2012-2013 Courses

Fall 2012

Undergraduate Academic Courses

MUSI 1040 Exploring the Orchestra

Kate Tamarkin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-11:50 am / Maury Hall 104
Class Number: 19639

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Jarek Ervin): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 19640

Section 102 (Jarek Ervin): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number:19641

Section 103 (Jarek Ervin): F / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number:19642

An introduction to the tradition and repertory of the symphony orchestra.  Topics include the development and instrumental makeup of the modern symphony orchestra, forms and genres, and the role of the conductor.

MUSI 1070 Global Music

Catherine Appert
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 4:00-4:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 19647

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Liza Flood): W / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 19648

Section 102 (Liza Flood): W / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number:19649

Section 103 (Liza Flood): W / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number:19650

This introductory coursetraces intersecting paths of people and music as they move across continents and oceans: African and African diaspora musics, Indian musics as they travel through the South Asian diaspora, musics of the Roma people across Europe, and popular musics produced in the United States and disseminated globally. We explore diverse genres such as salsa, bhangra, hip hop, flamenco, Bollywood, and reggae, considering issues including imperialism, migration, diaspora, and global capitalism as they affect music making. No prior musical experience is necessary.

MUSI 1310 Basic Musical Skills

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Chris Peck): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11199

Lecture / Section 2 (Steve Kemper): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number:11200

Lecture / Section 3 (Emily Gale): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number:11201

Study of the rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music.  Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of music required.

 

MUSI 1993 Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 2020 Opera

Heather Wiebe
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00 am-11:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19651

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Courtney Kleftis): F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19652

Section 102 (Courtney Kleftis): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number:19653

Section 103 (Courtney Kleftis): F / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number:19654

This course will explore the history of opera primarily through a set of representative works, including Don Giovanni, The Barber of Seville, Carmen, La Traviata, and Wagner’s Ring Cycle. We will address the changing conventions of operatic music and dramaturgy, as well as the ways particular operas engaged with the societies that produced them, but we will also be concerned with the contemporary life of these operas, exploring issues raised by their staging for modern audiences and their mediation by film, recordings, digital media, and simulcast. No previous musical knowledge is required.

MUSI 2070 Popular Music: History of Rock

Michael Bishop
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:45 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 21448

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Jason Kirby): T / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 21449

Section 102 (Jason Kirby): T / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 21450

Section 103 (Jason Kirby): T / 3:30-4:20 pm / OCH 113 
Class Number: 21451

This course is intended to help you think critically about rock music and its history. We explore this history by tracing the roots of the music and following the development of rock genres and styles in chronological order while looking at the music in its social, political and historical context. We will pay particular attention to how rock music intersects with issues of “authenticity,” the influence of mass media and technology on the music and the role of rock as a symbol of identity involving race, class, gender, sexuality and generation. Along the way, we investigate narratives of rock history from journalistic and academic sources while gaining an overview of approaches to listening, thinking and writing about the music.

MUSI 2080 American Music

Joel Rubin
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-2:50 pm / Maury 104
Class Number: 15756

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Jean Maroun): F / 3:00-3:50 pm / OCH 113 
Class Number:15757

Section 102 (Jean Maroun): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number:15758

Section 103 (Jean Maroun): F / 2:00-2:50 am / OCH 113 
Class Number:15759

American Music (“Roots Music of Multicultural America”) looks at American traditional and popular musics from a cross-cultural and multi-ethnic perspective. We will examine the traditions most often called “roots music,” including African-American blues and southern old-time string band music, which influenced the development of rock and roll and country and western. Broadening out from there, we will also study a wide range of other ethnic musical traditions, from Native American pow wows and Cajun to salsa, klezmer and Balkan-Gypsy-punk, which have influenced popular music-making of the past twenty-five years. Along the way we will treat a complex and shifting web of associated ideas, such as authenticity, heritage, nationalism, and multiculturalism, and the musical or music-marketing categories of folk, traditional, roots, world music, and indie rock. We will ask how “roots” traditions have fed into definitions of “American-ness” over the years, and whether recent trends represent signs of America’s transforming itself into a post-ethnic, post-racial society. This course is designed for non-music majors. There are no prerequisites, and musical literacy is not assumed.

MUSI 2302 Keyboard Skills (Beginning)

2.0 credits, instructor permission

Lecture / Section 1 (John Mayhood): TR / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 11207

Lecture / Section 2 (John Mayhood): TR / 12:30-1:20 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 16868

Introductory keyboard skills; includes sight-reading, improvisation, and accompaniment at the keyboard in a variety of styles. No previous knowledge of music required. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors.

MUSI 2340 Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1: MW / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 12258

Lecture / Section 2: MW / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 14969

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns. This course will follow my book "Learn To Groove" and can include music students, non music students and is open to students of all skill levels. The course requires that students have or purchase a hand drum of their own. Congas, bongos, djembes, doumbeks or any other hand drums are appropriate.

MUSI 2350 Technosonics: Digital Music and Sound Art Composition

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 12:00-12:50 / Maury Hall 209
Class Number: 16392

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Paul Turowski): M / 9:00-9:50 am / Wilson 306 
Class Number: 16393

Section 102 (Paul Turowski): M / 10:00-10:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 16394

Section 103 (Paul Turowski): M / 11:00-11:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 16395

Section 104 (Maxwell Tfirn): R / 9:00-9:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 16396

Section 105 (Maxwell Tfirn): R / 10:00-10:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 16397

Section 106 (Maxwell Tfirn): R / 1:00-1:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 16398

Section 107 (Kristina Warren): T / 10:00-10:50 am / Wilson 306
Class Number: 16399

Section 108 (Kristina Warren): T / 2:00-2:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 16400

Section 109 (Kristina Warren): T / 3:00-3:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 16401

Section 110 (Kevin Davis): M / 1:00-1:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 19655

Section 111 (Kevin Davis): M / 2:00-2:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 19656

Section 112 (Kevin Davis): M / 3:00-3:50 pm / Wilson 306
Class Number: 19657

This class (www.technosonics.net) explores the history, theory and practice of digital music and sound art. Students learn tools and techniques of music technology that inform many genres and traditions. In addition to historical and theoretical concerns, students will experiment with digital tools for musical creation.

MUSI 2559 New Course in Music: Vocal Skills

Pam Beasley
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW /4:00-4:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 20440

An introductory course to basic vocal technique; discussion to include those elements essential for healthy singing in a variety of styles. Will involve group and solo singing to apply these elements. No previous voice training or musical background required.

MUSI 2600 Jazz Improvisation

John D'earth
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 14600

MUSI 2993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 3010 Early Modern Music (1500-1700)

Bonnie Gordon
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00 am-12:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19658

 

MUSI 3030 Studies in Nineteenth-Century Music

Heather Wiebe
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19659

This course examines the history of 19th-century vocal and instrumental music. Looking closely at a range of musical works and writing about music, it addresses topics such as gender and domesticity, virtuosity and spectacle, nationalism and revolutionary politics, Romantic interiority, modernity and the urban, and monumentality.

MUSI 3050 Music and Discourse Since 1900

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Stephanie Doktor): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 11209

Lecture / Section 2 (Fred Maus): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 19661

Studies the range of music that has flourished in the twentieth century, including modernist and post-modern art music, popular music, and world music, through historical, critical, and ethnographic approaches.

MUSI 3070 Intro to Musical Ethnography

Catherine Appert
3.0 credits
Lecture: MWF / 1:00-1:50 am, OCH B012
Class Number: 19660

 

MUSI 3310 Theory I

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Amy Coddington): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11210

Lecture / Section 2 (Gretchen Michelson): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11211

Lecture / Section 3 (Scott DeVeaux): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11212

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significant compositions by period composers. (Y)

MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336 Musicianship I, II and III

1.0 credit

All students must take a placement exam for entrance into the Musicianship courses. This placement exam will be held on Wednesday, August 29, at 12:00pm in OCH 107. There are no exemptions from this exam, please email Adam Carter, with any questions.

