Summer 2021 Courses

Summer 2021 Courses

Session I (May 24-June 16)

MUSI 2080 American Music 
MUSI 3080 American Music (Combined Sections)
Topic: Intro to Black Music and Corporate America

Rami Stucky
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 10:30am - 12:45pm / Online
Class Number: 11861 / 11871

MUSI 3080 counts as CCS or elective in the Music Major.

We will study how black music, specifically jazz and rock and roll, have become part of the language of corporate America. How do real estate agents, newspapers, magazines, corporations, and job recruiters use music-related vocabulary to market housing, goods, and employment opportunities? We will look in our own communities for corporations using musical keywords to market themselves and attract consumers and employees. And we will consider how activism might respond to the corporate use of terms like “rock and roll,” “rockstar,” “collaboration,” and “improvisation.” Music and non-music students are welcome to enroll.

MUSI 4331 Theory III

Fred Maus
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 10:30am - 12:45pm / Online
Class Number: 12462

Studies in 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century techniques and styles through analysis and composition. Prerequisite: MUSI 3320 or instructor permission.

MUSI 2559 Introduction to Songwriting
MUSI 3370 Songwriting (Combined Sections)

Heather Mease
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-3:15pm / Online
Class Number: 11866 / 11874

MUSI 3370 counts as composition or elective in the Music Major.

Develop aural, analytic and creative abilities through songwriting. Learn about rhythm, melodic design, harmonic progression, lyrics and song forms. Develop ear training, so that concepts you learn will be sonically meaningful. Examples considered from blues, folk, tin pan alley, musicals, R&B, rock and hip hop.

Session II (June 21-July 16)

MUSI 2340 Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-2:30pm / Online
Class Number: 11864

Counts as performance in the Music Major.

This is a hand drumming class open to all students including music majors. The course requires that students have a hand drum of their own as well as the course book Learn To Groove. Congas, djembes, doumbeks are appropriate. The class will focus on simple hand drumming technique and time keeping along with understanding and playing syncopated patterns. The history, geography and artists associated with the rhythms presented in the course will be included. The course is designed to help students achieve fluency with syncopated patterns that are associated with dance rhythms from West Africa, the Caribbean, Brazil, and the United States.

MUSI 2559 Introduction to Online Jamming and Music Making
MUSI 4559 Online Jamming and Music Making (Combined Sections)

Juan Carlos Vasquez
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 10:30am - 12:45pm / Online
Class Number: 11868 / 11875 

MUSI 4559 counts as composition or elective in the Music Major.

We are surviving a time without in-person concerts and looking to a future in which live music events may be increasingly organized technologically across long distances. The course works with interactive music and video tools, techniques and theory. It includes lectures on aesthetics and theory, seminar discussions based on readings in interactive media, and labs and hacking sessions focused on group collaborative jams using our instruments and/or computers.

MUSI 4559 Arts Activism, Liberated Spaces and Creative Economies at The Black Power Station

Noel Lobley
3.0 credits
Lecture: TBA / Online
Class Number: 12078

Counts as CCS or seminar or elective in the Music Major.

This course, co-taught with instructors in Makhanda, South Africa, introduces students to the synergies among African humanism, arts, economics and community power, building on relationships nurtured between the spaces in Makhanda and UVA for more than a decade. Students will learn about black consciousness, histories of black resistance, and African humanism from a leading South African scholar. They will learn from arts-based activists about how to design, build and sustain arts programming and creative economies that embody African humanism and promote black liberation. The course overlaps with The National Arts Festival in Makhanda, the biggest inter-arts festival on the African continent. All students will have a chance to contribute in various ways to live arts events.

Session III (July 19-August 12)

MUSI 2120 History of Jazz Music
MUSI 3120 Jazz Studies (Combined Sections)

John D'earth
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 10:30am - 12:45pm / Online
Class Number: 11862 / 11872

MUSI 3120 counts as CCS or elective in the Music Major.

An in-depth look at the way jazz musicians listen to music. What do they listen for? How do they use recordings of great jazz performances to grow as musicians and improvising artists? What skills are required to develop timing, phrasing, and musical creativity? The course will examine the recorded work of major jazz artists, exploring the “inner hearing” of musicians with participatory exercises in rhythm, melody and movement. It will demonstrate the processes by which jazz musicians master theory, musical structure, their instruments, and the jazz language itself. For musicians and non-musicians; no previous jazz or musical experience necessary.

MUSI 2307 Play Guitar!

Michael Rosensky
2.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-2:30pm / Online
Class Number: 11863

Fundamentals of playing the guitar: left and right hands, chords, strumming, and scales. We'll also incorporate rhythmic training, music theory, song form, pop/rock styles and accompanimental textures. The course is designed to improve guitar performance.

The course will work with a range of experience levels. Please email the instructor, Mike Rosensky (mlr5q@virginia.edu) and give a brief description of your guitar experience when you register for the class (or if you have questions).

Students must provide their own guitar.

MUSI 2570 Music Cultures
MUSI 3570 Music Cultures (Combined Section)
Topic: Music and Sports

Natalia Perez
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-3:15pm / Online
Class Number: 11870 / 11877

MUSI 3570 counts as CCS or elective in the Music Major.

It’s hard to imagine sports without music. Music is used in sporting events to arouse excitement in spectators (through anthems, chants, and half time shows, etc.); music is played during athletic events themselves (like those used in group exercise classes or part of choreographed routines); music is used in sports campaigns and commercials; artists frequently nod to sports culture in their music, music videos, or in live performance. We will consider cultural metaphors that have developed around certain music genres and sports, and instances where artists wrote songs about sports or performed in athletic venues.

Address

UVA Department of Music
112 Old Cabell Hall
P.O. Box 400176 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4176

Email: music@virginia.edu