “It is music that draws from both beauty and horror of nature... He calls his music “ecoacoustics”. I say it’s the world song.” 


Graduate Students

Hannah Young

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 214
Email

Emily Mellen

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 212
Email

Biography

Emily joined the PhD program in Critical and Comparative Studies (CCS) in Fall 2017. Her research interests include music and sound in the Arab world, music & politics, music & altered states of consciousness, ethnography, timbre, voice studies, women in music, and global pop.

Emily received a B.A. (summa cum laude with college and departmental honors) in Music History with a minor in Arabic and Islamic Studies from UCLA in 2016. Her B.A. thesis, entitled Voicing Arab Nationalism: Interpreting Singers Fairuz and Umm Kulthum, was awarded the Friends of MusicologyBest Undergraduate Senior Thesis” prize. While at UCLA, she served on the School of Music student council and the LA Opera college advisory committee and played in the Near East, Balkan, and Balinese ensembles.

In her free time, Emily enjoys singing, hiking, reading fiction, practicing yoga, travelling, and playing with her son.


Heather Mease

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Old Cabell 213
Email

Biography

Heather Mease is a multimedia artist, composer, and community arts organizer from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Her work combines acoustic and electronic composition, film, painting, digital video art, and poetry with elements of absurdity, popular/digital culture, and religiosity in commentary on established sociopolitical, economic, and aesthetic norms. These projects are often collaborative and presented in a variety of settings that reflect the socially minded nature of the work. In addition to currently pursuing graduate studies in Composition and Computer Technologies at the University of Virginia, Mease manages operations at the Bridge Progressive Arts Initiative and the Charlottesville Mural Project in Charlottesville, VA.

www.hmmease.com


Samuel Golter

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 211
Email

Becky Brown

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Old Cabell 213
Email

Biography

Becky Brown is a composer, harpist, artist, and web designer, interested in producing intensely personal works across the multimedia spectrum. She focuses on narrative, emotional exposure, and catharsis, with a vested interest in using technology and the voice to deeply connect with an audience, wherever they are.

 

Brown has been the Technical Director of the Electroacoustic Barn Dance, and Assistant Technical Director for Third Practice and SPLICE Institute. Her music has been performed at SEAMUS, SCI National/Regional, Third Practice New Music Festival, Ball State New Music Festival, and in Beijing, China. Her music can be found on the New Focus Recordings and Royal Livermush labels. Brown has studied electroacoustic composition with Dr. Matthew Burtner and Dr. Mark Snyder, and harp performance with Dr. Grace Bauson.

 

For more information, visit www.becky-brown.org.


Rami Stucky

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 214
Email

Alex Christie

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Old Cabell 211
Email

Biography

Alex Christie makes acoustic music, electronic music, and intermedia art in many forms. His work has been called “vibrant," “interesting, I guess,” and responsible for “ruin[ing] my day”. He has collaborated with artists in a variety of fields and is particularly interested in the design of power structures, systems of interference, absurdist bureaucracy, and indeterminacy in composition. He is currently based in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Recently, Alex’s work has explored the ecology of performance in intermedia art and interactive electronic music. Through real-time audio processing, instrument building, light, video, and theater, Alex expands performance environments to offer multiple lenses through which the audience can experience the work. Alex has performed and presented at a variety of conferences and festivals whose acronyms combine to spell nicedinsaucesfeemmmmmogscabsplot.

Alex serves as faculty, Director of Electronic Music, Director of Composers Forums, and Academic Dean at the Walden School of Music Young Musicians Program. He holds degrees from the Oberlin Conservatory and Mills College and is currently pursuing a PhD in Composition and Computer Technologies (CCT) at the University of Virginia as a Jefferson Fellow. Other interests include baseball and geometric shapes.


Timothy Booth

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 213
Email

Biography

Tim Booth is a PhD student in the Critical and Comparative Studies program. His research interests include ecomusicology, environmental sound art, jazz history, the history of sound recording, and twentieth-century art music. Methodologically, Tim engages with several disciplinary conversations comprising historical musicology, ethnomusicology, music theory, sound studies, anthropology, and aesthetics. 

 

Prior to joining the CCS graduate program Tim completed a Bachelors of Music majoring in jazz performance and a Masters of Music at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. With his Honors research Tim studied the improvised interaction of pianist Bill Evans and bassist Scott LaFaro. His Master thesis addressed the early fusion jazz of Miles Davis, focusing on the interrelationship of the bandleader’s creative processes in the recording studio and on the concert stage. 