These lab courses give practical experience with many aspects of musical perception, performance, and creation. These will include sight-reading and sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and harmony; aural identification of intervals, chords, and rhythmic patterns; and exercises in musical memory and improvisation. Students entering the sequence take a test to determine the appropriate level of their first course. At the end of each course, students take a placement test to determine whether they may enter a higher level course. Courses may be repeated for credit, but each course may be counted toward the major only once. MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336 are co-requisites for MUSI 3310, 3320, and 4331. This means that students pre-registering in the latter courses must also pre-register in MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336 unless they have already taken the highest level course and have been passed out of further co-requisite requirements. Students interested in taking Musicianship but not Theory are encouraged to register for MUSI 3332, 3334, or 3336 as space permits. Such students may not pre-register. They should plan to register by adding in Fall after taking a placement exam.

MUSI 3332 Musicianship I

Lecture / Section 1: (Adam Carter) M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Stephanie Gunst) F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11214

Lecture / Section 2: (Adam Carter) M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Stephanie Gunst) W / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11213

MUSI 3334 Musicianship II

Lecture / Section 1: (Adam Carter) W / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Peter D'Elia) F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11216

Lecture / Section 2: (Adam Carter) W / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Peter D'Elia) M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11215

MUSI 3336 Musicianship III

Lecture / Section 1: (Adam Carter) F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Victor Szabo) M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11217

Lecture / Section 2: (Adam Carter) F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107 and (Victor Szabo) W / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11218

MUSI 3370 Songwriting

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19662

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Joe Adkins): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH S008
Class Number: TBA

Section 102 (Joe Adkins): R / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: TBA

Section 103 (Joe Adkins): R / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: TBA

The goal of this course is to delve into songwriting; to develop your aural, analytic and creative abilities and to join them together in understanding and composing songs. You will learn about rhythm, melodic design, harmonic progression, lyrics and song forms. You will also work on eartraining, so that concepts you learn will be sonically meaningful. We will consider examples from a broad musical spectrum: blues, folk, tin pan alley, musicals, R & B, rock & roll, hip hop. We will also discuss the issues that songwriters encounter. You will have the opportunity to suggest songs for study, and some assignments will be done in groups. In these situations, we will organize groups that have complementary abilities for in-class performances. The Lab is a required part of the class, and you must sign up for a lab section. During the lab you will go over concepts we are covering in class, as well as work on additional eartraining, analysis and creative projects.

Prerequisites: MUSI 3310 or Instructor Permission

MUSI 3390 Introduction to Music and Computers

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19662

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Erik DeLuca): R / 3:30-4:20 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 11221

Section 102 (Erik DeLuca): R / 3:30-5:20 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 11220

Section 103 (Erik DeLuca): R / 5:30-6:20 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 11222

Introduction to Music and Computers in an upper-level introductory course in music technology. Students gain theoretical, historical and practical knowledge of electronic and computer music. An emphasis is placed on creative hands-on experience composing computer music. 

Theoretical and practical topics include acoustics, recording, editing and mixing, MIDI, sound synthesis, and audio DSP. Programs used will include Audacity, Spear, SoundHack, Pro Tools, Logic, and MaxMSP. Note that you MUST register for the Lab (0 credits) as well as the course. 

3390 fulfills the composition requirement of the Music Major. This is a composition class and most assignments are creative in nature.

MUSI 3993 Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 4331 Theory III

Michael Puri
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 9:30-10:45 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11224

Studies in 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century techniques and styles through analysis and composition.  Prerequisite: MUSI 3320 or instructor permission; Corequisite:  MUSI 3332, 3334, or 3336, except for students who have already passed the exit test for MUSI 3336.

MUSI 4507 Composers
Topic: Beethoven

Richard Will
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19663

This course offers in-depth study of Beethoven’s works and their 19th- and 20th-century reception.  In addition to the music, the composer’s life, and the contexts in which he worked, we shall consider how Western culture has used Beethoven’s music in its constructions of subjectivity, genius, national identities, and more.

MUSI 4509 Cultural & Historical Studies
Topic: Leonard Bernstein

Michael Slon
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 1:00-2:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11895

This seminar will focus on the man and musician considered one of the most widely influential American musicians of the 20th century. Our studies fill focus on several aspects of Bernstein's life and career. Music covered will include Candide,West Side Story, the Symphonies, Chichester Psalms, and Mass. We'll review his interpretive impact as a conductor, influence as a nationally televised teacher, and religious and political interests. Bernstein was also a prolific writer, so in addition to biographical materials, class readings will consider his published works including The Joy of Music,The Unanswered Question: Six Talks at Harvard, and Findings.

MUSI 4519 Critical Studies of Music
Topic: Trauma, Mourning, Shame

Fred Maus
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00pm-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number:16404

We will consider various relations of music to trauma, mourning, shame and related phenomena. Readings draw on musicological texts as well as the rich offerings in clinical and humanities scholarship. We will consider the interplay between individual psychology and social/political issues, drawing on a broad range of popular and classical musics. Specific issues include wartime experiences, sexual abuse trauma, AIDS/HIV, slavery, the Holocaust, 9-11, homosexual shame, and funeral music.

MUSI 4547 Materials of Contemporary Music

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 5:00-6:15 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 19664

 

MUSI 4581 Composition I

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19665

MUSI 4581, Composition, will focus on composing notated instrumental and vocal music, with models drawn from classical and contemporary repertoire. The course will feature several in-class visits and performances by our artist faculty, composition projects to be performed by class members, and a final project and concert. You will learn how to maximize the use of notation programs for both traditional and new instrumental compositions, and will have the opportunity to explore a broad musical range. Assignments will include listening and analysis as well as creative projects that respond to and build on the music we study. There will be both group and individual projects, and you will develop a portfolio of music over the course of the semester. Proficiency on an instrument or voice is required, as is at least MUSI 3320, with MUSI 4331 as a pre-or-co-requisite preferred.

MUSI 4710 Instrumental Conducting I

Kate Tamarkin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 19666

 

MUSI 4993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

 

Graduate Courses

MUSI 7508 American Music

Scott DeVeaux
3.0 credits
Lecture: W / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008 
Class Number: 19667

 

MUSI 7511 Introduction to Research in Music

Bonnie Gordon
3.0 credits
Lecture: R / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 12026

 

MUSI 7532 Musical Analysis
Topic: Wagner's Operas: Lohengrin and Parsifal

Michael Puri
3.0 credits
Lecture: T / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 16406

At the upbeat to the 2013 bicentennial celebrations of Richard Wagner's birth, we take a moment in this seminar to reassess the work of a composer whose music and writings are arguably just as influential, perplexing, and controversial today as they were in the nineteenth century. We will focus on two operas, Lohengrin (1848) and Parsifal (1881): in addition to their interrelated plots (Lohengrin is the son of Parsifal), their position at the middle and end of his oeuvre allows us to survey his overall development as a composer. Readings will include not only the most important and recent essays by musicologists, but also those by Baudelaire, Nietzsche, Zizek, Badiou, and others.

Prerequisites: the abilities to read music and identify harmonic progressions. German language skills are helpful, but not required.

MUSI 7543 Sound Studio
Topic: Producer as Composer

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: R / 5:00-7:30 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19668

This seminar examines the increasingly creative role of production in recorded music over the last 50 years. Materials, topics and themes include: (1) survey and analysis of key recordings; (2) theoretical and practical understanding of technologies used in recording and production; (3) developments in music production (such as the naturalization of 'illusion') in the context of broader technological and cultural developments; and (4) creative studio projects.

MUSI 8810: Advanced Composition

3.0 credits

MUSI 8910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by first-year graduate students.

MUSI 8960: Thesis

3.0 credits

MUSI 8993: Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits

Independent study dealing with a specific topic. Requirements will place primary emphasis on independent research.

MUSI 8998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

MUSI 9010: Directed Readings

3.0 credits

MUSI 9910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by second year graduate students.

MUSI 9930: Independent Research

3.0 credits

Research carried out by graduate student in consultation with an instructor.

MUSI 9998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

Preliminary research directed towards a dissertation in consultation with an instructor.

MUSI 9999: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.

 

Music Ensembles and Performance Instruction

For information on auditions, please visit our auditions website.

MUBD 2610, 2620, 2630 and 2640: Marching Band I-IV

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: TRF 6:00-8:20 pm, TBA

MUBD 2610
Class Number: 11110

MUBD 2620
Class Number: 11111

MUBD 2630 
Class Number: 11112

MUBD 2640
Class Number: 11113

The Cavalier Marching Band is open to all students at the University of Virginia by audition. The band is comprised of members from nearly every major at UVA. A normal practice schedule is twice a week, with additional Friday practices on home game weeks.  Attendance is mandatory at our band camp in August. There are no fees to be in the Cavalier marching Band. IF you are interested please contact the band office at 434.982.5347 or email William Pease .

MUEN 2690, 3690 and 4690 African Music and Dance Ensemble

(registration number depends on student seniority in the ensemble)

Eric Gertner
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 5:00-7:15 pm / OCH 107

MUEN 3690 / Level I
Class Number: TBA

MUEN 3690 / Level II
Class Number:
 TBA

MUEN 4690 / Level III
Class Number:
 TBA

The African Music and Dance Ensemble is a practical, hands-on course focusing on several music/dance forms from Western and Central Africa with performances during and at the end of the semester. Though no previous experience with music or dance is required, we will give special attention to developing tight ensemble dynamics, aural musicianship, and a polymetric sensibility. Concentration, practice, and faithful attendance are required of each class member, the goal being to develop an ongoing U.Va. African Music and Dance Ensemble.

MUEN 3600: Jazz Ensemble

John D'earth
2.0 credits
Lecture: MR / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11114

Led by internationally recognized jazz trumpeter/composer John D'earth, the Jazz Ensemble is a full-sized jazz big band, whose focus includes “head arrangements” group improvisation, world music and original compositions from within the band, along with music ranging from swing to bop to fusion. You'll gain valuable experience in ensemble playing and in the art of solo improvisation, and may take private instruction in jazz improvisation, perform in small combos and participate in jazz workshops held by such major figures as Michael Brecker, John Abercrombi, Dave Leibman, Bob Moses, Clark Terry, and Joe Henderson.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3610: Orchestra

Kate Tamarkin, Conductor
2.0 credits

Strings

Lecture / Section 100: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11115

Sectionals: M / 5:30-7:00 pm

Section 101: Pete Spaar (Double Bass) / OCH B012
Class Number: 11117

Section 102: Adam Carter (Cello) / OCH S004
Class Number: 11118

Section 103: Ayn Balija (Viola) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11119

Section 104: Daniel Sender (Violin) / OCH 107
Class Number: 11120

Section 105: David Sariti (Violin) / OCH B018
Class Number: 11121

 

Brass / Woodwinds / Percussion

Lecture / Section 200: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11116

Sectionals: W / 5:15-6:15 pm

Section 201: Susan Fritts (Horn) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11125

Section 202: Rob Patterson (Clarinet) / TBA 
Class Number: 11123

Section 203: Aaron Hill (Oboe) / TBA
Class Number: 11126

Section 204: Elizabeth Roberts (Bassoon) / OCH B020
Class Number: 11122

Section 205: Kelly Sulick (Flute) / OCH B019
Class Number: 11124

Section 206: Paul Neebe (Trumpet) / 107
Class Number: 11129

Section 207: Nathan Dishman (Trombone) / B012 
Class Number: 11128

Section 208: I-Jen Fang (Percussion) / B018
Class Number: 11127

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3620: Wind Ensemble

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: M / 6:45-9:00 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building / Room 200
Class Number: 11888

The Wind Ensemble is a 45-member ensemble that features the most outstanding brass, woodwind, and percussion players at the University. The focus of this ensemble is to explore new literature as well as perform the masterworks of the wind band era. The wind ensemble also works with outstanding guest performers and conductors. This group is predominately made up of non-music majors who enjoy the genre of the wind band. Open to all University of Virginia students, auditions are held prior to the start of each semester. For more information on the Wind Ensemble, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/ensembles/windensemble/.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 1: Chamber Music Ensemble

Daniel Sender
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA 
Class Number: 11132

MUEN 3630, Section 2: Double Reed Ensemble

Aaron Hill
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 5:15-6:45 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11131

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 3: Flute Ensemble

Kelly Sulick
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11130

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 4: Woodwind Ensemble

Elizabeth Roberts
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11133

Explore, rehearse and perform woodwind chamber music, including both standard and more obscure works. Focus on developing chamber music playing skills, learning the tendencies of the woodwind instruments, developing musicianship, and enjoying making and sharing music! Instructor permission and audition required.

MUEN 3630, Section 5: Brass Quintet

Paul Neebe
1.0 credit
Lecture: W / 3:30-4:30 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11135

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630: Jazz Chamber Ensemble

1.0 credit

Lecture / Section 7: Pete Spaar / R / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11139

Lecture / Section 12: Pete Spaar / F / 12:30-2:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11140

Lecture / Section 21: Mike Rosensky / T / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 12259

Lecture / Section 22: Jeff Decker / F / 2:30-3:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 12260

MUEN 3630, Section 8: Horn Ensemble

Susan Fritts
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11134

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 9: Klezmer Ensemble

Joel Rubin
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH 113 
Class Number: 11137

Klezmer, originally the ritual and celebratory music of the Yiddish-speaking Jews of Eastern Europe, was brought to North America by immigrants around the turn of the last century. Since the 1970s, a dynamic revival of this tradition has been taking place in America and beyond. Klezmer’s recent popularity has brought it far from its roots in medieval minstrelsy and Jewish ritual and into the sphere of mainstream culture. The traditional klezmer style presents the experienced instrumentalist with a range of technical challenges with its characteristic note bends, rubati, Baroque-style embellishments and other micro-improvisational techniques, opening up a world of expressive possibilities not available to them from either classical music or jazz. This music was passed on orally from generation to generation, and many of the ornaments which are so integral to the klezmer sound can only be approximated by Western staff notation – not to mention the patterns of improvised variation which are the cornerstone of the style. There will therefore be an emphasis on learning by ear as much as possible, but we will be using music in the form of lead sheets and other written instructional materials to supplement sound examples.

The class focuses on the study and performance of various traditions, including the klezmer traditions of New York between the two world wars, 19th century Eastern Europe, as well as original contemporary compositions. Emphasis will be on learning by ear, improvisation within a modal context, and learning to develop a cohesive ensemble sound. Concentration, practice, and good attendance are required of each ensemble member.

Admission is by audition during first class period of semester or prior to that, by appointment with the instructor.

MUEN 3630, Section 10: Percussion Chamber Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 9:30-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 11138

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Re-established in spring 2005 by I-Jen Fang, principal timpanist and percussionist with CUSO, the Percussion Ensemble is a chamber group that performs literature ranging from classical transcriptions to contemporary music. The ensemble draws upon a large family of pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments, and the number of players and amount of equipment varies greatly from piece to piece. Music reading skills and basic percussion technique on all percussion instruments is required. Previous percussion ensemble experience is highly recommended. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

MUEN 3630, Section 15: Trombone Ensemble

Nathan Dishman
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11136

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition. Contact Nathan Dishman ( ) to schedule an audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 16: Clarinet Ensemble

Rob Paterson
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11141

MUEN 3630, Section 17: Chamber Music Ensemble

Ayn Balija
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11142

MUEN 3630, Section 18: Chamber Music Ensemble

David Sariti
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: R / 5:00-6:30 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11143

MUEN 3630, Section 20: Chamber Music Ensemble

Adam Carter
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11144

MUEN 3630, Section 23: Chamber Music Ensemble

Mimi Tung
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 12835

MUEN 3650: University Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11146

The University Singers is the University's premier SATB ensemble, performing a cappella and accompanied choral literature ranging from chant to the works of contemporary composers. Past repertoire has included Bach's Mass in B minor, Orff's Carmina Burana, the Duruflé Requiem, and Bernstein's Chichester Psalms, as well as shorter a cappella works. Recent trips have taken the group to Atlanta, Charlotte,Chicago, Cincinnati, New Orleans,New York City, Philadelphia, and the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., as well as the campuses of other American universities for collaborative concerts. The group has also been heard on European tours in England, Italy, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland. Recent highlights have included performances with the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia, a concert and workshop with Bobby McFerrin, and a concert tour of the Southeastern U.S.

Students in the University Singers come from all six of UVA's undergraduate schools, including Arts and Sciences, Education, and Engineering, as well as several of the University's graduate and professional schools. Together, they enjoy an esprit de corps that arises from the pursuit of musical excellence and the camaraderie the singers develop offstage.