 

Tim performs regularly as a pianist with UVA jazz combos and with a jazz quintet in Charlottesville. You may also stumble across him on the Rivanna Trail, microphone in hand recording the sounds of local wildlife. 


Ben Robertson

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Old Cabell 214
Email

Biography

Ben Luca Robertson is a composer, experimental luthier, and co-founder of the independent record label, Aphonia Recordings.  His creative work addresses an interest in autonomous processes, landscape, and biological systems—often by supplanting narrative structure with an emphasis on the physicality of sound, spectra, and microtonality.  Growing up in the dry, expansive landscapes of the Inland Northwest (outskirts of Spokane, Washington), impressions of Ponderosa pine trees, channel scablands, basalt outcroppings, dust, vacant lots, and relics of boomtown decay continue to haunt his work.

Ben holds a M.A. in Music Composition from Eastern Washington University and a B.A. from the Evergreen State College.  In the Summer of 2015, he was appointed to a guest research position at the Tampere Unit for Computer-Human Interactions (TAUCHI) in Finland and recently collaborated with the University of Idaho Water Resources Department to sonify migratory patterns of salmon in the Pacific Northwest.  His music has been performed both regionally and abroad, including the Olympia Experimental Music Festival, Magma, International Noise Conference, and Sound & Music Computing Conference in Maynooth, Ireland.


Lydia Warren

Lydia Warren

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Email

Biography

Lydia Warren is a Critical and Comparative Studies PhD student interested in constructions and perceptions of race, gender, authenticity, and meaning in American vernacular music, as well as regional specificity and cultural tourism.

After a decade of international touring and recording as a blues musician, Lydia began pursuing her love of music within academia, starting at Middlesex Community College. In 2011 she earned the school-wide honors of both a Follett scholarship and the annual music department award for "Most Outstanding Performance."  Transferring to Smith College as an Ada Comstock scholar, she graduated in December 2013 with a B.A. in Music and received the Harriet Dey Barnum Prize for "Best All-Around Student of Music." In 2013 Lydia interned at Smithsonian Folkways Records in Washington, D.C. She is a 2015-2016 UVA Praxis Fellow.

 


Rachel Trapp

Rachel Rome

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Email
Rachel Trapp's Website

Biography

Rachel Rome is a composer, sound artist, and improvising hornist whose works for performance and installation crystallize in sound the habits of being: the daily patterns of ineffable exchange that bind our individual lives together.

Pieces by Rachel have been performed by artists such as Rhymes with Opera, Fred Frith, Laurel Jay Carpenter, and the Del Sol String Quartet and have been heard at places such as the National Opera Center (NY), the OPENSIGNAL Festival at Brown University (RI), Røst AIR (Norway), the Musical Singularity Series at Wesleyan University (CT), the International SuperCollider Symposium at the University of Colorado at Boulder (CO), the Music for People and Thingamajigs Festival (CA), and Art in Odd Places (NC). Her writings have been published in Emergency Index, -empyre-, and raiding the larder: a journal at the junction of art and food.

She earned a Master's degree in composition from Mills College in 2013 and a Bachelor's degree in horn performance from the City University of New York in 2007 studying with David Jolley. She is currently in her first year pursuing a Doctoral degree in composition and computer technologies at the University of Virginia where she is a Jefferson Scholar Fellow.

 


Eli Stine

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Email
Eli Stine's Website

Biography

Eli Stine is a composer, programmer, and media designer. Stine is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Composition and Computer Technologies as a Jefferson Fellow at the University of Virginia. Stine is a graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory with degrees in Technology In Music And Related Arts and Computer Science. Stine’s work ranges from acoustic to electronic composition, and frequently incorporates multimedia technologies and collaboration, seeking to explore the intersections between performed and computer-generated art. Festivals and conferences that have programmed Stine's work include the International Computer Music Conference, Society for Electroacoustic Music in the United States conferences, International Symposium on Computer Music Multidisciplinary Research, Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, New York City Electroacoustic Music, Third Practice, Studio 300, and Threshold festivals, the Muestra Internacional de Música Electroacústica, the Spatial Music Workshop, and the International Sound Art Festival Berlin. Most recently Stine created sound design for a VR adaptation of Kafka’s Metamorphosis that is touring the world. More information and work may be found at www.elistine.com.