All singers at the University - undergraduates, graduate students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to audition. University Singers is offered for two hours academic credit. Michael Slon, who has conducted choruses at the Oberlin Conservatory and Indiana University School of Music, is the conductor. For more information on the University Singers, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/usingers/. Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3651: Chamber Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: F / 1:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11145

Chamber Singers is a select ensemble drawn from the University Singers. The ensemble meets once a week and focuses on music for chamber choir ranging from the Renaissance to contemporary pieces. Recent performances have included the Monteverdi Mass for 4 voices (1651), Britten'sHymn to St. Cecilia, and Bach'sCantata 150, as well as contemporary works by Meredith Monk and Eric Whitacre, and arrangements of classic jazz standards by Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, and the King's Singers. Interested singers will be considered for the chamber ensemble as part of their University Singers audition. For more information, please visit our webpage at www.virginia.edu/music/chambersingers

Restricted to: Instructor permission

MUEN 3670: Early Music Ensemble: Baroque Orchestra

David Sariti
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 7:30-9:00 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12027

The Baroque Orchestra, directed by David Sariti, offers students the rare opportunity to perform music of the 17th and 18th centuries on the instruments for which it was written, at low pitch.  Students use period instruments from the University's extensive collection, receiving personal instruction on the special techniques necessary, and must be accomplished on their modern counterparts.

MUEN 3680: New Music Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 3:45-5:15 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11147

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Performance of vocal and instrumental music of the twentieth century.

A one-credit course at the University of Virginia, the New Music Ensemble explores and performs exciting music of our time. The ensemble consists of dedicated instrumentalists, singers and UVa performance faculty. We perform a wide variety of contemporary music suitable to our instrumentation, including new works created by UVa composers.

The New Music Ensemble seeks dedicated instrumentalists and singers to explore and perform a wide variety of contemporary music. To audition, come to the first class with your instrument. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

Open to UVA students, community musicians and advanced high school students.

 

Private Performance Instruction

For more information on registration procedures, please visit the lessons website.

Lesson Levels

There are three levels of private performance instruction.

200-level

For students playing at a beginner to intermediate level or with limited time to practice. One hour or one-half hour lessons, CR/NC (pass-fail), ½ or 1 credit. No jury, but optional performance opportunities will be available. Individual instructors may, as they wish, set definite performance requirements for their students. A limited number of scholarships may be possible, as funding permits, but normally students at this level should expect to pay for their lessons.

300-level

Advanced performance, for students working at the level of a music major, though not necessarily majoring in music. Prerequisite: at least one semester of 200-level study and a successful audition. Normally auditions take place during fall or spring juries; if this is not possible, students audition at the beginning of the semester. One hour lessons, graded, 2 credits. Students at this level should make a time-commitment to practicing appropriate for major-level study. We suggest a norm of at least 6 hours/week, though individual performance instructors may set a different (lower or higher) expectation of practice time as appropriate. Students play a jury at the end of the semester. Students at this level are often on scholarship, but scholarship support is always contingent on availability of funds.

400-level

Honors performance, to be taken for two semesters, by fourth year students preparing a senior recital or, in cases of unusual ability, by students preparing a full recital to be given before their fourth year. Prerequisite: 300-level study, successful written application in the semester before enrolling, and a successful audition (to be included in juries) at the end of the semester before applying. One hour lessons, graded, 2 credits. Jury at the end of the first semester, recital near the end of the second semester. Normally on scholarship, but scholarship support is always contingent on availability of funds.

Offerings

Lessons are offered in the following areas (See the Course Catalog for complete listings):

* Voice
* Piano, Organ, and Harpsichord
* Violin, Viola, Cello, Doublebass
* Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, English Horn, Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Bassoon, Contra-Bassoon
* Trombone, Trumpet, Tuba, French Horn, Saxophone, Jazz Improv
* Percussion, Jazz Drumming, Tabla, Afro-Cuban percussion
* Guitar, Chapman Stick, Banjo, Harp, Mandolin
* Supervised Performance (For students involved in types of solo or ensemble performance not offered through the department.)

 

Spring 2013

Undergraduate Academic Courses

MUSI 1010: Introduction to Music

Bonnie Gordon
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 11:00-11:50 am / Maury 104
Class Number: 19749

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Jarek Ervin): F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19750

Section 102 (Jarek Ervin): F / 1:00-1:50 pm, OCH S008
Class Number: 19751

Section 103 (Jarek Ervin): F / 2:00-2:50 pm, OCH S008
Class Number: 19752

Surveys the musical literatures that make up the common listening experience of contemporary Americans, emphasizing such “classical” repertories as symphony, opera, “early music”, “new music,” blues, and jazz. Teaches effective ways of listening to and thinking critically about each repertoire. Considers how musical choices reflect or create cultural identities, including attitudes toward gender, ethnicity, social relationships, and ideas of the sacred.

MUSI 1310: Basic Musical Skills

Emily Gale / Jean Maroun / Elizabeth Sapir
3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Emily Gale): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11362

Lecture / Section 2 (Jean Maroun): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11363

Lecture / Section 3 (Elizabeth Sapir): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 11361

Not open to students already qualified to elect MUSI 3310 or 3320. Study of the rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music.

MUSI 1620: History of the Wind Band

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: T / 2:00-3:40 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 15124

 

MUSI 2080: American Music: History of Rock

Michael Bishop
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:45 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 12420

 

MUSI 2120: History of Jazz Music

Scott DeVeaux
4.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-12:15 pm / Wilson 402
Class Number: 11364

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Kevin Davis): W / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11365

Section 102 (Courtney Kleftis): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11366

Section 103 (Courtney Kleftis): F / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008 
Class Number: 11367

Section 104 (Kevin Davis): W / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11368

Section 105 (Kevin Davis): W / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 11369

Section 106 (Peter D'Elia): W / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 11370

Section 107 (Peter D'Elia): W / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 113 
Class Number: 11371

Section 108 (Stephanie Gunst): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 11372

Section 109 (Peter D'Elia): W / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11373

Section 110 (Stephanie Gunst): F / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 15128

Section 111 (Courtney Kleftis): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 15129

Section 112 (Stephanie Gunst): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 15130

Section 113 (Kristina Warren): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 19753

Section 114 (Kristina Warren): R / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19754

Section 115 (Kristina Warren): T / 1:00-1:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 19755

Survey of jazz music from before 1900 through the stylistic changes and trends of the twentieth century; important instrumental performers, composers, arrangers, and vocalists.

MUSI 2302: Keyboard Skills (Beginning)

Craig Comen
2.0 credits, Instructor Permission

Lecture / Section 1: TR / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 12416

Lecture / Section 2: TR / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 16079

Introductory keyboard skills; includes sight-reading, improvisation, and accompaniment at the keyboard in a variety of styles. No previous knowledge of music required. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors.

MUSI 2304: Keyboard Skills (Intermediate)

John Mayhood
2.0 credits, Instructor Permission
Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12417

Intermediate keyboard skills for students with some previous musical experience. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors. Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUSI 2306: Fretboard Harmony

Mike Rosensky
2.0 credits, Instructor Permission
Lecture: MWF / 1:00-1:50 / OCH B012
Class Number: 12418

The level of this course will vary, anywhere from beginning to advanced, each semester depending on the guitar experience of students who enroll. Students should contact Mike Rosensky () during pre-registration letting him know of their interest in the course and of their intent to show up for the first class of the semester when the level and the make-up of the class will be ultimately determined.

In Fretboard Harmony a theory-based approach will be taken to understanding how musical materials (scales, arpeggios, chord voicings) "fit" on the guitar. The majority of class meeting time is spent with guitars in hand "drilling" new material. Practice methods will be explored, with an emphasis on learning how to practice effectively and efficiently.

MUSI 2340: Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1: MW / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 15131

Lecture / Section 2: MW / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 12419

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns. This course will follow my book "Learn To Groove" and can include music students, non music students and is open to students of all skill levels. The course requires that students have or purchase a hand drum of their own. Congas, bongos, djembes, doumbeks or any other hand drums are appropriate.

MUSI 2559: Make Rock

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits

Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:45 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 20770

An introduction to rock from the 1950's to the present, comprised of musical, cultural and technological histories, as well as compositional projects. We will seek to appreciate classic records by understanding the influences, points of view and poetic processes of their makers. Rather than proceeding chronologically, the course will be organized around musical and poetic foundations such as the backbeat, the politics of (in)sincerity, the solo, distortion. Creative assignments will revolve around making rock. Experience and membership in a band are welcome, though not required.

MUSI 2600: Jazz Improvisation Workshop

John D'earth
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 13685

The Jazz Improvisation Workshop explores the basic techniques and procedures for improvising in jazz and other musical contexts. No previous jazz or improvising experience is required but students must demonstrate a degree of fluency on their main instrument, an ability to read music and some familiarity with the basics of music theory. An individual interview/audition with the instructor is required before registering for this class.

MUSI 3040: Twentieth-Century Music

Peter Tschirhart
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00 am - 12:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 19757

Explores music and musical practices, descended from the European art music tradition, as they emerged during the last century. In addition to examining a wide range of styles, techniques, and compositional philosophies, this course will encourage students to question how historical and cultural circumstances shaped musical practice: How should new music situate itself in relation to the traditions of the past? How can the conceptual limits of music be pushed? On what terms does music intersect with film, popular entertainment, and technology? Several class meetings will also be devoted to special topics, including music and politics, performance practice, and sound installation art.

MUSI 3050: Music and Discourse Since 1900

Scott DeVeaux
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11374

Studies the range of music that has flourished in the twentieth century, including modernist and post-modern art music, popular music, and world music, through historical, critical, and ethnographic approaches.

Required of all majors; fulfills the "Introductory course" requirement for majors.

Prerequisite: The ability to read music, or any three-credit course in music, or instructor permission.

MUSI 3090: Performance in Africa

Michelle Kisliuk
4.0 credits
Lecturer: TR / 4:00-4:50 pm /OCH 107
Class Number: 16082

Discussion Section: TR / 5:00-7:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 16632

This course explores performance in Africa through reading, discussion, audio and video examples, hands-on practice, and – new this semester – teaching and performing with local school children. The course meets together with MUSI 3690 (African Drumming and Dance Ensemble), but is a full academic course. Students in Music 3090 are automatically part of the UVA African Music and Dance Ensemble. Your role in the Ensemble as learner and performer is crucial to your overall work in the course. This semester, the Community Engagement initiative will involve students participating once a week in an after-school club, teaching and mentoring children from two area schools.

We will explore African music/dance styles – focusing on Ewe music from Ghana and Togo and BaAka music from the Central African Republic, but branching to other forms and genres – their sociomusical circumstances and processes, as well as performed resistances and responses to the colonial and post/neo-colonial encounter. In addition, we will address the politics and processes involved in translating performance practices from one cultural context to another. Each students’ personal relationship to the material/experience will be integrated into study. Readings, discussions, and written work will focus heavily on topics and issues related to the main music/dance traditions that we are learning to perform this semester, though we may venture beyond those areas from time to time. The course will explore both "traditional" and "popular" styles, leading us to question those categories.

There is an informal audition for this course. No experience is expected, just come to the first evening class meeting (5:15) ready to sing and dance (in groups).

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

MUSI 3310: Theory I

Matthew Jones
3.0 credits

Lecture: MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 19758

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significant compositions by period composers.

MUSI 3320: Theory II

Amy Coddington / Gretchen Michelson
3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1: Amy Coddington / MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11376

Lecture / Section 2: Gretchen Michelson / MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 11375

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significant compositions by period composers.

Co-requisite: MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336.

MUSI 3332, 3334 and 3336: Musicianship I, II and III

1.0 credit

These lab courses give practical experience with many aspects of musical perception, performance, and creation. These will include sight-reading and sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and harmony; aural identification of intervals, chords, and rhythmic patterns; and exercises in musical memory and improvisation. Students entering the sequence take a test to determine the appropriate level of their first course. At the end of each course, students take a placement test to determine whether they may enter a higher level course. Courses may be repeated for credit, but each course may be counted toward the major only once. MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336 are co-requisites for MUSI 3310, 3320, and 4331. This means that students pre-registering in the latter courses must also pre-register in MUSI 3332, 3334, and 3336 unless they have already taken the highest level course and have been passed out of further co-requisite requirements. Students interested in taking Musicianship but not Theory are encouraged to register for MUSI 3332, 3334, or 3336 as space permits. Such students may not pre-register. They should plan to register by adding in Fall after taking a placement exam.

MUSI 3332: Musicianship I

Joe Adkins
Lecture: MW / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11377

MUSI 3334: Musicianship II

Stephanie Doktor
Lecture: WF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 11378

MUSI 3336: Musicianship III

Adam Carter
Lecture: M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012 and F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11379

MUSI 3390: Introduction to Music & Computers

Troy Rogers
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 16083

Lab Sections:

Section 100 (Chris Peck): M / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 16473

Section 101 (Chris Peck): M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number:16474

Section 102 (Chris Peck): M / 7:00-7:50 pm / OCH B011 
Class Number: 16475

MUSI 3390 will introduce you to the dynamic field of computer music, giving you historical, theoretical, and practical knowledge of digital music. You will develop an understanding of the factors that enabled the development of digital music, and explore a variety of compositional traditions, ranging from acousmatic to soundscape to ambient and dance composition. We will also consider current musical trends, including sonic appropriation and the role of effects processing as an orchestrational element. These developments have had profound effects on compositional practice, and we will study them both through analysis and through our own compositions. A variety of topics will illuminate these issues, including basic acoustics and perception, recording, multitrack audio, digital signal processing (DSP), and MIDI. Readings will provide a context for understanding the history of this emerging field. Listening and analysis assignments will sharpen your understanding of current practices, and lab meetings will give practical assistance. You will use this knowledge in recording and processing sounds and creating your own compositions. You will have weekly assignments, including several smaller composition projects, before turning to a more extended final project.There will also be 3 quizzes. Programs to be used include Audacity, Logic Pro, Soundhack and Spear.

Note that you MUST REGISTER for the Lab (0 credits) as well as registering for the course. MUSI 3390 counts for the Music Major Composition requirement.

MUSI 3400: EcoAcoustics

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 20913

Ecoacoustics explores the intersection between environmentalism and music. In the seminar we examine the acoustic characteristics of our environment, and analyze human-environmental interaction using scientific measurement and observations of the sounding world. We will experiment with specialized audio recording techniques and equipment. We will employ analysis software to explore complex human-nature dialectics, and editing/tracking software to compose our own ecoacoustic compositions. Ecoacoustics as a musical genre engages with environmental energy as composition. Students in this seminar will create their own ecoacoustic sound works as we study seminal works from the musical and artistic fields of acoustic ecology, sonology, soundscape composition, sonification, earthwork art, and deep listening. We will analyze music by composers who responded to natural phenomena, as well as those practicing ecoacoustic composition. This class may meet the composition requirement for the Major.

MUSI 4510: Cultural & Historical Studeis
Topic:Roots Music of Multicultural America

Joel Rubin
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12415

"Roots Music of Multicultural America” looks at American traditional and popular musics from a cross-cultural and multi-ethnic perspective. We will examine the traditions most often called “roots music,” including African-American blues and southern old-time string band music, which influenced the development of rock and roll and country and western. We will also study a wide range of other ethnic musical traditions, from Native American pow wows and Cajun to salsa, klezmer and Balkan-Gypsy-punk, which have influenced popular music-making of the past twenty-five years. Along the way we will treat a complex and shifting web of associated ideas, such as authenticity, heritage, nationalism, and multiculturalism, and the musical or music-marketing categories of folk, roots, indie rock, neo-cabaret, and world music. We will ask how “roots” traditions have fed into definitions of “American-ness” over the years, and whether recent trends represent signs of America’s transforming itself into a post-ethnic, post-racial society. This course is designed for music majors, but others may apply with instructor permission. It fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

MUSI 4526: Topics in Ethnomusicology
Topic: Planet Rap: Cultural Globalization and Local Hip Hop Scenes

Catherine Appert
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00 am - 12:15 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19761

In the decades since hip hop first emerged in the South Bronx, it has grown into a global movement, with local scenes emerging in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East. Hip hop’s roots in the cultural expression of marginalized youth in the postindustrial urban United States, in tandem with the often political underpinnings of hip hop lyrics in the early to mid-1990s, have meant that this music is often understood by local and global audiences as a music of resistance and politicized social commentary. Theories of globalization often emphasize the disproportionate economic and cultural influence of the Global North. But increasingly, global hip hop audiences do not just consume hip hop; they also produce it. Drawing on scholarship, musical recordings, documentary films, music videos, interviews, and poetry, this course engages theories of cultural globalization through focused case studies of local hip hop cultures outside of the United States. In the locally specific intersections of transnational networks of people, ideas, and commodities, youth throughout the world increasingly draw on U.S. hip hop to address their own lived experiences of marginality, exploitation, and displacement, localizing the music in ways that potentially complicate dominant models of cultural globalization.