 


Tracey Stewart

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 215
Email

Biography

Ph.D. candidate Tracey Mia Stewart, originally of Westbury, New York, joined the Critical and Comparative Studies program in 2013, after earning a Bachelor of Music from Howard University in Washington, DC.  Tracey’s undergraduate concentration was in Music History, and culminated in the writing of her senior thesis which focused on the treatment of death as a theme in Richard Strauss’ Symphonic Poem Tod und Verklӓrung (Death and Transfiguration).  As a Fulbright Fellow, Tracey spent ten months in Jamaica, West Indies researching the music and history of the Jamaican Maroons.  She explored the existence of a shared rhythm linking Jamaican Maroons to people of African Ancestry in the Carolinas and Georgia of the United States, and certain peoples of West Africa.  Tracey’s research interests include the music of the African diaspora throughout the Caribbean, North America and Africa, the music of resistance in the history of Americans of African Ancestry in the United States, and European music of the Romantic Era.  Tracey plays both the piano and the trumpet, and especially enjoys the music of composer Claude Debussy.


Aaron Stepp

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Old Cabell 213
Email
Justin Mueller

Justin Mueller

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 212
Email

Biography

Justin Mueller is a PhD candidate currently enrolled in the Critical and Comparative Studies program at the University of Virginia.  His particular research interests revolve around German opera and culture in the Long Nineteenth Century—with a particular focus on the works of Mozart and Wagner—but he is also concerned with exploring larger questions of dramaturgy, mise-en-scène, reception history, and media theory as they relate to current opera staging and practices. Justin’s research has been presented at both local and national conference meetings, with recent talks at the annual conferences for Music and the Moving Image, the American Society of Eighteenth Century Studies, The Mozart Society of America, and more.

Prior arriving in Charlottesville, Justin earned degrees from Stony Brook University (2011) and, later, Tufts University (2013), where his master’s thesis addressed how video and cinematic technologies have impacted the world of opera production in recent decades.

 


Ryan Maguire

Ryan Maguire

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Email
Ryan Maguire's Website

Biography

Ryan Maguire listens/writes to/for people/computers. Before moving to Virginia, he spent five years in the Northeast earning degrees from Dartmouth College and The New England Conservatory of Music. He is currently a Ph.D. student in Composition and Computer Technologies at the University of Virginia and loves experiencing, crafting, contemplating, and talking music with others. In his free time you can find him outside.


Christopher Luna-Mega photo

Christopher Luna-Mega

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Email

Biography

Christopher Luna-Mega is a composer and improviser. He studied Composition at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México –UNAM (B.M.) and Mills College (M.A.), as well as Film/Communication Theory at the Universidad Iberoamericana –UIA, Mexico City (B.A.). Interested in focused listening, improvisation, contemplation and silence, his work analyzes sounds from natural and urban environments and translates them into notated music for performers and electronics.

His orchestral music has been performed by the Orquestra del Teatro Comunale di Bologna, BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Iceland Symphony Orchestra, Montreal-Toronto Art Orchestra, and Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional de México, conducted by Tonino Battista, Ilan Volkov, Gregory Oh and José Luis Castillo, respectively. Ensembles that have performed his instrumental works include the New Thread Quartet, Yarn|Wire, The William Winant Percussion Group, JACK Quartet, and The Arditti String Quartet. His music has been featured in festivals such as the New York City Electroacoustic Music Festival, Seoul International Computer Music Festival (Gwanju), AgelicA (Bologna), Tectonics (Reykjavik), Tectonics (Glasgow), L’Off (Montreal), Avant X (Toronto), Mills Music Now (Oakland, CA), and the International Forum for New Music “Manuel Enriquez” (Mexico City).   

Luna-Mega has taught Composition, Musicianship, Theory, Orchestration, and Introduction to Electronic Music in the National School of Music in Mexico, Mills College, and the University of Virginia, where he currently pursues a PhD in Composition and Computer Technologies as a Jefferson Scholars Foundation fellow.


Steven Lewis

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Email

Stephanie Gunst

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Email

Biography

Stephanie Gunst is a Ph.D. student in the Critical and Comparative Studies program at the University of Virginia. Prior to U.Va., she received her B.A. in Music at SUNY Stony Brook and her M.A. at Tufts University. Broadly, she is interested in issues of identity politics in the contexts of popular music and music in film, which have manifested thus far in her Master’s thesis Pam Grier and the Articulation of Female Subjectivity in Blaxploitation Theme Songs. She has presented on Pam Grier’s films and Lady Gaga at such national conferences as FTM and IASPM-US, respectively. In addition to her musicological work, Stephanie enjoys playing cello, exploring new places, and keeping up with the ever-pervasive meme culture.