MUSI 4533: Advanced Musicianship

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 19762

This class is intended to extend students' musicianship skills beyond the parameters of the 333x Musicianship classes. (Students should have already completed these classes to enroll in Advanced Musicianship.) The class will include practical experience in the following areas: score reading at the piano with attention to multiple clefs; harmonic, melodic, and rhythmic dictation from played excerpts and recordings; advanced sight-singing (including excerpts from Modus Novus); aural error detection in comparing printed scores with played examples; and exercises in improvisation and musical memory.Depending on enrollment, regular individual meetings with the instructor may be set up in lieu of some group class time.

MUSI 4535: Interactive Media: Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE)

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 5:00-6:15 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 16431

Lab Sections:

Section 101 (Max Tfirn): TBA
Class Number: 20783

Section 102 (Max Tfirn):TBA
Class Number: 20784

Section 102 (Max Tfirn):TBA
Class Number: TBA

Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE) is an advanced seminar in music composition, interactive software programming, and performance. The class explores the theoretical and practical aspects of composing and performing real-time interactive music with computers. In this class we engage with the computer as a musical collaborator. Emphasis is placed on gaining a deeper and more personal understanding of the possibilities of real time music technology. The class creates the Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE), and will perform with and compose for the MICE while gaining skills in human-computer interaction. We will emphasize performance and so instrumental/vocal musicians, even those without significant composition or computer programming experience, are also encouraged to join the class. MUSI 4350 will meet the composition requirement for the Major.

MUSI 4543: Sound Studio

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: R / 5:00-7:30 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19763

Lab Sections:

Section 101 (Paul Turowski): 20785
Class Number: TBA

Section 102 (Paul Turowski):TBA
Class Number: 20786

Section 103 (Paul Turowski):TBA
Class Number: 20787

 

MUSI 4720: Instrumental Conducting II

Kate Tamarkin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 19764

Continued studies in the art of conducting, with weekly experience conducting a small choral ensemble. Areas of study include further mastery of rehearsal technique, baton/hand technique, elements of expression (including facial expression and gestural variation), left hand facility, and aural awareness – and in conjunction, emphasis on a more advanced understanding of score study and analysis, score reading, and aspects of performance practice related to choral genre and historical context. Instructor permission required. This class satisfies elective and/or performance credits for the music major.

 

Graduate Courses

MUSI 7520: Current Studies in Research and Criticism
Topic: Inventing Folk Music—or Not

Richard Will
3.0 credits
Lecture: R / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008 
Class Number: 16089

Name a folk music--"X Music"--and you can probably find a book or a website called "The Invention of X Music." It will present the tradition, not as the spontaneous expression of a place or community, as most people think of folk music, but as the self-conscious creation of someone with a political, social, or aesthetic agenda. This perspective has helped dispel a lot of romanticized notions about music’s relationship to class, race, region, nation, and more.It has also tended to overlook the ways in which communities may embrace folk music as a potent expression of identity, even when they recognize that it is invented.This seminar will consider the scholarship on invention in light of alternatives that are emerging from ethnography, historical studies, and elsewhere.We will look at a broad range of examples, beginning in the 18thcentury and running to the present, and covering Scottish, Irish, German, Anglo-American, and African-American music among others--everything from jigs and reels to blues and bluegrass. Musical experience is not necessary, and students from all humanities disciplines are welcome.

MUSI 7525: Topics in Ethnomusicology
Topic: TBA

Michelle Kisliuk
3.0 credits
Lecture: W / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19765

 

MUSI 7526: Topics in Ethnomusicology
Topic: Popular Music and the Nation in Africa

Catherine Appert
3.0 credits
Lecture: T / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 16090

This course traces the ideological legacy of colonialism in the modernizing projects of African nation states, and explores the ways in which African populations have appropriated, negotiated, and contested this legacy through musical performance. How has music in Africa intersected with (post)colonialism, nationalism, crisis, and global representation? How does music provide a unique position of articulation for individuals and populations during these different types of struggle, and how might it constitute a particularly effective resource in negotiating these experiences? How can music serve to empower or disempower populations, and what are the implications of its use in the interest of politics? Students will engage postcolonial theory and book length works on popular music in Africa through class presentations and a final critical term paper that integrates the course materials with their own research interests. Prior musical experience is not required.

MUSI 7547: Materials of Contemporary Music
Topic: Temporality in Music

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits
Lecture: W / 3:30-6:00 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 16091

How composers choose to articulate time reflects wildly divergent notions of temporality and of our experience of it. Is it about flow, whatever the viscosity, or about grouping? Does musical time differ from other kinds of time? ? Composers of post-tonal music have developed a plethora of strategies for organizing and inhabiting time. These range from Stravinsky’s metrical interleaving to Stockhausen’s moment form; from Messiaen’s use of Hindu rhythmic modes to Carter’s metric modulations to Takemitu's "ma"; from Feldman’s enormous expanses to Saariaho’s ecstatic temporal flows and Duckworth's proportions. We will consider both the architecture and effects of these approaches, as well as issues such as the relationship between duration and perception, proportion and form, notation and performance. We will explore ideas about and attitudes towards time through readings by composers, philosophers and psychologists.

We will also make our own analyses and respond to pieces by creating brief compositions (or essays) that embody elements of these approaches. Each student will also choose a topic for more extensive analysis and will present that work in class, as well as write a seminar paper (ca. 15-20 pages).

MUSI 7581: Composition

3.0 credits

MUSI 8820: Advanced Composition

3.0 credits

MUSI 8840: Advanced Computer Music Composition

3.0 credits

MUSI 8910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by first-year graduate students.

MUSI 8920: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by first-year graduate students.

MUSI 8960: Thesis

3.0 credits

MUSI 8993: Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits

MUSI 8998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

MUSI 8999: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

MUSI 9010: Directed Readings

3.0 credits

MUSI 9020: Directed Readings

3.0 credits

MUSI 9910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

MUSI 9920: Supervised Research

3.0 credits

MUSI 9940: Independent Research

3.0 credits

 

MUSI 9998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.

MUSI 9999: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits

For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.

 

Music Ensembles and Performance Instruction

For information on auditions, please visit our auditions website.

MUBD 2601: Basketball Band

Andrew Koch
1.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 6:00-8:00 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 14651

MUEN 2600: Concert Band

Andrew Koch
1.0 credits
Lecture: W / 6:25-8:45 pm, Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 11324

MUEN 2690, 3690 and 4690: African Music and Dance Ensemble

(registration number depends on student seniority in the ensemble)

Michelle Kisliuk
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 5:00-7:15 pm / OCH 107

MUEN 2690 / Level I
Class Number:
 TBA

MUEN 3690 / Level II
Class Number:
 16259

MUEN 4690 / Level III
Class Number:
 15141

The African Music and Dance Ensemble is a practical, hands-on course focusing on several music/dance forms from Western and Central Africa with performances during and at the end of the semester. Though no previous experience with music or dance is required, we will give special attention to developing tight ensemble dynamics, aural musicianship, and a polymetric sensibility. Concentration, practice, and faithful attendance are required of each class member, the goal being to develop an ongoing U.Va. African Music and Dance Ensemble.

MUEN 3600: Jazz Ensemble

John D'earth
2.0 credits
Lecture: MR / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11325

Led by internationally recognized jazz trumpeter/composer John D'earth, the Jazz Ensemble is a full-sized jazz big band performing the entire range of the jazz tradition (swing, bop, fusion) There is also a focus on “head arrangements,” group improvisation, world music and original compositions from within the band. You'll gain valuable experience in ensemble playing and in the art of solo improvisation. Private instruction in jazz improvisation and the opportunity to perform in small combos are offered in conjunction with this class. The Jazz Ensemble has presented guest artist concerts/residencies with such major figures as Michael Brecker, Joe Henderson, John Abercrombie, David Leibman, Bob Moses, Clark Terry, and Terrence Blanchard, among many others.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3610: Orchestra

Kate Tamarkin, Conductor
2.0 credits

Strings

Lecture / Section 100: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11326

Sectionals: M / 5:30-7:00 pm

Section 101: Pete Spaar (Double Bass) / OCH B012
Class Number: 11328

Section 103: Ayn Balija (Viola) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11329

Section 104: Daniel Sender (Violin) / OCH 107
Class Number: 11330

Section 105: David Sariti (Violin) / OCH B018
Class Number:11331

Section 106: Adam Carter (Cello) / OCH S004
Class Number: 14644

Brass / Woodwinds / Percussion

Lecture / Section 200: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11327

Sectionals: W / 5:15-6:15 pm

Section 201: Elizabeth Roberts (Bassoon) / OCH B020
Class Number: 11332

Section 202: Rob Patterson (Clarinet) / TBA 
Class Number: 11333

Section 203: Kelly Sulick (Flute) / TBA
Class Number: 11334

Section 204: Susan Fritts (Horn) / OCH 113
Class Number: 11335

Section 205: Aaron Hill (Oboe) / TBA
Class Number: 11336

Section 206: I-Jen Fang (Percussion) / B018
Class Number: 11337

Section 207: Nathan Dishman (Trombone) / S004
Class Number: 11338

Section 208: Paul Neebe (Trumpet) / TBA
Class Number: 11339

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3620: Wind Ensemble

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: M / 6:25-8:45 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 12413

The Wind Ensemble is a 45-member ensemble that features the most outstanding brass, woodwind, and percussion players at the University. The focus of this ensemble is to explore new literature as well as perform the masterworks of the wind band era. The wind ensemble also works with outstanding guest performers and conductors. This group is predominately made up of non-music majors who enjoy the genre of the wind band. Open to all University of Virginia students, auditions are held prior to the start of each semester. For more information on the Wind Ensemble, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/ensembles/windensemble/.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 1: Percussion Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11340

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Re-established in spring 2005 by I-Jen Fang, principal timpanist and percussionist with CUSO, the Percussion Ensemble is a chamber group that performs literature ranging from classical transcriptions to contemporary music. The ensemble draws upon a large family of pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments, and the number of players and amount of equipment varies greatly from piece to piece. Music reading skills and basic percussion technique on all percussion instruments is required. Previous percussion ensemble experience is highly recommended. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

MUEN 3630, Section 2: Woodwind Ensemble

Elizabeth Roberts
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11341

Explore, rehearse and perform woodwind chamber music, including both standard and more obscure works. Focus on developing chamber music playing skills, learning the tendencies of the woodwind instruments, developing musicianship, and enjoying making and sharing music! Instructor permission and audition required.

MUEN 3630, Section 3: Trombone Ensemble

Nathan Dishman
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11342

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition. Contact Nathan Dishman () to schedule an audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 5: Flute Ensemble

Kelly Sulick
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11343

MUEN 3630: Section 6: Double Reed Ensemble

Aaron Hill
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11344

MUEN 3630: Section 7: Clarinet Ensemble

Rob Patterson
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11345

MUEN 3630, Section 8: Brass Quintet

Paul Neebe
1.0 credit
Lecture: W / 3:30-5:00 pm / TBA
Class Number: 11346

MUEN 3630: Jazz Chamber Ensemble

1.0 credit

Lecture / Section 10: Pete Spaar / R / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11347

Lecture / Section 11: Mike Rosensky / T / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11348

Lecture / Section 12: Jeff Decker / F / 2:00-3:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11349

Lecture / Section 13: Peter Spaar / F / 12:30-2:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11350

MUEN 3630, Section 14: Chamber Music Ensemble

Mimi Tung
1.0 credits, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11351

MUEN 3630, Section 15: Chamber Music Ensemble

Daniel Sender
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11352

 

MUEN 3630, Section 16: Chamber Music Ensemble

David Sariti
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: R / 5:00-6:30 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11353

 

MUEN 3630, Section 17: Chamber Music Ensemble

Ayn Balija
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11354

MUEN 3630, Section 18: Chamber Music Ensemble

Adam Carter
1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 11355

MUEN 3630, Section 19: Horn Ensemble

Susan Fritts
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 15142

MUEN 3630, Section 20: Klezmer Ensemble

Joel Rubin
2.0 credit
Lecture: MW / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 19766

Klezmer, originally the ritual and celebratory music of the Yiddish-speaking Jews of Eastern Europe, was brought to North America by immigrants around the turn of the last century. Since the 1970s, a dynamic revival of this tradition has been taking place in America and beyond. Klezmer’s recent popularity has brought it far from its roots in medieval minstrelsy and Jewish ritual and into the sphere of mainstream culture.

The traditional klezmer style presents the experienced instrumentalist with a range of technical challenges with its characteristic note bends, rubati, Baroque-style embellishments and other micro-improvisational techniques, opening up a world of expressive possibilities not available to them from either classical music or jazz. This music was passed on orally from generation to generation, and many of the ornaments which are so integral to the klezmer sound can only be approximated by Western staff notation – not to mention the patterns of improvised variation which are the cornerstone of the style. There will therefore be an emphasis on learning by ear as much as possible, but we will be using music in the form of lead sheets and other written instructional materials to supplement sound examples.

The class focuses on the study and performance of various traditions, including the klezmer traditions of New York between the two world wars, 19th century Eastern Europe, as well as original contemporary compositions. Emphasis will be on learning by ear, improvisation within a modal context, and learning to develop a cohesive ensemble sound. Concentration, practice, and good attendance are required of each ensemble member.

Our guests for Spring 2013 will be Cookie Segelstein (violin) and Joshua Horowitz (accordion, tsimbl/hammered dulcimer) from the groups Veretski Pass (http://www.veretskipass.com/Veretski_Pass/Home.html) and Budowitz (http://www.budowitz.com/Budowitz/Home.html).

The ensemble's performance in Spring 2013 will be on Thurs., April. 25 at 8 pm in Old Cabell Hall Auditorium. Extra rehearsals will be held on Sunday, April 21 and Tuesday, April 23.

Admission by instructor permission. Audition is the first class session of Spring 2013 semester, Mon., Jan. 14, 2013, 7:30-9:30 pm in OCH 113.

MUEN 3650: University Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 11357

The University Singers is the University's premier SATB ensemble, performing a cappella and accompanied choral literature ranging from chant to the works of contemporary composers. Past repertoire has included Bernstein's Chichester Psalms, the Brahms Requiem, Handel's Messiah, and Mozart's Mass in C minor, as well as shorter a cappella and accompanied works, including a recent co-commission from Eric Whitacre. Recent trips have taken the group to Atlanta, Charlotte, New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Cincinnati, and the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., as well as the campuses of other American universities for collaborative concerts. The group has also been heard on European tours in England, Italy, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland. Recent highlights have included performances with the Charlottesville & University Symphony Orchestra, a workshop with Bobby McFerrin, performances of the Bach Mass in B minor, and a concert tour of the Midwest.

Students in the University Singers come from all six of UVA's undergraduate schools, including Arts and Sciences, Education, and Engineering, as well as several of the University's graduate and professional schools. Together, they enjoy an esprit de corps that arises from the pursuit of musical excellence and the camaraderie the singers develop offstage.

All singers at the University - undergraduates, graduate students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to audition. University Singers is offered for two hours academic credit. Michael Slon, who has conducted choruses at the Oberlin Conservatory and Indiana University School of Music, is the conductor. For more information on the University Singers, please visit our webpage at: www.virginia.edu/music/usingers/. Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3651: Chamber Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: F / 1:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 11356

Chamber Singers is a select ensemble drawn from the University Singers. The ensemble meets once a week and focuses on music for chamber choir ranging from the Renaissance to contemporary pieces. Recent performances have included the Palestrina Missa Brevis, Britten's Hymn to St. Cecilia, and Bach's Cantata 150, as well as contemporary works by Meredith Monk and Eric Whitacre, and arrangements of classic jazz standards by Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, and the King's Singers. Interested singers will be considered for the chamber ensemble as part of their University Singers audition.