Tanner Greene

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Old Cabell 212
Email

Aldona Dye

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Email

Biography

Aldona is a doctoral candidate in the Critical and Comparative Studies program. She is working on a dissertation on white womanhood and folk song collecting practices in the early 20th century under the guidance of Bonnie Gordon. Her research centers on the work of the Virginia Folklore Society, Annabel Morris Buchanan, Ruby Pickens Tartt, and Zilphia Horton. Aldona is interested in song collecting as an intimate act of sharing local knowledge and connecting with others.

You can follow Aldona's research online here:
Blog: tumblr.com/adyemusicology
Twitter: @ADyeMusicology

 


Craig Comen

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Email

Biography

Craig Comen is a PhD candidate in Critical and Comparative Studies, currently finishing a dissertation entitled “At the Origins of Music Analysis.” Combining perspectives from aesthetic philosophy, cultural history, and music criticism of the long eighteenth century, his research is devoted to highlighting music analysis as a historical practice over two centuries old. His first article, “Hoffmann’s Musical Modernity and the Pursuit of Sentimental Unity,” was published in Eighteenth-Century Music, and he has contributions forthcoming in Music Theory Online and Music & Letters.


Victoria Clark

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Email

Biography

PhD student in Critical and Comparative Studies in Music. Studies 20th century American music and representations of American Indians. Invested in public and digital humanities and how music narratives are presented in museums and institutions. Recipient of the Praxis Program Fellowship for 2017-2018, and the Everett Helm Visiting Fellowship for 2018.


Kyle Chattleton

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Email

Biography

Kyle is a PhD candidate in the Critical and Comparative Studies program. His research explores how sound becomes an affective site for political expression, as well as how those expressions are strategized, regulated, and articulate power relations. His dissertation—“Speech, Affecting Sound, and the Dimensions of Protest in Charlottesville, VA”—is funded by an Arts & Sciences Dean’s Dissertation Completion Fellowship. While most of his scholarship is rooted in the realms of ethnomusicology and sound studies, Kyle is also concerned with classical music since the 1900s, American popular music, the avant-garde, historiography, and applied scholarship.

He has served as a William R. Kenan, Jr. Fellow of the Academical Village, as well as a Graduate Fellow of the Power, Violence, and Inequality Collective—an organization inspired by President Theresa Sullivan’s call for UVA to become a model institution in preventing and responding to structural violence. His work has appeared at, or is scheduled for, the ASLCH, IASPM-US, MACSEM, SCGMC, and SEM annual conferences.

Graduating in 2013, Kyle received dual bachelor degrees (magna cum laude) in Music and Music Composition from Chapman University in his home state of California. In his spare time, he hikes the Blue Ridge Mountains, watches PMQs, plays banjo, and enjoys Shakespeare. He also hosts a 20th/21st century classical music radio program on WTJU, where he has served as the Director of Classical Programming.

 


Staff

Rodell Tolliver

Assistant Band Director

Hunter Smith Band Building, 180 Culbreth Road

1-434-982-5347
Email

Gregory Barroso

Marching Band Administrative and Events Assistant

Hunter Smith Band Building, 180 Culbreth Road

434-982-5347
Email

Kim Turner

Administrative Supervisor

Old Cabell 114

434-924-6491
Email

Travis Thatcher

Technical Director of Composition & Computer Technologies

Wilson 105

434-924-7355
Email

Martha Pullen

Administrative Assistant, Graduate Program Coordinator

Old Cabell 112

434-924-3052
Email
Tina Knight

Tina Knight

Assistant to the Chair, Academic Program Coordinator

Old Cabell 114

434-924-1435
Email

Joel Jacobus

Director of Music Production

Old Cabell 114

434-924-4485
Email

Michael Idzior

Assistant Athletics Band Director

Hunter Smith Band Building, 180 Culbreth Road

434-243-5375
Email

Marcy Day

Director of Promotions

Old Cabell 114

434-924-6492
Email

Faculty, Emeritus

Kate Tamarkin

Professor Emeritus and Director of Charlottesville Symphony

Email

Biography

Kate Tamarkin joined the faculty of the University of Virginia in the fall of 2006 bringing a background of over twenty years as a professional conductor and educator. She is currently the Music Director Laureate of the Charlottesville and University Symphony Orchestra, having retired from the Orchestra and the University of Virginia in May of 2017.  She has been Music Director of the Monterey Symphony (CA), Vermont Symphony, East Texas Symphony, and the Fox Valley Symphony Orchestra (WI). She was also the Associate Conductor of the Dallas Symphony under the late Eduardo Mata.

 

Her guest conducting credits include the Shanghai Symphony, Edmonton Symphony, National Symphony of Moldova, and the following US orchestras:  Chicago, Houston, St. Louis, Phoenix, Nashville, New Mexico, Oklahoma City, Tucson, Pacific (CA), Eastern Music Festival (NC), and Chicago’s Grant Park Festival.

Ms. Tamarkin is a Certified Music Practitioner on the harp and is a Musician in Residence at the UVa Medical Center as well as the Program Coordinator for “Music by the Bedside” for the Hospice of the Piedmont.  

Ms. Tamarkin holds a Doctor of Musical Arts from the Peabody Conservatory of Music, a Masters Degree in Orchestral Conducting from Northwestern University, and a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Chapman University in California.  

 


Marita McClymonds

Professor Emeritus


(434) 977-2919
Email
Oxford Music Online

Biography

Prior to her graduate work she taught music privately and in public schools in Missouri and Illinois. Her academic career began in 1981, when she was appointed professor of music at the University of Virginia, where she was also chair of the music department (1988–95, 1998–9). Her dissertation on Jommelli's last years proved to be the starting point for extensive, wide-ranging studies on 18th-century Italian opera, in particular treating the innovations and modifications in opera seria during the second half of the century; these studies have thrown new light on the background to the operas of Mozart, Haydn and Gluck, and have focussed scholarly attention on the librettist Mattia Verazi.

Writings

Niccolò Jommelli: the Last Years, 1769–1774 (diss., U. of California, Berkeley, 1978; Ann Arbor, 1980)

‘The Evolution of Jommelli's Operatic Style’, JAMS, xxxiii (1980), 326–55

‘Jommellis Opernsinfonien der 1750er Jahre und ihre Beziehung zum Mannheimer Stil’, Mannheim und Italien: Mannheim 1982, 97–120

‘Mattia Verazi and the Opera at Mannheim, Stuttgart and Ludwigsburg’, SMC, vii (1982), 99–136

‘Mozart's La clemenza di Tito and Opera seria in Florence in the 1780s as a Reflection of Leopold II's Musical Taste’, MJb 1984–5, 61–70

‘Jommelli's Last Opera for Germany: the Opera seria-comica La schiava liberata (Ludwigsburg, 1768)’, CMc, no.39 (1985), 7–20

with D.P. Walker: ‘U.S. RISM Libretto Project’, Notes, xliii (1986–7), 19–35

‘The Venetian Role in the Transformation of Italian Opera seria during the 1790s’, I vicini di Mozart: Venice 1987, 221–40

‘Mannheim, Idomeneo, and the Franco-Italian Synthesis in Opera seria’, Mozart und Mannheim: Mannheim 1991, 187–96

‘Haydn and the Opera seria Tradition’, Napoli e il teatro musicale in Europa tra Sette e Ottocento: Studi in onore di Friedrich Lippmann, ed. B.M. Antolini and W. Witzenmann (Florence, 1993), 191–206

‘Two Early Romantic Operas with Iberian Roots: Il conte di Saldagna and Ines de Castro’, IMSCR XV: Madrid 1992 [RdMc, xvi (1993)], 3089–100

ed., with T. Bauman: Opera and the Enlightenment (Cambridge, 1995) [incl. ‘Transforming Opera seria: Verazi's Innovations and their Impact on Opera in Italy’, 119–32]

‘The Great Quartet in Idomeneo and the Italian Opera seria Tradition’, Wolfgang Amadè Mozart: Essays on his Life and his Music, ed. S. Sadie (Oxford, 1996), 449–76

‘Jommelli, Verazi, und Vologeso: das hochdramatische Ergebnis einer schöpferischen Zusammenarbeit’, Musik in Baden-Württemberg, iii (1996), 213–22

‘Bianca de' Rossi as Play, Ballet and Opera: Contours of “Modern” Historical Tragedy in the 1790s’, Comparative Drama, xxxi (1997), 158–77