Restricted to: Instructor permission

MUEN 3670: Early Music Ensemble: Baroque Orchestra

David Sariti
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 7:30-9:00 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12414

The Baroque Orchestra, directed by David Sariti, offers students the rare opportunity to perform music of the 17th and 18th centuries on the instruments for which it was written, at low pitch. Students use period instruments from the University's extensive collection, receiving personal instruction on the special techniques necessary, and must be accomplished on their modern counterparts.

MUEN 3680: New Music Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11358

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Performance of vocal and instrumental music of the twentieth century.

A one-credit course at the University of Virginia, the New Music Ensemble explores and performs exciting music of our time. The ensemble consists of dedicated instrumentalists, singers and UVa performance faculty. We perform a wide variety of contemporary music suitable to our instrumentation, including new works created by UVa composers.

The New Music Ensemble seeks dedicated instrumentalists and singers to explore and perform a wide variety of contemporary music. To audition, come to the first class with your instrument. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

Open to UVA students, community musicians and advanced high school students.

Private Performance Instruction

For more information on registration procedures, please visit our Private Lessons website

Registration process begins with contacting your prospective instructor as early as possible! You must obtain approval from the instructor of your choice before registering. Instructors may require auditions.

Lesson Levels

There are three levels of private performance instruction.

2000-level

For students playing at a beginner to intermediate level or with limited time to practice. One hour or one-half hour lessons, CR/NC (pass-fail), ½ or 1 credit. No jury, but optional performance opportunities will be available. Individual instructors may, as they wish, set definite performance requirements for their students. A limited number of scholarships may be possible, as funding permits, but normally students at this level should expect to pay for their lessons.

3000-level

Advanced performance, for students working at the level of a music major, though not necessarily majoring in music. Prerequisite: at least one semester of 200-level study and a successful audition. Normally auditions take place during fall or spring juries; if this is not possible, students audition at the beginning of the semester. One hour lessons, graded, 2 credits. Students at this level should make a time-commitment to practicing appropriate for major-level study. We suggest a norm of at least 6 hours/week, though individual performance instructors may set a different (lower or higher) expectation of practice time as appropriate. Students play a jury at the end of the semester. Students at this level are often on scholarship, but scholarship support is always contingent on availability of funds.

4000-level

Honors performance, to be taken for two semesters, by fourth year students preparing a senior recital or, in cases of unusual ability, by students preparing a full recital to be given before their fourth year. Prerequisite: 300-level study, successful written application in the semester before enrolling, and a successful audition (to be included in juries) at the end of the semester before applying. One hour lessons, graded, 2 credits. Jury at the end of the first semester, recital near the end of the second semester. Normally on scholarship, but scholarship support is always contingent on availability of funds.

Offerings

Lessons are offered in the following areas (See the Course Catalog for complete listings):

* Voice (audition required)
* Piano (audition required)
* Organ and Harpsichord
* Violin, Viola, Cello and Doublebass
* Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, English Horn, Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Bassoon and Contra-Bassoon
* Trombone, Trumpet, Tuba, French Horn, Saxophone and Jazz Improv
* Percussion, Jazz Drumming, Tabla and Afro-Cuban perucssion
* Guitar, Chapman Stick, Banjo, Mandolin and Harp
* Supervised Performance (For students involved in types of solo or ensemble performance not offered through the department.)

 

Summer 2013

Undergraduate Academic Courses

Session I: May 13 - June 8

MUSI 2070 / 4510: Popular Musics: History of Rock (combined sections)

Michael Biship
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 10:30am-12:45pm / OCH 113
MUSI 2070 Class Number: 12398
MUSI 4510 Class Number: 12399

This course explores the history of “rock and roll” from its roots in American blues, country, and ballad traditions to more modern genres and styles. Students are introduced to ways of thinking, remembering, and writing about popular music as we investigate rock scholarship from the fields of history, musicology, sociology, ethnomusicology and cultural studies as well as journalistic approaches to rock criticism. The goal of the course is to enhance and deepen the enjoyment and appreciation of rock music and its relationship to American cultural history while teaching students to think critically of received historical and cultural narratives of the music. Students will be expected to develop critical listening skills, read scholarly articles and form and articulate written arguments and opinions of their own in response to listening and readings.

MUSI 2390 / 3390: Introduction to Music and Computers (combined sections)

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-3:15 / WIL 235 and 308
MUIS 2390 Class Number: 12402
MUIS 3390 Class Number: 12403

Introduction to Music and Computers is an introductory course in music technology. Students gain theoretical, historical and practical knowledge of electronic and computer music. An emphasis is placed on creative hands-on experience composing computer music. Theoretical and practical topics include acoustics, recording, editing and mixing, MIDI, sound synthesis, and audio DSP. Programs used will include Audacity, Spear, SoundHack, Pro Tools, Logic, and MaxMSP. This is a composition class and most assignments are creative in nature.

MUSI 3390 fulfills the composition requirement of the Music Major.

 

Session II: June 10 - July 6

MUSI 2559: Writing About Music /
MUSI 4509: Cultural and Historical Studies of Music (combined sections)

Fred Maus
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 10:30am-12:45pm / OCH 113
MUSI 2559 Class Number: 12404
MUSI 4509 Class Number: 12405

This course explores different ways of thinking and writing about music, including autobiography, biography, interview, history, criticism, and fiction. Musical examples come from many different times and styles. Students read and discuss examples of different genres and techniques, and the class will discuss student writing in a workshop format. Frequent writing exercises build students’ flexibility and confidence in articulating and sharing ideas about music. Students choose the musical material and writing style for a final project.

MUSI 4509 satisfies the seminar requirement of the Music Major.

MUSI 2340: Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-3:15 / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 12397

Study of rhythmic patterns associated with rhythms from West African, the Caribbean, Brazil, and the United States, through theory and performance. Suitable for music majors and non-majors. MUSI 2340 satisfies the performance requirement of the Music Major.

 

Session III: July 8 - August 3

MUSI 2080: American Music

Victor Szabo
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 10:30am-12:45pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 12395

A survey of the history of popular music in the U.S. from the 19th-century to the present day. We will study and discuss the development of popular genres from ragtime to rock‘n’roll to rap—and lots in between—in relation to significant historical events, advances in technology, and changes in the music industry. Along the way, we will examine how popular musics critically engage aspects of social identity such as class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Background in the study of music is not required.

MUSI 2306: Fretboard Harmony

Mike Rosensky
2.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-2:30 / OCH 113
Class Number: 12396

In this course a theory-based approach will be taken to understanding how musical materials (scales, arpeggios, chord voicings) "fit" on the guitar. Classes will be split between time spent with guitars in hand "drilling" new material and lectures on music theory and other relevant topics that arise during the term. Practice methods will be explored, with an emphasis on learning how to practice effectively and efficiently. MUSI 2340 satisfies the performance requirement of the Music Major.

The class will be tailored to the level/needs of the enrolled students. Prospective students should contact MikeRosensky (createEmail('mlr5q');) during registration to let him know of their interest in the course.

MUSI 2350: Technosonics: Digital Music and Sound Art Composition /
MUSI 4543: Sound Studio: Producer as Composer (combined sections)

Chris Peck
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-3:15 / TBA
MUSI 2350 Class Number: 12400
MUSI 4543 Class Number: 12401

This course explores the history, theory, and practice of producing pop music recordings in light of the now ubiquitous presence of audio software for personal computers, mobile sound recording equipment, and home studios. We will focus on creative projects designed to build skills useful for self-producing musicians in a wide variety of genres. This includes topics such as voice and instrument recording, sequencing and drum programming, mixing and editing, synthesis and sound design, and audio for the web. We will also develop our critical listening skills through analysis of works of recorded music.

MUSI 2350 will be suitable for those with no previous experience.

Assignments and projects in MUSI 4543 will be appropriate for music majors, and the course satisfies the composition or seminar requirement of the Music Major.

Address

McIntire Department of Music
112 Old Cabell Hall
P.O. Box 400176 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4176

Email: music@virginia.edu