‘Mozart and his Contemporaries: Action Trios by Paisiello, Cimarosa, Martin and Mozart’, Festschrift Christoph-Hellmut Mahling, ed. A. Beer, K. Pfarr and W. Ruf (Tutzing, 1997), 853–82

‘Opera seria? Opera buffa? Genre and Style as a Sign’, Opera buffa in Mozart's Vienna, ed. M. Hunter and J. Webster (Cambridge, 1997), 197–231

‘Verazi's Controversial Drammi in azione as Realized in the Music of Salieri, Anfossi, Alessandri and Mortarelli for the Opening of La Sala 1778–1779’, Scritti in memoria Claudio Sartori, ed. M. Donà and F. Lesure (Lucca, 1997), 43–87


Walter Ross

Professor Emeritus


(434) 293-9617
Email
Website

Biography

Walter Ross, whose works have been performed in over 40 countries, is perhaps best known for his compositions featuring brass and woodwinds. Raised in Nebraska, he became a professional orchestral French horn player by the age of seventeen and went on to gain more performance experience in college as a member of the University of Nebraska symphonic band, and as a flute player with a baroque ensemble. Currently he plays bass in the Blue Ridge Chamber Orchestra. After four years of engineering and astronomy, he switched to music, receiving much of his early compositional training under Robert Beadell. While working on his doctoral degree at Cornell (where he studied under Robert Palmer and Karel Husa), he received an Organization of American States Fellowship to study composition privately under Alberto Ginastera in Argentina.

The influences of his own extensive performance background and his musical training under composers who stressed bright orchestration and rhythmic excitement can be heard in many of Ross' over one hundred works. He likes to write music that musicians enjoy performing and audiences enjoy hearing. Many of his recent works are representative of his current interest in neo-modal, pandiatonic composition.

Ross has already written a number of major orchestral concertos including ones for oboe and harp, bassoon, clarinet, piano, flute and guitar, trombone, tuba, double bass, and violin. He is currently writing a Concerto for 'Cello and Orchestra. He prefers the concerto form to that of the symphony because of its more varied possibilities for artistic expression in contrasting the solo against the orchestra. Three of his concertos are featured on his latest CD and five more have been recorded and will be released soon.

In 1997 he wrote a cantata featuring the poetry of Rita Dove, American Poet Laureate. She sang as the soloist at the premier with the Charlottesville Oratorio Society. Recent choral works include Evensong and Lux Aeterna. Written to honor the victims of 9/11, Lux Aeterna has been performed at Ground Zero among many other locations

Ross has received a number of awards and prizes and many significant grants and fellowships. His work is widely performed, and many of his compositions have been published and recorded. Currently a resident of Charlottesville, Virginia, he has served as president of the Southeastern Composers League and served as a judge at international composition symposia. He has been a visiting composer at the Aspen Music Festival and a featured composer at several universities and forums and on national and international radio broadcasts, and a member of the board of the Capital Composers Alliance.


Donald Loach

Professor Emeritus


(434) 296-6782
Email
Wikipedia

Biography

Donald Loach is Associate Professor Emeritus of Music at the University of Virginia where he taught courses in music history and theory, and conducted numerous student choral ensembles including the University of Virginia Glee Club, University Singers, and Coro Virginia. In the Charlottesville community, he was for many years music director of the Charlottesville/Albemarle Oratorio Society now called the Virginia Oratorio Society and of the senior choir of St. Paul's Memorial Church. He continues to teach general music courses, primarily for older students, through the UVa School of Continuing and Professional Studies and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. His principal field of scholarship centers on the history of Renaissance Music.

Loach was born and raised in Denver and became a conducting student of Antonia Brico when he was 14 years old. After completing the BA degree in music studies at the University of Denver, he continued his studies of music theory and organ at the Yale School of Music, earning both a BMus and MMus. After a few years as assistant in instruction at Yale he returned to graduate studies at the University of California, Berkeley, where he received his Ph.D. in musicology. At Yale he studied under Paul Hindemith and managed Hindemith's Collegium Musicum. He also spent one year with Hindemith at the University of Zurich, Switzerland.[1]

Loach joined the University of Virginia faculty in 1964. Loach was popular as a professor, noting in a 1972 Cavalier Daily interview that his classes were oversubscribed and that growth in the music department was inevitable.[2] During his tenure as director of what was then known as the University of Virginia Glee Club he developed a choral section of countertenors, which enabled the ensemble to perform a wider repertory including masterpieces of Renaissance polyphony. These included masses by Josquin des Prez and Cipriano De RoreThomas Tallis's "Lamentation of Jeremiah," and many secular pieces. He led the Glee Club in participation in the inaugural Harvard Festival of Men's Choruses in 1977.[3]

In addition to his work with the Virginia Glee Club, Loach also conducted the University Singers and founded Coro Virginia, a smaller mixed-voice ensemble, that he founded in 1989, the year he resigned as Virginia Glee Club conductor. Each December the University Singers produced a Renaissance Madrigal Dinner and Concert. During his time as music director both the Virginia Glee Club and the University Singers embarked on numerous European tours, beginning with a Virginia Glee Club tour of Italy, Austria, Germany, and Switzerland in 1972. Tours to Russia (then the Soviet Union), Paris and northern France, Spain, Belgium and the Rhineland, and Italy followed. Often the concerts were performed jointly with choirs from the visited communities.

In addition to the choral ensembles at the University of Virginia, he served as music director of the Oratorio Society of Virginia and as organist/music director of St. Paul's Memorial Church in Charlottesville. In his retirement, Loach continues to lead the University community's annual Messiah sing-alongs.[4]


Alumni

Kristina Warren

Kristina Warren

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Old Cabell 215

434-924-6501
Email
Kristina Warren's Website

Biography

Kristina Warren is an electroacoustic composer and vocalist based in Virginia. Interests include creating and playing graphic and text scores, digitally processing her voice, and noise and repetition. Her music has been played across the US and Europe; at festivals such as EABD, FEASt, ICMC, N_SEME, and NYCEMF; and by ensembles such as Dither, Ekmeles, loadbang, the Meehan/Perkins Duo, and Sō Percussion. In 2014 she was named a finalist in the American Composers Forum National Composition Contest. Warren is pursuing a Ph.D. in Composition and Computer Technologies from the University of Virginia, and holds a B.A. in Music Composition from Duke University.


Max Tfirn

Max Tfirn

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)


434-924-3108
Email
Max Tfirn's Website

Biography

Max Tfirn is a third year Ph.D. student at the University of Virginia, pursuing his degree in Composition and Computer Technology. He received a Masters degree from Wesleyan University in Music Composition and a Bachelors degree in Music Education as well as a performance certificate in percussion.  Rich timbres and diverse sounds is a focal point of Maxwell's compositional practice. He tries to create sounds that can stand on their own and be used to create both thin and thick densities without changing the root of the sound.  Sounds that are not familiar to the listener are at the core of his compositions. Every composition is an exploration of sound, how sound can be created and what emotional effects they can create.

Max has had work performed at Society of Electro Acoustic Music United States (SEAMUS), FIU FEAST Festival, 12 Nights Festival of Electronic Music and Art Series as well as the Subtropics Music festival, N_SEME (National Student Electronic Music Event), Electroacoustic Barn Dance, Technosonics Festival, and the South Central Music Consortium (SCGMC). He has worked with Dr. Ted Coffey, Dr. Matthew Burtner, Anthony Braxton, Dr. Paula Matthusen, Ronald Kuivila and Dr. James Paul Sain.


Liza Flood

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Email

Biography

Liza Sapir Flood is a Ph.D. candidate in Critical and Comparative Studies in Music. Her research and teaching interests include country and bluegrass, U.S. roots music and musical subcultures, and West African musical traditions. She approaches these topics with specific attention to intersections of class and gender, class culture, amateur music-making practices, revivalism, and ethnographic methodology. Liza is currently completing a dissertation based on two years of fieldwork in western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee. The dissertation investigates women’s negotiation of country music performance practices and aesthetics to show how classed ideas of personhood affect the way that gender is lived.


Jarek Ervin

Jarek Paul Ervin

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Email

Biography

Jarek Paul Ervin is a scholar working at the intersection of musicology, cultural studies, philosophy, and social theory. Broadly, Ervin’s thought investigates the overlapping and often conflicting dynamics of music as aesthetic practice, social force, historical inheritance, and a privileged window into the domain of sensory experience. Specific avenues for this inquiry include: popular music studies, twentieth century music, and American music; philosophy of music, especially historical materialism, German Idealism, and critical theory (Lukács, Benjamin, Bloch, and Adorno); and gender and sexuality in music.

Ervin is currently a PhD candidate in University of Virginia’s McIntire Department of Music. His dissertation focuses on New York punk during the 1970s. Drawing on a range of archival and recorded materials, the project explores the way the category punk served as a fragile placeholder for a diverse and polemical musical practice during its early history. Ultimately, this leads to an interrogation of broader issues related to genre theory, philosophy of music, and popular music’s troubled internal history.

Ervin’s published work appears with or is forthcoming in Popular Music, Popular Music & Society, and Jacobin. He has also presented at a number of recent conferences including 2014’s Left Forum and IASPM-US 2016. Ervin has held fellowships from the Library of Congress and UVa’s Vice President's Office for Research, and was a 2015 Gladys Krieble Delmas Visiting Scholar at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s Library and Archives. In 2016, his work will be supported by a Battestin Fellowship from the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia.
 
For more about his work, visit his website: www.jarekpaulervin.com

 


Stephanie Doktor

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Email

Biography

Stephanie joined the Critical and Comparative studies program in 2009, after graduating from the University of Georgia with an M.A. in Musicology and a Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies. Since joining the program, she has focused on twentieth-century music with an ear towards American traditions. Her research interests include intersections of race, gender, and sexuality as they materialize in music-cultures; pop historiography; American modernism; post-war jazz; and women singer-songwriters. Stephanie has presented research at numerous conferences including SEM, AMS, FTM, IASPM, and, in 2009, she won the Marcia Herndon award for presenting work from her thesis on cross-gender cover songs of The Rolling Stones’ “Satisfaction.” In 2013, she began work on a dissertation about the racialized interactions between jazz and classical music, from the symphonic jazz vogue of the 1920s to the Third Stream inventions of the 1950s.


Kevin Davis

Kevin Davis

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Old Cabell 213

434-924-6494
Email

Biography

Kevin W. Davis is a composer, improviser, and cellist. Originally from Appalachian Tennessee, he has at various times been based out of Memphis, Chicago, New York, and Istanbul, where he has played in and composed for a large variety of musical situations across a wide spectrum of contemporary music. He has recorded and performed in the United States, Europe, and the Middle East. He has degrees in music composition from the University of Memphis (B. Music) and the Centre for Advanced Musical Studies (MIAM) in Istanbul, Turkey (MA). He is currently pursuing a PhD in Composition and Computer Technologies at the University of Virginia.

After many years of focusing his artistic practice on improvisation, Kevin has recently become re-engaged with more traditional forms of composition. His recent creative work deals with mediating the sometimes-problematic relationship between composition and improvisation by bringing differing types of structure into confrontation with the unstable properties present in motion, gesture, and sound.

 


Amy Coddington

Amy Coddington

CCS (Critical & Comparative Studies)

Email

Biography

Amy Coddington is a Ph.D. student in Critical and Comparative Studies.  She is interested, broadly, in the use of timbre as an analytical tool--more specifically, she works on what race and class sound like in contemporary top 40 music. She is originally from Eugene, Oregon and studied math and music at Macalester College, where she completed a thesis analyzing the music of singer/songwriter Aimee Mann. Before coming to UVa, Amy taught music and math to middle and high school students first in Maine, and then in Memphis, TN.  Amy acts as the artistic director for Bel Canto Vocal Ensemble in Madison, VA. In her spare time, Amy enjoys reading about food, cooking food, eating food, and talking about food. 


Jon Bellona

Jon Bellona

CCT (Composition & Computer Technologies)

Email
jpbellona.com

Biography

Jon Bellona is an intermedia artist/composer who specializes in digital technologies.

Jon’s research includes data-driven control of electronic music performance; constructing musical spaces for deep listening; and collaborating with other disciplines to inform how we create musical experiences.

Jon's music and intermedia work have been shown internationally including KISS (Kyma International Sound Symposium); SEAMUS (Society for Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States); IMAC (Interactive Media Arts Conference); SLEO (Symposium on Laptop Ensembles and Orchestras); FMO (Future Music Oregon) concerts; with special performances at the Casa da Musica (Porto, Portugal) and CCRMA (Palo Alto, CA).

Jon received his M.Mus. in Intermedia Music Technology from the University of Oregon, audio engineering degree from the Conservatory for Recording Arts & Sciences, and B.A. from Hamilton College. Jon is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in Composition and Computer Technologies (CCT) at the University of Virginia and is part of the art collective, Harmonic Laboratory.

 


Address

McIntire Department of Music
112 Old Cabell Hall
P.O. Box 400176 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4176

Email: music@virginia.edu